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Sunday, July 12, 2009

Guess the Wordle and Summer Vacation Wordles

Wordle is a good tool for creating visual representations of the most commonly used words in a document or on a website. I've featured Wordle on this blog twice in the past. You can read those previous posts about Wordle here and here.

This morning I came across a new wiki called Guess the Wordle. Three times a week Guess the Wordle will post a new Wordle. Then based on the Wordle students can guess what the topic of the Wordle is. Guess the Wordle could be a fun warm-up activity to use with students.

While looking over Guess the Wordle I had a new (to me) thought about using Wordle in the classroom. Writing stories about summer vacation is an assignment that teachers commonly give at the beginning of the school year. This year, when you give that assignment have students create a Wordle when they are done writing their stories. The Wordles created from the stories could be used as a reflection tool by students and yourself to see what things from the summer vacation really stand out in a student's mind.

Least Restrictive Environment for Educators

I usually don't write much about the philosophy and politics of school leadership because it doesn't really fit with the purpose of this blog. But Dr. Scott McLeod put out a call for all edubloggers to post their thoughts about school leadership today. This post is my contribution to Leadership Day 2009.

In my work with special education students over the last six years, I have consistently heard from special education teachers and administrators the refrain of "creating a least restrictive environment for students." The idea being that in a least restrictive environment students have the most opportunities to experience new things, explore their creativity, and grow personally and academically. I completely agree with these ideas.

The irony I see in school leadership with regards to technology in the classroom is that often, by imposing strict internet filters, school leaders don't create a least restrictive environment for their faculty. Some of the most restrictive environments that I've heard of include the blocking of wiki services, gmail, and Google image search (which recently added Creative Commons search). By restricting access to the internet, including such innocuous things as Yahoo mail, schools limit the ability of teachers to use their creativity in lesson planning.

I understand that schools are worried about lawsuits arising from student access to the internet. At the same time if school leaders are filtering the internet out of fear or misunderstanding of the law they are not helping their teachers prepare students for life after high school. (Please note that I did not say "prepare students for the 21st century." We're a decade into the 21st century we should stop saying "21st century skills" and just say "skills" or "skills for academic and professional success.") To address these fears and misunderstandings, Wes Fryer and others created Unmasking the Digital Truth. If you're a school administrator or a teacher who works in a district that doesn't create a least restrictive internet environment, please visit Unmasking the Digital Truth.

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