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Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Explore Careers, Take the Career Quiz

If your high school students are anything like I was in high school (or college for that matter), they probably don't have a clue what they want to do when they graduate. Today, there is a myriad of online "quizzes" and "personality assessments" that students can take to give them some guidance as to what careers they may want to pursue. One such quiz comes from The Princeton Review. The Princeton Review's career quiz is a twenty-four question "this or that" style of quiz that students can use to assess their interests and their habits. From their the quiz generates a list of careers that students may want to explore. There is also a similar quiz for determining college majors that may interest students.

Applications for Education
The Princeton Review has a number of good, free resources (they also have fee-based items) for students, parents, and guidance counselors. The Career Quiz is one such free resource for students to use to plan their futures. That said, with a head nod towards Did You Know, as teachers, guidance counselors, and or parents it's important to remind students that some of today's careers didn't exist ten years ago.

Crickweb - Games for Young Learners

Crickweb is a UK-based website offering a good collection of simple games for young learners. On Crickweb you can find games for students to practice and learn the basics of numeracy, literacy, geography, history, and science. There is also a collection of games for used on Promethean whiteboards.

Applications for Education
Educational games can be useful for students to practice their skills individually. You may want to link Crickweb to your classroom website for parents to access at home with their children.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
XP Math - Math Games, Videos, and More
Word Games to Improve Writing and Vocabulary
All My Faves - Great Websites for Kids

How-to Week, Day 3 - Drop.io, Easy Media Sharing

This is day 3 of how-to week on Free Technology for Teachers. On Monday we looked at getting started with Wikispaces. Yesterday, we looked at starting a blog using Blogger, Edublogs, and WordPress. Today, we will look at all of the things you can do with Drop.io.

Drop.io is a very simple platform for sharing and creating a wide variety of files, links, and media.

Here is a run-down of ten things that you can do with Drop.io:
1. Post documents and PDFs for others to view and download.
2. Post documents, links, videos, audio files for others to access and comment on.
3. Create voice recordings in MP3 format.
4. Establish a voicemail box at no cost to you.
5. Host online presentations.
6. Chat with others accessing your Drop.io page.
7. Create an anonymous @drop.io email account.
8. Create a "drop box" to collect work from students using the Drop.io upload widget.
9. Use Drop.io bookmarklet to bookmark links and add them to your Drop.io page.
10. Offer RSS feed for updates to your Drop.io page.

In the video below I demonstrate how quick and easy it is to get started with Drop.io.


The video below is an overview of all of Drop.io's options.


This video is one of the many Drop.io how-to videos available on Blip.tv


Here are some previous posts I've written about Drop.io:
How Drop.io Saved My Morning
Present.io - Free Web Conferencing from Drop.io
Phone.io - Podcasting With Drop.io

Another Good Place to Find Education Blogs

Yesterday, I posted a link to 100 education blogs. This morning a reader reminded me via email of the Support Blogging wiki. On Support Blogging you can find hundreds of blogs related to education. The wiki is categorized with classroom blogs, professor blogs, teacher blogs, administrator blogs, and much more. There is more to Support Blogging than just lists of blogs, you can also find resources for starting your own blog.

Just in Time for School - Glogster Edu

At the end of June I met with Jim Dachos from Glogster and we talked about what Glogster is developing for educators. You can read about that conversation here. One of the things that Jim shared at the time was that Glogster is building a Glogster education service that is separate from the commercial version of Glogster. At the time Jim wasn't sure when that would be launched. This morning, Andrew Connelly who is the head of business development for Glogster announced on Twitter that the new edu.glogster.com should be available by August 14.


Applications for Education
Glogster is probably best described as service for creating an online collage of videos, music, images, and multiple text styles. Earlier this year I used Glogster to have my special education students create Glogs about various US Presidents. During our conversation Jim shared with me a Glog that was created by a student about Darfur. That Glog can be seen below.

Sound Bible - Free Sound Clips

Sound Bible is a resource for finding and downloading free sound clips, sound effects, and sound bites. All of the sounds on Sound Bible are either public domain or labeled with a Creative Commons license. You can find sounds for use in podcasts, videos, slideshows, or other multimedia creations.

Sound Bible is a resource that I discovered by following a link from another resource listed in Mashable's article 26 Places to Find Free Multimedia for Your Blog.

Applications for Education
Sound Bible could be a good resource to have bookmarked for your students to use when they are creating multimedia presentations. I will be adding Sound Bible to my lists of sound resources in Connecting Social Studies and Art Through Video.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
PodSafe Audio - Sounds for Podcasts
Free Music Archive

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