Saturday, June 15, 2019

Writing Prompts, Beakers, and Fables - The Week in Review

Good morning from Maine where we're hoping that the sun will peak out for a trip to the playground. Maine is known for moose and lobster. At our local playground there is a moose carved into boulder. My daughters always want to sit on it. And they're hoping to do that again today. I hope that you have something fun that you're looking forward to doing this weekend too.

If part of your weekend plans include learning some new things about educational technology, take a look at this week's most popular posts.

These were the week's most popular posts:
1. 500 Creative Writing Prompts
2. Interactive Versions of Aesop's Fables - And Dozens of Other Classic Works
3. Beaker - Virtually Mix Chemicals on Your Phone or Tablet
4. 5 Time-savers for Teachers Using G Suite for Education
5. Moving From Google Drive to OneDrive
6. An Update to Five Directions for AR in Education
7. Teaching With Historical Newspapers - An LOC Webinar Recording

Thank You for Your Support!

Turn Blog Posts and Newsletters Into Videos With Lumen5

For the last few weeks I've been posting on Twitter and on Facebook videos based on blog posts that I have written. To do that I have been using a service called Lumen5. Lumen5 is a service that will produce a video for you based upon your written work.

To create a video with Lumen5 you can enter the URL of your published work or paste in the text of your blog post. Lumen5 will then select highlights from your writing to feature in a video. The video will always begin with the title of your blog post. From there it will use any subheadings or section headings that you have in your blog post to create sections of your video. If you don't have subheadings or section headings in your blog post, Lumen5 will attempt to pull the keywords or phrases from each paragraph.

Lumen5 generates a preview of a video for you based on the title, keywords, and key phrases in your blog post. The video will consist of images and video clips matched to the words in your blog post. If you don't like the words or images that Lumen5 chose for you, you can edit the words and swap the images and video clips with others from Lumen5's huge media library. Finally, once you are happy with the visuals of your video you can pick a free audio track to use in your video.

Completed Lumen5 projects can be shared directly to Facebook. You can also download your video to use on Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and anywhere else that you like post short videos.

Applications for Education
If you have been writing blog posts or newsletters and you feel like none of your students or parents are reading them, try turning those posts or newsletters into a short video. You can't include every word of the post or newsletter, but you can include the highlights which be enough to entice students and parents to read the full text of your post or newsletter.

Friday, June 14, 2019

500 Creative Writing Prompts

Back in April I featured a neat creative writing tool called The Most Dangerous Writing App. Since then The Most Dangerous Writing App has changed to The Most Dangerous Writing Prompts. The service now includes 500 writing prompts to help you get started on your next great work of creative writing.

The concept of The Most Dangerous Writing Prompts is the same as it was when it was called The Most Dangerous Writing App. You have to write for a minimum amount of time or minimum words without stopping for more than a few seconds or all of your work is lost. If you do reach the minimum (you choose what the minimum is), you can download your writing as a Word doc to continue the writing and editing process.

Watch my new video below to learn how to use The Most Dangerous Writing Prompts.

How to Set a Vacation Responder

For the last week my Facebook feed has been filled with posts from friends who are celebrating the last day(s) of the school year. This is a good time to set a vacation responder in your email. If you use Gmail (either consumer or G Suite for Education), watch my video below to learn how you can set an automatic vacation responder.


Applications for Education
Even though you might be on summer vacation, there are parents and students who might email you and except a response just as quickly as during the school year. Setting a polite vacation responder message can remind those parents or students that you might not be available to respond as quickly as they would like.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

5 Time-savers for Teachers Using G Suite for Education

Whether it's to indulge our favorite hobbies, to get some chores done around the house (my lawn can stop growing any minute now), or to spend more time on the fun parts of teaching, we all need a little more time. I can't give you more time, but I can help you be more efficient in completing tasks associated with our jobs. If you use G Suite for Education, try the following five time-saving tips.

Use a Comment Bank in Google Classroom
If you use Google Classroom to give Google Docs, Slides, or Sheets assignments to your students, create and use a comment bank to speed up the process of giving feedback to your students. Watch my video below to learn how to do this.



Use Google Keep to Add Comments to Students' Work
Google Classroom is great for giving feedback on final drafts of students' work. But if you don't use Google Classroom or you want to give students feedback on early drafts of their work, then the following method of using Google Keep to add comments to your students' Docs, Slides, and Sheets can be a time-saver.



Use Canned Responses in Your Email
Do you find yourself answering the same emailed questions over and over again? If so, you need to try using canned responses in your email. Canned responses allow you to draft messages that you can save and insert into responses over and over again. Watch my video to learn how to enable canned responses in Gmail (G Suite for Edu mail).



Self-grading Quizzes
If you give multiple choice, true/false, or short-answer quizzes use automatic grading options that are available to you in Google Forms. In the following video I demonstrate how to create a self-grading quiz in Google Forms.



Set Default Point Values and Requirements in Google Forms
Almost everyone who has made created a Google Form has at one time or another forgotten to set a point value for a quiz question or forgot to require a response to a survey question. You can avoid doing that and having to go back and fix the error by creating default point values and a default question requirement for all of your Google Forms. Watch my video below to learn how to do that.

66 Lessons on the Chemistry of Food and Beverages

Reactions is a YouTube channel that I've mentioned in a handful of posts in the past. The channel is produced by PBS Digital Studios and the American Chemical Society. All of the videos on the channel include chemistry lessons based on ordinary, everyday parts of life like food and beverages. In fact, Reactions has a playlist of sixty-six videos that teach short lessons about the chemistry of food and beverages. Some highlights from that playlist include 3 Egg-cellently Weird Science ExperimentsWhy is Pizza so Good? and Why Does Stinky Cheese Stink?  And who hasn't looked in the refrigerator and wondered Can I Still Eat This? All for of those videos are embedded below.










Applications for Education
All four of the above videos as well as dozens of others in the Food Chemistry playlist could be great to use to help students see how science, specifically chemistry, is a part of everyday life.

If you want to use these videos as part of flipped lesson or a classroom discussion, consider using EDpuzzle or Classhook. I have video tutorials for both of those services embedded below.


Wednesday, June 12, 2019

How to Use WorldCat to Locate Books in Libraries Near You

Over the last couple of days I've seen a lot of summer reading lists floating around on Twitter. If you're starting to acquire your summer reading books, before you hit "buy now" on Amazon, search on WorldCat to see if a library in your area has a copy of the book that you want to read. WorldCat lets you search for a book then enter your zip code to see a list of the libraries in your area that have a copy available to borrow. In the following video I provide a demonstration of how to use WorldCat.org to find books in the libraries in your area.


Applications for Education
WorldCat.org is great not only for finding a copy of a book that you want to read this summer, it's also great for students who are conducting research on Google Books. When students find a book through Google Books they can then use WorldCat to locate the libraries in their area that have copies available to borrow.

Teaching With Historical Newspapers - An LOC Webinar Recording

There are two sites that often refer people to when I'm asked about locating copies of old newspapers. The first is the Google Newspaper Archive. The second is the Chronicling America collection from the Library of Congress. The Chronicling America collection contains more than 2,600 digitized copies of newspapers printed in the United States between 1789 and 1963. You can search through the collection according to date, state in which the newspaper was published, and keyword.

The Library of Congress hosted an online conference for teachers in the fall of 2016. One of the featured presentations of that conference was Teaching With Historical Newspapers. Chronicling America was featured in the presentation. You can watch the recording embedded below to learn how to navigate the Chronicling America collection and pick up some tips for incorporating the newspapers into your practice.

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Beaker - Virtually Mix Chemicals on Your Phone or Tablet

Beaker is an iOS and Android app that lets students virtually mix chemicals. In the app students can select chemicals to mix to see how they react to each other. The app also has a virtual match that students can light to see how chemicals react to heat. The most impressive feature of the app is called Air Mix. The Air Mix feature in Beaker lets students virtually pour chemicals from one Beaker to another. When you have two phones or tablets that have Beaker installed, you can "pour" chemicals from one device to the other to virtually mix them.


Applications for Education
Beaker could be a great app for middle school and high school science students. The app offers more than 150 chemicals that students can virtually mix together in a safe environment. The app provides a safe and cost-effective way to create demonstrations for chemistry lessons.

An Update to Five Directions for AR in Education

Lately, I have been spending quite a bit of time digging into research and academic writing about the development and evolution of many of the educational technologies that are common in schools today. Last week I read through Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education authored by Steve Chi-Yin Yuen, Gallayanee Yaoyuneyong, and Erik Johnson and published in June of 2011 by the Journal of Educational Technology and Exchange. While I was reading I started to think about how far augmented reality has come in the last eight years. What follows is my commentary on those directions given the benefit of the last eight years of development of AR.

The Five Directions
The five directions that Yuen, Yaoyuneyong, and Johnson suggested in Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education are AR books, AR gaming, discovery-based learning, objects modeling, and skills training.

AR Books
In reference to books the authors highlight the potential of AR books to engage many types of learners through many paths. A great example of this potential turned into reality is found today in augmented reality apps like Wonderscope and the World Wildlife Fund's Free Rivers app.

AR Gaming
In reporting about AR gaming in the context of education the authors of Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education featured the study of an AR game called Alien Contact. Alien Contact was used in classrooms to promote engagement and learning in a lesson in which students had to determine why aliens would select an area of earth to land and settle upon. The study indicated that while some students did benefit from engagement others were overwhelmed by the technology. This was five years before the release of the massively popular Pokemon Go augmented reality game. Because of popular games like Pokemon Go students today are likely to be familiar with how to use AR games and so are less likely to be overwhelmed by the complexity of using an app to for an educational experience.

Discovery-based Learning
In Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education the authors devote a section to the potential of augmented reality as a discovery-based learning tool. In doing so they point to using augmented reality applications on field trip experiences. The authors highlight using augmented reality to replace questions on paper with instant information available through the use of AR apps that provide students with instant information about the physical objects in front of them as well as the information about the places they are standing in. The authors highlight the Wikitude service for enabling that kind of instant information availability. Relying on Wikitude could be limiting because developers are inclined to create applications for the most popular places and artifacts. Through the use of a free service like Metaverse Studio teachers and students can develop augmented reality discovery experiences for lesser-known places. As an example, in 2017 I used Metaverse Studio to develop an augmented reality discovery experience for livestock pounds in my small town. You can read about the example and see Metaverse Studio in action here.

Objects Modeling
Yuen, Yaoyuneyong, and Johnson in Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education listed objects modeling as their fourth direction for augmented reality in education. Their paper did not give as much attention to this direction as it did to the four other directions they highlighted. Still they did cite the example of researchers in the Human Interface Technology Laboratory at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand who developed an AR program that enabled users to convert two dimensional sketches into virtual three dimensional objects that can be manipulated to explore the interactions between the drawn objects. Again, Yuen, Yaoyuneyong, and Johnson were writing in 2011. Today, we find this technology readily available to teachers and students in the forms of Merge Cube and Quiver.

Skills Training
The fifth direction explained in Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education was skills training. In this section the authors wrote, “Augmented reality has strong potential to provide powerful contextual, in situ learning experiences and serendipitous exploration while simultaneously promoting the discovery of the connected nature of information in the real world.” They go on to cite three studies including a study of using AR for training military mechanics. The study revealed that mechanics using AR were able to locate tasks more quickly than those in non-AR environments. In all of the studies the participants wore augmented reality-enabled glasses.

Eight years after Augmented Reality: An Overview and Five Directions for AR in Education the potential for AR as an aid in improving training and in completing tasks is still strong. In promotion of the enterprise version of Google Glass, Google showcases AGCO’s study that indicated a 25% reduction in production time for complex assemblies when laborers used Google Glass. Google isn’t the only company producing augmented reality-enabled glasses. You’ll also find offerings from companies including Vuzix, Daqri, and Magic Leap. As it has been for decades, cost continues to be the biggest obstacle to use of AR-enabled glasses in K-12 classrooms. School districts that struggle to put $200 Chromebooks into the hands of every student aren’t going to be spending $1,000+ for AR-enabled glasses any time soon.

Monday, June 10, 2019

Interactive Versions of Aesop's Fables - And Dozens of Other Classic Works

The Library of Congress has tons of fantastic resources available for teachers and students, if you know where to find them. One of those great resources is an interactive version of Aesop's Fables.

Aesop's Fables interactive book from the Library of Congress is available to read on the Web, on an iPad, and on an Android device. The book contains more than 140 of Aesop's Fables for children. The level of interactivity varies widely depending upon which story you're reading. Some of the stories have truly interactive animations while other just have a small moving picture accompanying the fable.

Aesop's Fables isn't the only classic work available to read for free on the LOC's website. Head to the classic books section and you will find dozens of children's classics that you can read for free. In the collection you'll find books like A Apple Pie, Baseball ABC, and Peter Rabbit. It should be noted that Aesop's Fables is the only one available in an interactive version.

DocsTeach Adds Good Artifacts for Teaching About the Transcontinental Railroad

DocsTeach has long been one of my go-to recommendations for teachers of U.S. History. DocsTeach provides a wealth of digitized primary source artifacts that can be incorporated into lessons for elementary school, middle school, and high school students. You can search for those artifacts according to era in U.S. History, according to artifact type (text, photograph, map, audio, video), and you can search DocsTeach's library according by keyword. Speaking of keyword search, if you search for "transcontinental railroad" you'll find a collection of artifacts that were recently added to the DocsTeach library.

DocsTeach is more than just a collection of primary source artifacts for U.S. History teachers and students. DocsTeach offers thirteen templates that you can use to build interactive, online activities based upon the artifacts that you find in the DocsTeach library. Your students can complete the activities online without the need for an email address or account on DocsTeach. I wrote a fairly detailed overview of how to use the analysis template a couple of years ago. You can find that overview here.

While they're not exactly how-to videos, DocsTeach does have a small collection of recorded webinars in which you can see examples of how to use DocsTeach in your classroom. Those recorded webinars are available in this YouTube playlist.

Saturday, June 8, 2019

Geocaching, Green Screens, and Gmail - The Week in Review

Good evening from Maine where it was a perfect early summer day. It started with a bike ride which was followed by a trip to the playground with my daughters. Our day ended with getting ice cream! It was on the way to get ice cream that I noticed the pictured door that was labeled "not an exit," "not an entrance." That begs the question, is it even a door?

Wherever you are this weekend, I hope that you are also having a couple of fun days playing, discovering, and learning new things. If part of your weekend calls for catching up on some reading, I have this week's most popular posts for you.

These were the week's most popular posts:
1. Six Google Product Updates Made in May Impacting Teachers and Students
2. 7 Helpful and Convenient Gmail Settings You Might Be Overlooking
3. Moving From Google Drive to OneDrive
4. Try Mentimeter for Classroom Quiz Games
5. How to Measure Distances in Google Maps
6. 5 Things You Can Teach Through Geocaching
7. Veescope Live - A Free Green Screen App for Your iPad

Thank You for Your Support!

Friday, June 7, 2019

FAQs About Working With Me

Last week I published a list of my ten most popular professional development workshop topics. That post generated a handful of emails from folks who asked good questions about the structure of my workshop days, how to book me for a day, and fee structure. Here are the answers to those questions and more.

How to Book Me
I try to make this part as easy as possible for everyone. If you're interested in having me come to your school or conference, send me an email richardbyrne (at) freetech4teachers.com with the date(s) you have in mind and a little bit of information about your school/ conference. I'll get back to you right away to confirm availability and to schedule a quick call to talk about the needs of your school/ conference. Once we know we're a match for each other, I'll send you a simple contract that doesn't require a deposit to hold the date. That's it! I arrange all of the travel and lodging logistics for myself so that you don't have to worry about it.

Structure of a PD Day With Me
Just like students, every school faculty has different needs. That's why I always talk with you to identify your needs and desires for a workshop day with me. That said, a typical full-day workshop with me is six to seven hours that starts with a short overview of the day's goals followed by an introduction to the first hands-on activity of the day. Typically, there will be four or five hands-on activities that develop skills you can easily transfer to your classroom practice.

Fees
Like you, I have a mortgage to pay and kids to feed so I can't do this for free (yes, I appreciate the irony of having a site called Free Technology for Teachers but charging for workshops). That said, my fees are reasonable enough that past clients have told me that I should be charging more. For school-based professional development days I include all costs (travel, lodging, parking, etc.) in the quote that I provide because it makes it easier for you to budget and simpler for me to invoice.

Discounts
Professional development works best when it is on an on-going basis. That's why I extend significant discounts to schools and organizations who book me for two or more consecutive days or five or more total days in a school year.

Ready to Get Started?
Send me an email today at richardbyrne (at) freetech4teachers.com. Not the decision maker for your school's PD needs? Send this page to your department head, principal, tech director, or curriculum director.

This is Clickbait - A Lesson on Being a Discerning News Consumer

A couple of weeks ago TED-Ed released a video about spotting misleading headlines. I quickly added that lesson to my list of resources for helping students become discerning news consumers. This week TED-Ed released another video that I'm adding to that list of resources.

This One Weird Trick Will Help You Spot Clickbait is a TED-Ed video that teaches viewers how headlines are created to entice readers to click on an article. The video also explains how a small kernel of truth or a small and inconclusive study will be manipulated to create an article and clickbait headline.


Applications for Education
Extend this TED-Ed lesson by having students spend some time looking at a set of headlines and articles to spot the clickbait. Or have students try to create their own clickbait headlines based on short research studies that they find or that you provide to them.

Moving From Google Drive to OneDrive

In response to yesterday's post about moving files from one Google account to another, this morning I woke up to three emails from readers wondering about moving out of a Google (G Suite) environment and into a Microsoft environment. Fortunately, Google Takeout makes it relatively easy to move the contents of your Google Drive into Microsoft OneDrive. That process is demonstrated in my video that is embedded below.

Thursday, June 6, 2019

How to Archive Google Classroom - How to Remove Google Classroom Materials from Drive

As I mentioned in my previous post, I recently received an email from a reader who wanted to know what to do with Google Classroom classes and materials at the end of the school year. The first thing to do is to archive the class when you're certain that you won't be using it anymore. The second thing that you can do, but don't need to do, is remove the class folder and all associated materials from your Google Drive. Both of those processes are demonstrated in my video that is embedded below.

Moving Files From One Google Drive to Another

This week I received an email from a reader who asked about what how to move Google Drive items from a school account to a personal. That same reader also asked about how to handle Google Classroom materials at the end of the year (that's a question I'll address in my next post). In the following video I address how to move materials from a G Suite for Edu Google Drive to a personal Google Drive.



In short, you can either download your folders as ZIP files and then upload them to a different account or you can simply share the files between two accounts.

Veescope Live - A Free Green Screen App for Your iPad

Veescope Live is a free iPad app for creating green screen videos. Of the free iPad apps for making green screen videos that I've tried, including all of the most popular ones, Veescope Live is easiest to set-up and use even with the annoying quirk of menus not always closing on the first tap (and that might be a reflection of my iPad and not the app itself).

Even though it is a green screen video app, you can actually use the Veescope Live when recording against any flat, solid color backdrop. I was actually able to use it against the beige wall in my office, although it did work better when I used an actual green screen backdrop.

To get started with Veescope Live you do not need to create an account nor do you need to use an email address to use the app. Simply open the app and follow the clear directions to set-up the app for recording your green screen videos. Setting-up the app for recording is easier if you have your iPad standing up in a case or set in a tripod. That is because the app needs to take a steady image to set the color keying for your videos. The other part of the set-up that you should be prepared for is setting the white balance. Veescope Live will automatically set the white balance for you, but you do have to hold a blank white paper in front of the camera for a few seconds (tip: if you have white card stock, use that because it won't wiggle while you're holding it the way that standard paper does).

Once you have Veescope Live set-up on your iPad it's time to start recording. But before you hit the record button, select the background or backgrounds that you want to appear in front of. Veescope Live provides a gallery of background images and videos that you can use. The app will also let you import images and video clips to use as backgrounds (check out Pixabay or Pexels for free images and videos). After selecting your background you're ready to record your video. Recordings are automatically saved to your iPad's camera roll.

Veescope Live is free to use to record and to trim your videos. The free version of the app will put a watermark on your video (small, but noticeable). The paid version of the app ($2.99) removes the watermarking. Since all of the videos you record in Veescope Live are saved to your iPad's camera roll, you can quickly import them into iMovie to combine them with other media clips that you have on your iPad.

Applications for Education
Green screen apps like Veescope Live are great for students to use to create their own newscast videos or weather report videos. The app could also be used by students to create "world tour" videos in which they place themselves in front of landmarks and report on the places that viewers see in the video. 



Wednesday, June 5, 2019

5 Things You Can Teach Through Geocaching

Geocaching is one of the things that I spend a good bit of time talking about in both my workshop and in my webinar 5 Ways to Blend Technology Into Outdoor Learning. Geocaching is a great activity to do to get kids outside for hands-on learning experiences. Here are five things that you can teach through geocaching activities.

Geospatial Awareness
The core of geocaching activities is locating hidden caches. This can be done through the use of GPS (either on a phone, a smartwatch, or on a dedicated GPS unit) or in an "old school" method of using maps. Finding a cache can require students to have an understanding of the distance between two or more places.

Cardinal Direction
Do your students know in which direction to turn if you tell them to walk north? Teach them about cardinal direction through geocaching activities. You can set up geocaching activities in and around your school yard that don't require students to use any electronic devices. Simply make a map or make a list of clues that give students information about the directions and distances they need to go in order to find a series of caches.

Earth Science
Let students test use their knowledge of rock types or plant types as they seek geocaches. You can incorporate a little civic duty into the lesson by asking students to pick up litter they find while geocaching.

Citizenship
If you or your students use the official Geocaching website to find caches in your area, you may find some that border on private property. This is an opportunity to teach students about respecting the property of others. Another opportunity to teach a lesson about citizenship is found in playing by the rules of geocaching. For example, students shouldn't move caches they've found.

Digital Citizenship
As with any activity that incorporates an online, public-facing component participating in official Geocaching activities provides us with a good opportunity to review the basics of good digital citizenship. Students who are placing caches for inclusion on the public listings of Geocaches need to be mindful of not including personally identifying and other sensitive information in their descriptions and hints.

Bonus item: It's hard for me to talk about geocaching without thinking about a couple of classic "geography songs." Enjoy!


Try Mentimeter for Classroom Quiz Games

Mentimeter is one of the tools that I regularly feature when talking about gathering realtime, online feedback from students. It's a great platform for quick, informal polls. Mentimeter is also great for making fun quiz games to use for review activities in your classroom.

Mentimeter lets you create slides that then become the basis of your quiz game. You can have multiple choice and open-response quiz questions in your slides. The responses to each question can be displayed in a variety of ways including bar graphs, word clouds, and heat maps.

If you don't have time to build an entirely new quiz game from scratch, Mentimeter has a large gallery of pre-made games that you can import into your account. Once you have imported a game you can play it as written or modify it to suit your needs.

In the following video I provide an overview of how to use Mentimeter to create and play quiz games in your classroom.

Monday, June 3, 2019

How to Measure Distances in Google Maps

A couple of weeks ago in the Practical Ed Tech newsletter I featured ten ways to use Google Earth in your classroom for more than just social studies lessons. Many of the ideas in that list can also be applied to the web browser version Google Maps. A good example of that is found in Tom Barrett's Maths Maps. Maths Maps is series of activities designed to help elementary school students develop an understanding of distance, scale, and units of measurement. To complete the activities students have to use the measuring tool in Google Maps. In the following video I demonstrate how to measure distances in the current browser version of Google Maps.

7 Helpful and Convenient Gmail Settings You Might Be Overlooking

Last week I published a post about using Gmail's confidential mode and a post about automatically forwarding G Suite email to a personal Gmail account. Those posts led to "I didn't know you could do that" comments from a few readers. So to continue with that theme, here are some other helpful Gmail (and G Suite for Edu mail) settings that you might be overlooking.

Canned Responses
Do you find yourself answering the same question over and over again? Or sending the same type of message many times a week or day? If so, you need to take advantage of the canned responses option in Gmail. My tutorial on how to use it is included below.



Smart Replies
Smart Replies are similar to canned responses in that they can help you reply to messages a bit quicker with a bit less typing. Smart Replies predict what you want to type in response to a message. If the prediction is correct, simply tap the tab button on your keyboard to insert the predicted text. My video on how to use Smart Replies is embedded below.



Block or Filter Senders
Do you want to make sure that you save all of the staff meeting notes that your principal sends out? Want a better way to sort all of those sales emails from Target? Would you like to create a special place for "helpful" emails from your mother-in-law? If you said "yes" to any of these questions, you should learn how to create filters and or block incoming messages. In the following video I demonstrate how to do that.



Undo Send
Have you ever hit "send" just a moment too soon? If so, you should enable the option to undo sent messages. How to do that is explained in the video below.



Offline Access
Can't live without 24/7, 365 access to your inbox? You can make your Gmail messages available offline. (By the way, it is possible to live without 24/7, 365 inbox access).



Contact Groups
Don't manually enter the email addresses of all of the people to whom you need to send the same message. Create a contact group and send the message to everyone in that group with just a couple of clicks.



Dictate Your Email Messages
Email Pro Dictation is a free Chrome extension that you can use to dictate messages. It's easy to install and use on your Windows, Mac, or Chrome OS laptop.

Saturday, June 1, 2019

How to Automatically Send G Suite Email to a Gmail Address - And How to Filter Your Email

The end of the school year is here for many of us. It is at this time of year that I am often asked about how to forward G Suite for Edu email to Gmail addresses. Some people want to do this because they only want to check one inbox during the summer. Others do this because they are moving from one district to another and need a place to store important messages in the time between jobs. In the following video I explain how to automatically forward G Suite email to a Gmail address.


If you don't want to forward work email to your personal email, you might consider using filters so that only the most important messages reach your primary inbox during the summer. Watch my video that is embedded below to learn how to create filters in your G Suite inbox.

Copyright, Ethics, and Gmail - The Week in Review

Good morning from Maine where it almost feels like summer. The sun is trying to poke through the clouds and it's supposed to be 70F today. In other words, it should be a great day to play outside. That's exactly what I plan to do after publishing this blog post. I hope that wherever you are this weekend, you can enjoy some time outside too.

Before jumping to the list of the week's most popular posts I want to remind you that there are two Practical Ed Tech courses starting next week. Those courses are Teaching History With Technology and Getting Going With G Suite.

These were the week's most popular posts:
1. Three Lessons to Learn from the $9.2M Copyright Ruling Against Houston ISD
2. How to Use Gmail's Confidential Mode
3. Six Google Product Updates Made in May Impacting Teachers and Students
4. The Ethics of Making Copies of "View Only" Google Docs
5. Four Ways to Show & Share Videos Without Distractions
6. Canva Has Acquired Pixabay and Pexels - Five Ways to Use Canva
7. Three Good Resources to Help Students Become Discerning News Consumers

Thank You for Your Support!