Friday, September 9, 2022

A New Kind of Flashcard - Flexcards!

I started this week by sharing my favorite alternative to Quizlet. To end the school week I have a new kind of flashcard to share with you as an alternative to Quizlet. That new kind of flashcard is called Flexcards by Flippity

Flexcards are multimedia flashcards that can have up to ten sides. You can display videos, pictures, links, and text on your Flexcards. For example, in this demo you'll see that the Flexcards for ten countries of the world include the capital of those countries, maps of each, images of the flags for each, YouTube videos about the countries, brief summaries of each, and links to additional information. 

In this new video I demonstrate how to create your own Flexcards by using the Google Sheets template provided by Flippity. 



Applications for Education
Regular two-sided flashcards are fine for practicing recall of definitions or math facts. Flexcards are something that students should try when they need to study a bit more than just definitions or simple facts. 

The Differences Between England, Great Britain, United Kingdom, and the Commonwealth Explained

Queen Elizabeth II died yesterday. The news broke after most on the east coast of the U.S. were out of school for the day. If you find your students asking questions about about her passing, the monarchy, or Great Britain in general, here are some videos that you might find helpful. 

The Washington Post published a short video that uses a lot of archival pictures and newsreels to tell the story of her 70 year reign



The Washington Post also published a two minute compilation of how the news of Queen Elizabeth II's death was reported by news outlets around the world.



A decade ago C.G.P. Grey published The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained. It's a still a great video that explains the differences between the three, and why some people incorrectly use them interchangeably.



Many of the news stories about Queen Elizabeth II's passing make references to the Commonwealth. If you find yourself trying to explain what that is to your students, here's a brief explanation from the BBC that could help.