Showing posts with label Art History. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Art History. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

A Tour of Google Arts and Culture for Teachers

Last week Google introduced Learn With Google Arts and Culture. Learn With Google Arts and Culture is a collection of lesson plans, Street View imagery, and virtual tours based around the content found in Google Arts and Culture

Other than the collection of lesson plans, there isn't anything in Learn With Google Arts and Culture that you couldn't find on your own by just going to the main Google Arts and Culture website. In fact, in some cases I found it easier to find what I was looking for by just going to the main site instead of going through the learning page. 

The lesson plans are what make Learn With Google Arts and Culture worth bookmarking. There are two dozen detailed lesson plans available through Learn With Google Arts and Culture. The lesson plans are very detailed and include links for students and teachers to follow. Much of each lesson plan that I reviewed could be completed by students working independently. 

In this new video I provide an overview of Learn With Google Arts and Culture. The overview includes:

  • How to access the lesson plans. 
  • How to share specific portions of Google Arts and Culture in your Google Classroom. 
  • How to create collections of artifacts from Google Arts and Culture to share with your students. 

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Explore the Royal Academy of Arts in Google's Arts & Culture Apps

Google's Arts & Culture site and corresponding apps make it possible for students of all ages to virtually explore thousands of fascinating landmarks and works of art. This morning Google announced a new collection with the Arts & Culture site. That collection features the Royal Academy of Arts.

The highlight of the Royal Academy of Arts collection within Google Arts & Culture is a collection of 31 online exhibits. The exhibits tell the stories of the artists and art showcased in the Royal Academy of Arts collections. You can also take a virtual tour through the Academy and some of the galleries. Visitors can navigate through the tour much like navigating in Google Street View imagery.


Applications for Education
Google Arts & Culture is, obviously, a great resource for art teachers who want to give their students opportunities to explore great works of art from around the world. It's also a good resource for social studies teachers who are looking to have their students make connections between events they learn about in their classes and how those events have been depicted through various forms of art over the years.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Gallery AR - Augmented Reality Art on Your Walls

Gallery AR is a free iPad app and free iPhone app that anyone can use to view classic works of art in augmented reality. The app features art work that was digitized by The Art Institute of Chicago.

Gallery AR digitally displays works of art on your walls when you point your phone or iPad at it. Works appear to be chosen at random, but you can swap them out with another work by tapping the reset icon in the app. You zoom in on the art work by walking closer to the wall in front of you.

In my testing of Gallery AR I found it to be a bit sensitive to changes in lighting. In fact, the app didn't display anything until I turned on every light in my office and opened the shades to let in sunlight. In fairness to the developer, I have the same problem with the augmented reality function in the Google Arts & Culture app.

Applications for Education
Gallery AR could be a nice app for art teachers to recommend to students who are currently at home and looking for a new way to experience classic works of art. The app is free and doesn't require any registration to use and doesn't offer any confusing in-app purchases.

Monday, November 26, 2018

Nearly 900 Free Art History Books - And an Art Lesson

Around this time five years ago I discovered that the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts free online art history texts. A recent Tweet from Open Culture reminded me of that collection. Today, I revisited that collection and discovered that it has expanded to 569 volumes. All of the books can be read online or downloaded as PDFs (warning, some of them are massive files). You can search through the catalog of books by thematic category, format, and publication type. And, of course, you can search through the books by title, author, and keyword.

The Getty Museum also has a large collection of art books available online for free. That collection currently has put 325 art books available for anyone to read online and or download. You can find all of these books in the Getty Publications Virtual Library. You can search through the collection by author, keyword, or title. Alternatively, you can simply browse the collections. All of the free books are also available through Google Books.

And on a related note, TED-Ed recently published a new video lesson titled Who Decides What Art Means?

Friday, May 11, 2018

A Google Maps and Earth Activity for Art Classes

When I conduct workshops on Google Maps and Google Earth I always point out that the uses for those tools extend beyond the realm of geography and history. One example of using Google Maps and Earth outside of the typical geography setting is using Google Maps and Earth to have students place art and artists on an interactive map.

Students can map the locations of where a piece of art is housed, where it was created, where the artist lived, and the places that inspired the artist. Each placemark on a student's map could include a picture of the artwork, a picture of the artist, and or a video about the art and artist. To provide a complete picture a student can include text and links to more information about the art and artist.

This project can be accomplished by using either Google's My Maps (formerly Maps Engine Lite), Google Earth Tour Builder, or Google Earth. My recommendation for teachers and students who are new to creating multimedia maps is to start out with either Google My Maps on a Chromebook or Google Earth Tour Builder on a Mac or PC. Click here for a tutorial on Google's My Maps service.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Monet Was Here - Take a Google Earth Tour of Monet's Works

Monet Was Here is a new exhibit on Google Arts & Culture. The exhibit coincides with the opening of a new Monet exhibit at the National Gallery London. The Monet Was Here online exhibit features works that are on display at National Gallery London and other museums around the world.

Monet Was Here includes a Google Earth tour that you can view right now in the browser-based version of Google Earth. The tour has eight stops in it. Each stop displays one of Monet's works next to a current view of the location that inspired the work.

Monday, January 15, 2018

X Degrees of Separation - The Connections Between Artworks

The big news over the last few days about Google's Arts & Culture app has focused on people using the app to find their doppelgangers in the museum collections digitized by Google. While it is a neat feature, there are other Google Arts & Culture experiments worth trying. One of those is called X Degrees of Separation.

X Degrees of Separation lets you select two works of art in the Google Arts & Culture collection and then see works that can connect them. The purpose of X Degrees of Separation appears to be to show viewers how cultures can be connected through art. Each image that appears in the connections is linked to an individual page that will include a bit of information about the work. Depending upon the work that you've selected you may not get much more information than the artist's name and the museum in which the work is displayed. None-the-less, X Degrees of Separation is an interesting project.

Applications for Education
X Degrees of Separation could be a good jumping-off point for an art history lesson. Have students pick two artworks and see the connections. Since the connections are displayed as just images with minimal background information, have students research the connecting works and then create explanations of how the works are connected.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Student Stories Drawings in ClassDojo

Student Stories is ClassDojo's student portfolio tool that they launched around this time last year. A few weeks ago I gave a run-down of new features that are going to be added to ClassDojo's Student Stories tool for the new school year. One of those features is an option for students to draw or annotate images in their portfolios. That feature is now live and ready for your students to use.

Applications for Education
Drawing on an image in a portfolio can be a good way for students to highlight the most important parts of an picture or of a diagram. In an art history lesson you could have students take a picture of a famous work and then use the drawing tool in Student Stories to highlight the techniques used by the artist.

Monday, December 19, 2016

One Image Inspires a Lesson

This is a guest post from Rushton Hurley. Rushton is the founder of Next Vista for Learning, a great place to find and share educational videos.

Imagine starting class without saying anything. The students look at you, awaiting something. You wait long enough to catch their attention, and then project this image in front of them:
Image source: Rushton Hurley https://www.instagram.com/p/BOIHTiEFzz4/

You then speak up, asking the class to take a close look at the sculpture, and in pairs, come up with at least three connections between what they see and what was covered in the last class. Let them know that truly cool answers earn style points, which aren't factored into their grades, but are a good thing to have earned, anyway.

It's not that your last class is expected to have covered Tang Dynasty sculpture. In fact, the idea is that you didn't. What you want is for the students to actively talk with each other about what you covered last without your having to say, "Okay class, let's review what we covered yesterday."

In other words, make learning a little more active, a little more creative, and a little more fun with an image. Any image that doesn't get you fired is probably okay. Hopefully they'll come up with some cool connections!

Monday, September 19, 2016

View 3500+ Art Exhibitions Online

Thanks to Open Culture I have just learned about the Museum of Modern Art's new website that showcases artwork from the more than 3500 exhibitions that have been held at MoMA since its founding in 1929.

MoMA's Exhibition History site lets you browse through the highlights of every exhibition that has ever been on display at MoMA. You can search for exhibitions according to artist's name, type of exhibition, and or decade of display. It is also possible to perform a keyword search and see all exhibitions related to that keyword. Once you land on an exhibition you can read the press releases that accompanied the exhibition, a list of artists and the works in the exhibition, and view images of the exhibition.

Not every exhibit is available in its entirety online. Some of the film exhibitions that I viewed only had text descriptions. I assume that this is due to licensing rights associated with the films.

Applications for Education
MoMA's Exhibition History site could be a good resource for art teachers who are looking for examples to share with students. With older students you might let them browse some of the collections to find a favorite artist then jump into research about that person.

Due to the varied and occasionally controversial nature of MoMA exhibitions, I would not recommend letting younger students search the site without direct supervision.

Friday, September 2, 2016

Smarthistory Offers a Crash Course in Art History

Smarthistory offers is a free online alternative to expensive art history textbooks. Smarthistory features more than just images of notable works of art. The combination of video lessons, text articles, and audio lessons about eras and themes in art history is what makes Smarthistory a valuable resource. Students can browse all of the resources of Smarthistory by artist name, style of work, theme, or time period. Smarthistory was originally developed by art history professors Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker.

A glossary of art history terms on Smarthistory can help students understand the key talking points in the video lessons available on Smarthistory. Those video lessons are arranged into three main sections; "first things first," "tools for understanding art," and "materials + techniques." Within each section you will find six to twenty videos on subtopics.

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Most Popular of 2015 - Read and Download 250+ Art Books from the Getty Museum

As I do every year, I am taking this week to relax, recharge, and ski with friends. While I'm away I will be re-running the most popular posts of the year. This was one of the most popular posts in January, 2015.

Six months ago I shared with you the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of nearly 400 free art history books. Now the Getty Museum has put more than 250 art books online for anyone to read online and or download. You can find all of these books in the Getty Publications Virtual Library. You can search through the collection by author, keyword, or title. Alternatively, you can simply browse the collections. All of the free books are also available on Google Books. In fact, I've used Google Books to embed one of the books below.


Applications for Education 
The Getty Publications Virtual Library could be a great resource for art teachers and their students. Students who are researching artists and or art movements could consult the collection to find reference materials.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Nearly 700 Art History Books to Read Online for Free

Last night on the Free Technology for Teacher Facebook page I posted a set of resources for art lesson plans. That post reminded me of a couple of sources of free art history books that together offer nearly 700 books.

 The Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts 437 art history books online. All of the books can be read online or downloaded as PDFs (warning, some of them are massive files). You can search through the catalog of books by thematic category, format, and publication type. And, of course, you can search through the books by title, author, and keyword.

The Getty Museum has put more than 250 art books online for anyone to read online and or download. You can find all of these books in the Getty Publications Virtual Library. You can search through the collection by author, keyword, or title. Alternatively, you can simply browse the collections. All of the free books are also available on Google Books.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Discover Art Whenever You Open a New Chrome Tab

Over the last few years Google has put thousands of fantastic works of art online for everyone to explore in the Google Cultural Institute. The Google Art Project Chrome extension features a different piece of art each time you open a new tab in Chrome. Should you see a work of art that intrigues you, you can click through it to learn more about in the Google Cultural Institute.

Applications for Education
The Google Art Project Chrome extension isn't going to change the way you teach, but it might expose some students to artworks that they would not have otherwise seen. That exposure might inspire them to learn a bit more about art.

Friday, November 14, 2014

Putting Art On the Map - A Google Maps and Earth Activity

When I conduct workshops on Google Maps and Google Earth I always point out that the uses for those tools extend beyond the realm of geography and history. I was reminded of that point by reading a recent post on Maps Mania. That post featured maps of art galleries around the world. A variation on that theme would have students creating maps of art and artists around the world.

Students can map the locations of where a piece of art is housed, where it was created, where the artist lived, and the places that inspired the artist. Each placemark on a student's map could include a picture of the artwork, a picture of the artist, and or a video about the art and artist. To provide a complete picture a student can include text and links to more information about the art and artist.

This project can be accomplished by using either Google's My Maps (formerly Maps Engine Lite), Google Earth Tour Builder, or Google Earth. My recommendation for teachers and students who are new to creating multimedia maps is to start out with either Google My Maps on a Chromebook or Google Earth Tour Builder on a Mac or PC. Click here for a tutorial on Google's My Maps service. Click here for a tutorial on Google Earth Tour Builder.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

MoMA Presents Five Tips for Teaching With Works of Art

Earlier today I spent some time revisiting resources for teaching art history and art appreciation lessons. One of those resources is the Museum of Modern Art's learning page. A featured resource on MoMA Learning is this video containing five tips for teaching with works of art. The video not only lists the tips, it contains examples of using these tips to teach art history and art appreciation lessons to students. The video is embedded below.


One of the other excellent resources on MoMA Learning is this glossary of art terms. In many cases the definitions in the glossary contain links to multiple examples of each term.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Views of Venice - Art Added to Street View Imagery of Venice

Keir Clarke, owner of Google Maps Mania, has created a neat mashup of art and Street View imagery. Views of Venice allows you to see artwork depicting scenes of Venice layered over current Street View imagery of Venice. To access the imagery just click on the menu button on Views of Venice to choose a piece of art and see it in its geo-located context.

Applications for Education
Views of Venice reminds me a bit of the concept behind History Pin in which historical imagery is added to Google Maps Street View. Views of Venice only contains fourteen images at this time. It is still a good example of how Google Maps can be used to provide greater context for students when they are learning about art and artifacts. You could have students learn about the geographical and context of art by having them add images to Google Maps placemarks through Google Maps Engine Lite.

30,000+ Images of Art and Artifacts to Download and Re-use for Free

The Museum of New Zealand recently released more than 30,000 images of art and artifacts to download and re-use for free. The images are a mix of public domain images and images labeled with a Creative Commons license. The museum makes it easy to determine how an image is licensed. To determine the licensing of an image simply click on the download button and the next page clearly shows the license for the image.


Finding images in the Museum of New Zealand's gallery isn't the most intuitive process. You can enter a keyword to search, but if you're too specific you might not find what you're looking for. For example, enter "fish" and scroll through the results rather than entering "salmon" or "trout" to find images of fish. The other way to search is to open the advanced search settings in which you can choose a collection to browse through.

Applications for Education
My first thought about this collection was that it could be another place for students to look for images to use in presentations that they create. As I spent more time exploring the collection I realized that there are many images of cultural artifacts and images of archeological artifacts that could be useful as instructional aids in history and art history courses.

H/T to Open Culture

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Try the Getty Search Gateway to Find Neat Historical Images (More Than 85,000 of Them)

A Cow Grazing
Adriaen van de Velde
Image Source: J. Paul Getty Museum
Earlier this year I shared 250+ Art Books from the Getty Museum. Now you can find more than 85,000 free images through the Getty Museum's Open Content Program. You can download and re-use the images as long as you give proper attribution for the source of the image (see my image caption for an example).

Use the Getty Search Gateway to find images in the Getty Museum's Open Content Program. The Getty Search Gateway allows you to filter your search according to material type, topic, name, source, and location. Once you find an image, click the image's title to be taken to its landing page where you can learn more about it, get the required attribution information, and learn more about the history of your chosen image.

Applications for Education
The Getty's Open Content Program could be a good source of images to use in art history lessons. The Getty Search Gateway could also be a good place for students to find images to use in multimedia presentations. In fact, I'm going to add it to my list of recommended places for students to find free images.

H/T to Open Culture and Larry Ferlazzo

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Visit The Morgan Library Online to See the Notes & Sketches of Famous Authors and Artists

The Morgan Library & Museum's online offerings include more than 30 collections of sketches, notes, and photographs from famous authors and artists. One of my favorite collections offered online by The Morgan Library & Museum is Mark Twain: A Skeptic's Progress.

Mark Twain: A Skeptic's Progress is a collection of Twain's handwritten letters, sketches, and story drafts. All twenty-two of those items are displayed in a viewer that will allow you to zoom in and see the detail on each piece of paper. The online exhibit also includes a collection of photographs of Twain at home.

Applications for Education
Before, after, or while they are working their way through Huckleberry Finn or Tom Sawyer have your students explore Mark Twain: A Skeptic's Progress to help them understand Mark Twain's way of thinking and how that influenced his writing.