Showing posts with label Art History. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Art History. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Read and Download 250+ Art Books from the Getty Museum

Six months ago I shared with you the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of nearly 400 free art history books. Now the Getty Museum has put more than 250 art books online for anyone to read online and or download. You can find all of these books in the Getty Publications Virtual Library. You can search through the collection by author, keyword, or title. Alternatively, you can simply browse the collections. All of the free books are also available on Google Books. In fact, I've used Google Books to embed one of the books below.


Applications for Education 
The Getty Publications Virtual Library could be a great resource for art teachers and their students. Students who are researching artists and or art movements could consult the collection to find reference materials.

H/T to Open Culture

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

390 Free Online Art History Books

Earlier this year I discovered that the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts free online art history texts. Today, I revisited that collection and discovered that it has expanded to 390 volumes. All of the books can be read online or downloaded as PDFs (warning, some of them are massive files). You can search through the catalog of books by thematic category, format, and publication type. And, of course, you can search through the books by title, author, and keyword.

Applications for Education
The Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of art history books could be a great resource for art teachers and their students. Students who are researching artists and or art movements could consult the collection to find reference materials.

Explore 5,400 New Artifacts In the Google Cultural Institute

The Google Cultural Institute is one of my favorite sites for students in history, geography, and art courses. The online exhibitions in the Google Cultural Institute feature images, videos, audio, and text about significant historical and cultural people, places, and events. Some of the exhibitions like the Eiffel Tower Exhibition incorporate the use of Google Maps Street View imagery too.

Last week Google announced the addition of 5,400 new artifacts to the Cultural Institute. There is a strong emphasis on art and fashion in the new content added to the Cultural Institute. Some of the new content includes quilts from the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg, kimonos from Japan, children's art from Norway, and interior tours of art museums in China.

Applications for Education
The Google Cultural Institute is a great site to have students explore to view artwork, find answers to questions, and have new questions and curiosities sparked in their minds.

Friday, October 4, 2013

Art Babble - Videos and Lessons In Art History

Art Babble is an excellent resource for art history students and teachers. I initially reviewed the site almost four years ago. Since then it has expanded and had an interface makeover that makes it better than ever.

Art Babble is a video website designed and maintained by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The purpose of Art Babble is to provide a place for people to learn about the creation of art, artists, and collections through quality video productions. Visitors to Art Babble will find videos related to many forms of and formats for art. Browse the video channels and you'll find videos covering a wide array of topics including abstract art, European Art and Design, African Art, graphic design, glass, sculpture, surrealism, and much more.

Applications for Education
Art Babble has a section devoted to videos to help kids understand the significance of a select of famous paintings. Art Babble also has a section devoted to lessons that teachers can use in their classrooms and or on field trips to art galleries.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

Learn Art History With Smarthistory

One of the most popular posts of the last week was 372 Free Art History Books. Writing that post reminded me of a resource that I reviewed three years ago, Smarthistory.

Smarthistory is a free online alternative to expensive art history textbooks. Smarthistory features more than just images of notable works of art. The combination of video lessons, text articles, and audio lessons about eras and themes in art history is what makes Smarthistory a valuable resource. Students can browse all of the resources of Smarthistory by artist name, style of work, theme, or time period. Smarthistory was originally developed by art history professors Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker. Smarthistory is now partnered with Khan Academy to deliver lessons via video.

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

372 Free Art History Books

Over the weekend I shared 25,000 free images of art that anyone can download. In that post I suggested that the images may be useful in art history lessons. This afternoon I discovered that The Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts 372 art history books online. All of the books can be read online or downloaded as PDFs (warning, some of them are massive files). You can search through the catalog of books by thematic category, format, and publication type. And, of course, you can search through the books by title, author, and keyword.

Applications for Education
The Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of art history books could be a great resource for art teachers and their students. Students who are researching artists and or art movements could consult the collection to find reference materials.

Sunday, June 16, 2013

25,000 Images of Art That You Can Re-use for Free

The U.S. National Gallery of Art hosts more than 25,000 images of famous and not-so-famous works of art. Nearly all of the images can be downloaded and re-used for free. NGA Images also allows you to register and create online collections of images. The collections are called lightboxes.

When you find an image in NGA Images click on the magnifying glass icon to enlarge it and learn more about it. Clicking the magnifying glass icon launches a pop-up box that contains an enlargement of the image, information about the artist who created the artwork, and an option to search for related images.

Applications for Education
Using the related images search option in NGA Images could be a good way for students to discover lesser-known artists who produced art similar to that of their more famous contemporaries. Of course, being able to download the images means that your students could use them in slide presentations and videos about artists and styles of art.

H/T to Open Culture.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Check Out the New Look of the Google Art Project

The Google Art Project is one of my favorite offerings from Google that isn't a productivity tool. The Google Art Project features artwork from dozens of famous museums all over the world. The Google Art Project takes inside the museum with Street View imagery. This week the Google Art Project received some updates that make it easier to find works of art. You can now search according to artist, location, and date. Watch the video below for an overview of how to use the site.


Applications for Education
The latest version of the Google Art Project includes an option to compare two works of art. There is still an option to create your own artwork collection while visiting each museum. Have your students combine the use of these tools to compare works of art as part of analysis/ critique assignments.

Thursday, May 2, 2013

A Short Course on the Origins of Writing

Hieroglyphics? Sanskrit? What are the origins of written language? Some answers to that last question are presented in the TED Ed lesson Who Invented Writing? The video is embedded below.


Applications for Education
This video could be part of a short lesson on the development of civilizations. The video might also be of interest to art teachers to share with students learning about typography and calligraphy. 

H/T to Brain Pickings

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Use Google+ Hangouts for a Virtual Scavenger Hunt in the Palace of Versailles

This is definitely one of the coolest uses of Google+ that I have seen in a long time. Hangout Quest is a Google+ game that allows you to go on a virtual scavenger hunt inside the Palace of Versailles. The object of the scavenger hunt is to find artwork and other objects in the palace. If you invite others to your Hangout you can compete against them in a race to find the objects first.

Hangout Quest uses the Street View imagery of Google Maps to bring you inside the Palace of Versailles. Another cool piece of technology added to Hangout Quest is facial tracking. The facial tracking technology allows you to move around in the Palace of Versailles by just moving your head instead of clicking around with your mouse.


See Hangout Quest in action in the video below.

Applications for Education
I think that now that Google+ in available within Google Apps for Education the opportunities to use it for educational purposes will continue to expand. Hangout Quest could be a great activity for an art history or art appreciation class. Extend the game by adding a research component to it after students have completed the quest.

Big thanks to Google Maps Mania for this one.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Explore the Google Cultural Institute

The Google Cultural Institute launched 42 new online historical exhibitions yesterday. The new exhibitions feature images, documents, and artifacts from some of the most significant cultural events of the last one hundred years. The exhibitions are built as interactive slideshows that you can scroll and click through to discover the artifacts and stories.

Applications for Education
The new historical exhibitions in the Google Cultural Institute and to some of Google's other resources like the World Wonders and Art Project. These resources can be used to spark a student's curiosity about a topic. As a supplement to your lessons these resources are excellent too.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Discover the World's Great Art on Art.sy

Artsy is a new site that has indexed thousands of works of art that you can view online. Art.sy allows you to browse for artworks according to medium, style, subject matter, movement, or region in which the art is produced. Once you've found an artwork that you like, Art.sy helps you find more by suggesting related works. And if you're in the market for some new artwork to decorate your home or office Art.sy can help you find works that are for sale.

Applications for Education
Artsy could be a nice resource for use art history and art appreciation courses. Students can use Art.sy to discover new-to-them artists by following the suggestions that accompany the more famous artists and works with which they may already familiar.

H/T to Open Culture

Monday, April 2, 2012

Humanline - Thousands of Historic Images

Humanline is a nice resource for locating historic images. Humanline's galleries are arranged according to topic. You can browse the collections according to topic or search the collections by keyword. The topics are architecture, archeology, history, anthropology, people, lifestyle, religion, and engineering.

Humanline's images are available to educators and students for free re-use provided that the attribution guidelines are followed. There are two licensing agreements that users need to be aware of when attributing the works they're re-using. Those licenses are rights-managed and royalty-free. You do need to register as an education user to access all of the images for free.

Applications for Education
Humanline's galleries could be useful for developing history and art lessons. The images could be used by educators and students as visual aids in a presentation. The images could also be the starting point of a research project about a particular artist, topic, or theme in history.

H/T to David Kapuler

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

7 Good Resources for Art Teachers and Students

I was recently contacted by a reader who wanted to know what I had in my archives for art lessons and digital art galleries that students can access. While this isn't every visual art resource in my archive, these are seven of my personal favorites.

The Art Project powered by Google features interior tours of seventeen world famous art museums. Select a museum from the list on the homepage and you can virtually tour it using the same interface style you experience in Google Maps Streetview. Inside the museum just double click to zoom to a location. You can also open a floor plan overview and click on a room to navigate to that part of the museum. The best part of the Art Project powered by Google is the option to create your own artwork collection while visiting each museum. As you're touring a museum click on the "+" symbol on any work of art see it in greater detail, to add it to your collection, and to open background information about that work of art. To create a collection you must be signed into your Google account.

Smarthistory is a free online alternative to expensive art history textbooks. Smarthistory was developed by art history professors Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker. Smarthistory features more than just images of notable works of art. Videos lessons, VoiceThread lessons, and audio lessons about eras and themes in art history are what make Smarthistory a valuable resource. Students can browse all of the resources of Smarthistory by artist name, style of work, theme, or time period. Smarthistory is now partnered with Khan Academy to deliver lessons.

Picturing America is a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. Picturing America is an interactive gallery of artwork related to events, people, and themes in American history. You can browse the gallery chronologically or by theme. Click on any image in the gallery to learn about the artist and the artwork itself. Along with the background information for each image, Picturing America provides links to additional resources for learning about the artwork and artists.

The World Digital Library hosts nearly 5,000 primary documents and images from collections around the world. Sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the mission of the World Digital Library is to promote the study and understanding of cultures. The WDL can be searched by date, era, country, continent, topic, and type of resource. In my search of the WDL I noticed that roughly half of the resources are historical maps and images. The WDL aims to be accessible to as many people as possible by providing search tools and content descriptions in seven languages. The WDL can also be searched by clicking through the map on the homepage.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has a great collection of multimedia, interactive features about art and artists. In these features you can learn about styles of art, specific works, and the artists. There is a mix of videos and slideshows contained in the interactive archive. The archive contains features about Picasso and Pollock as well as artists whose works aren't quite as famous.

Art Babble is a video website designed and maintained by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The purpose of Art Babble is to provide a place for people to learn about the creation of art, artists, and collections through quality video productions. Visitors to Art Babble will find videos related to many forms of and formats for art. Browse the video channels and you'll find videos covering a wide array of topics including abstract art, European Art and Design, African Art, graphic design, glass, sculpture, surrealism, and much more.

MOOM, the Museum of Online Museums, is a list of museums that offer online exhibitions. In some cases the museums include virtual tours and in other cases the museums online exhibits are simple photo galleries. Some of the notable museums featured in the Museum of Online Museums include the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Friday, March 2, 2012

Interactive Lessons About Art and Artists

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has a great collection of multimedia, interactive features about art and artists. In these features you can learn about styles of art, specific works, and the artists. There is a mix of videos and slideshows contained in the interactive archive. The archive contains features about Picasso and Pollock as well as artists whose works aren't quite as famous.

Applications for Education
Art Think is a SFMOMA feature designed to introduce visitors to basics of art. Art Think contains a glossary terms and an introduction to basic uses of shapes, lines, and colors. Art Think also contains an index of dozens of lesson plans that teachers can use in the instruction of art appreciation. The lessons incorporate materials that are featured on the SFMOMA website.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

The Arts and History - Part 2

Cover scan of ''The Americans''
1969 2nd printing
from Wikipedia
Robert Frank is one of my favorite photographers - I discovered The Americans in a History of Photography class as an undergrad, and it has resonated with me ever since. Back in the Fall semester of 2009 I was able to take a group of students to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the collected photographs of The Americans on display. Here is a story NPR produced about that show, and here is another. This one is from The New Yorker. You get the idea.

When this show was on display, the creators of Selected Shorts aired a program comprised of short stories written by authors who were inspired by a particular photograph from the Frank show. You can download the podcast of the stories being read and have students listen to the readings as part of an examination of the photographs. They could choose their own photograph to be the inspiration for their own creative writing or research or select work from a different photographer or genre all together to inspire their writing. Lots of possibilities!

In a history or American Studies class, these (or any) photographs can be used to identify important moments in US history and the array of perspectives from which the event can be understood. My students used photographs as the starting point for researching and writing historical fiction; working in groups, they shared the historical event which was the focus of their stories, but each author developed a narrator with a unique perspective on that particular event in history.



Here is the outline of the exercise that I presented to the students. Once they selected their groups, identified their event and their narrator perspectives, they had to research to find the authentic answers to these questions about their fictional narrator’s experiences. The students were required to submit an annotated bibliography before submitting their responses to their questions so I could check the sources they were using for depth and accuracy. For citations I usually recommend they use a resource like BibMe, but they prefer EasyBib. When they were ready to began crafting their short story, I provided them this rubric (according to which their final story collections were assessed) and links to several online writing assistants and resources like writing advice from Barry Lane, literacy education online, and the Roane State OWL.
By writing historical fiction students develop research skills, critical reading and writing skills, become intimately familiar with a period of time in history and engage in authentic inquiry. 


About the Guest Blogger, Jacquelyn Whiting:
This is my fourth year as a member of the humanities department at Joel Barlow High School in rural Redding, CT. I have been teaching social studies since 1993 during which time I have taught all different levels of US History including AP, as well as American Government, Art History, Women in American History, Psychology, Environmental Studies and integrated US History and English. My work with my classes is archived on my website: http://jackiewhiting.net as is my contact information. I also write a blog about incorporating digital resources into the study of the humanities, http://www.thedigitalhumanities.com/. I am currently the chair of the professional development committee for my school and offer workshops each year focused on exploring and integrating into the curriculum web resources that enhance our teaching and our students learning. Outlines of and resources for these workshops are also available on my website.

The Arts and History - Part 1

The Topic: Is it Art?
Many lesson series or units can begin with this question and push students at any grade level and in many different disciplines to consider the purpose of art. In some manner we always consider this question at the beginning of the semester in my Art History class, but it also emerges in my US History class as well.

Depending on the grade level and experiences of the students they can consider a host of examples of what is considered art by some critics or audiences but not others, like Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain:

Or art that is valued monetarily and aesthetically today but was criticized and dismissed when it was created:
“The Parliament in London,” Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
The Yorck Project, public domain Wikimedia Commons

This question, what is art?, has even been explored in pop culture outside of the fine arts world. A Murphy Brown episode (“Is it Art?”) was once dedicated to exploring this question as was an episode of The Simpsons (“Mom and Pop Art”). I have used excerpts from both of these shows to stimulate conversation among my high school art history students.

The Method:
Duchamp and Monet have an established place in the art world and art history. To help students explore this question, what is art?, in a way that engages them in their place and time, a debate over the merits and value of street art or graffiti art works well. When asking students to consider these images we begin with this set of questions:

Why do artists make art?
Why do audiences consider it?
Is the role or purpose of the artist to inform? entertain? amuse? enlighten? satisfy?

Wrestling with these questions in the context of selected images helps students gain the vocabulary, insight and vision that allows them to consider What is Art? in an informed way.

Online Resources:

The Brooklyn Museum has an extensive, entirely interactive exhibition about Jean Michel Basquiat. He began as a street artist under the name SAMO and evolved into a member of Andy Warhol’s cohort at The Factory.

Unurth is a site dedicated to displaying street art from around the world. It is built in part by the site owner and in part through submission by site visitors. By clicking on a city, viewers can see a selection of street art from that location. There is a section dedicated to the work of Banksy.

KQED EdSpace in their “Do Now” section pose the question “Is Graffiti Art?” They acknowledge that it is a controversial form of self-expression that is viewed as destructive on one hand and valuable on the other. To inform this discussion KQED offers both a still image and a video based around San Francisco street art.



Curricular Applications:
The examination of graffiti can be an integral part of an art history unit. Or, considering such work - and the ways in which it is exalted and diminished - can be an interesting component in a study of free speech perhaps comparing sanctioned political murals with political graffiti. Or, students could evaluate a work of art or an artist for potential grant funding or write a legal brief for or against the protection of a street art 
display. Similarly, the issues raised by street art (censorship, isolation, youth and rebellion, social and political commentary) resonate through many selections of literature from the 20th Century. A consideration of street art could be a springboard into or companion to a literary exploration. 


About the Guest Blogger, Jacquelyn Whiting:
This is my fourth year as a member of the humanities department at Joel Barlow High School in rural Redding, CT. I have been teaching social studies since 1993 during which time I have taught all different levels of US History including AP, as well as American Government, Art History, Women in American History, Psychology, Environmental Studies and integrated US History and English. My work with my classes is archived on my website: http://jackiewhiting.net as is my contact information. I also write a blog about incorporating digital resources into the study of the humanities, http://www.thedigitalhumanities.com/. I am currently the chair of the professional development committee for my school and offer workshops each year focused on exploring and integrating into the curriculum web resources that enhance our teaching and our students learning. Outlines of and resources for these workshops are also available on my website.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Name that Famous Painting - Music Video

This morning on the Open Culture blog I came across a music video that might be of interest to art teachers. The band Hold Your Horses (yeah, I'd never heard of them either) produced a music video in which they recreated the scenes of 24 famous paintings. Open Culture listed the paintings and their painters. Flavor Wire has images of all of the original paintings along with still images from the video for comparison. The music video is embedded below.


70 Million by Hold Your Horses ! from L'Ogre on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
At the high school level or higher this video could be used for a fun art history quiz.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Snag Learning Film of the Week - Curious About Cuba

This week's Snag Learning Film of the Week is Curious About Cuba: The Great Museums of Havana. Curious About Cuba is an hour long exploration of Cuba's culture and history. The film examines the work of some people in Cuba to preserve artifacts that document Cuba's culture and history. As always Snag Learning has a series of discussion questions to accompany the film. The film is embedded below.
Watch more free documentaries

Monday, June 6, 2011

Explore and Learn at The Met

I recently spent some time exploring the website of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and found that there are some great resources for teachers and students on it. The first place that teachers will want to check out is the Publications for Educators page. In the Publications for Educators you will find a series of PDFs to accompany online features about the art of Egypt, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Beyond the online features in the educators' section, there are some great activities that students can learn from on their own. Students might enjoy and learn from How Van Gogh Made His Mark. How Van Gogh Made His Mark is part biography, part art lesson, and part hands-on drawing activity. After reading about Van Gogh and seeing his art students can try their hands at creating their own Van Gogh-like drawings.

Students will also like Marduk, King of the Gods which is a narrated thirty slide presentation about ancient Mesopotamia.