Showing posts with label Battle of Gettysburg. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Battle of Gettysburg. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Lee's Map of Gettysburg - And Tools for Making It Interactive

Today's featured document featured by the National Archives is a copy of General Robert E. Lee's map of the Battle of Gettysburg. If you download a copy of the map (which you can do as it is in the public domain) and then zoom-in on it, you will be able to see the notations about troop positions.

As someone who is generally fascinated by maps and history, I immediately started thinking about how this map could be used in a U.S. history lesson. My first thought was to have students enhance the map by making a copy and then uploading it to Thinglink. Once in Thinglink students can add interactive pins to it to explain the significance of places on the map. Those interactive pins could include text, images, and videos. Watch this video to learn how to use Thinglink with a map.

Another way to make this map interactive is to download a copy then upload it to Formative. In Formative you can then add pins to the map. Each of those pins can include questions for your students to answer. A demonstration of how to use Formative for that type of activity is available in this video.

Finally, as a Mainer, I can't think about the Battle of Gettysburg without thinking about this scene from the movie Gettysburg.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Interactive Map - The Battle of Gettysburg

Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg is an interactive map hosted on Smithsonian.com. The map details events of the battle and the decisions made by commanding officers on both sides of the war. You can navigate the map by using the timeline on the left-hand side of the map or by clicking the placemarks on the map. While viewing the map you will see "eye" icons that you can click to view a panorama of that location. The panoramic view is of Gettysburg as it exists today.

Applications for Education
Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg could be a good resource to use to support middle school or high school lessons on Gettysburg. The map also provides a good model of using ArcGIS Story Maps to convey geo-located information. Your students could take the model of Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg and apply it to the creation of their own maps about significant moments in history.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Interactive Map - Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg

Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg is an interactive map hosted on Smithsonian.com. The map details events of the battle and the decisions made by commanding officers on both sides of the war. You can navigate the map by using the timeline on the left-hand side of the map or by clicking the placemarks on the map. While viewing the map you will see "eye" icons that you can click to view a panorama of that location. The panoramic view is of Gettysburg as it exists today.

Applications for Education
Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg could be a good resource to use to support middle school or high school lessons on Gettysburg. The map also provides a good model of using ArcGIS Story Maps to convey geo-located information. Your students could take the model of Decisive Moments at the Battle of Gettysburg and apply it to the creation of their own maps about significant moments in history.

H/T to Google Maps Mania

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Lee's Map of Gettysburg

Today's featured document from the National Archives is General Robert E. Lee's map of Gettysburg. The map includes the placement of troops on July 2, 1863. Download the high resolution copy of the map to see the details of the map. Lee's Map of Gettysburg is one of many Civil War documents, images, and maps available from the National Archives.

Applications for Education
Lee's Map of Gettysburg could be used as an image overlay for a tour of Civil War sites that you have students create in Google Earth. The map could also be used as part of lesson plan like CSI Gettysburg developed by Jim Beeghley and published on his site Teaching the Civil War with Technology.