Showing posts with label Bus Huxley. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bus Huxley. Show all posts

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Making Maple Syrup - A Science and Math Lesson

The days are getting warmer here in Maine, the sun is shining a bit longer each day, and the snow is starting to melt. That means that two of a Mainer's favorite seasons are starting; mud season and maple syrup season. My friend Gardner Waldeier AKA Bus Huxley on YouTube collects maple sap to make maple syrup. He does it the old fashioned way and he made a video about the process.

Gardner's video shows viewers how he collects maple sap and turns it into maple syrup. In the video explains why maple sap is collected at this time of year, how much sap he'll collect from a large tree, and just how much sap it takes to make a gallon of maple syrup. You also get a nice tour of Gardner's woodlot and plenty of images of his helpful dog.


Applications for Education
I don't think that Gardner deliberately edited the video to have the ideal length and pacing for a flipped classroom lesson, but that's how it turned out. Try EDpuzzle or Vizia to make a flipped lesson with Making Maple Syrup by Bus Huxley.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Shuck 400 Oysters...Bus Huxley Shows You Can Learn Anything Online

Gardner Waldeier is one of the most interesting people that I know. We first met when he showed up to a cycling club group ride with a 20+ year old steel bike and a borrowed helmet while wearing cotton pants and sneakers. He then proceeded to crush almost everyone on the climbs and held his own on the sprints. I knew then that Gardner wasn't your average cat.

Gardner produces some fantastic videos that he publishes on YouTube under the screen name of Bus Huxley (that's also the name he uses on Strava). Lately he's been getting some press in New England for his videos including a recent profile that was aired on many National Public Radio stations. Listen to the interview and you'll hear some astute observations about learning and sharing in the digital age.

Gardner says, "I live my life by saying that I can do something that I can't." He then goes out and uses the Internet to learn how to do those things like shucking 400 oysters for a restaurant on short notice.

The end of the recent NPR story about Gardner closes with this valuable reminder for all of us; "once something is put out on the Internet, it is carved into digital stone."



Take a look at Gardner's videos and see what you can learn. And listen to the NPR profile, it has some gems for digital age from a man who seeming straddles the 21st, 20th, and 19th Centuries every day.