Showing posts with label College Admissions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label College Admissions. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Try Pathbrite for Creating Academic Portfolios

Pathbrite is a free service for creating digital academic portfolios. Pathbrite provides an easy-to-follow template for creating your portfolio. There are ten parts to the template, but you can skip parts that you don't think you need. Your Pathbrite portfolio can include transcripts, letters, and samples of your work. You can import information from a number of social networks as well as upload materials that are stored on your computer.

Applications for Education
About a month ago someone asked me if I had a standard digital portfolio template to use with students. At that time I didn't, but now with Pathbrite I do have one. Pathbrite could be a good tool for high school students to use to organize materials and create a portfolio that they can share with college admissions counsellors.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Interactive Map-Based College Search

Campus Bird is a website designed to help students locate a college or graduate school that is right for them. Campus Bird provides a great set of search filters for helping students narrow their list of choices. Students can filter their searches by degree type, major field of study, location, campus setting, athletics, and special program offerings. On their own, the extensive list of search filters would make Campus Bird a good college search service, but Campus Bird takes it a step further by incorporating Google Earth.

Campus Bird uses the Google Earth browser plug-in to show students the location of the colleges in which they're interested. For some colleges, Campus Bird offers the opportunity to take a virtual tour of the campus within the Google Earth browser plug-in. Students can also use the Yelp search box located at the bottom of the map to search for restaurants, businesses, and wireless hotspots around campus.

Applications for Education
I've explored dozens college search websites over the years and Campus Bird is one of the best. If your high school's guidance department has a website, Campus Bird should be one of the links on it.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Whatfolio - Publish Your Digital Portfolio

Whatfolio is a free service for creating online displays of your digital works.   Whatfolio is essentially a homepage to show off what you have created or what you can do. Whatfolio pages are highly customizable for a variety of purposes. When you create your Whatfolio pages you can choose from thirty templates. You'll find templates for photographers, designers, personal websites, business websites, student work samples, and many other showcase purposes.

I gave Whatfolio a test run this afternoon and I have to that it really does offer a lot of options, but it doesn't have the most intuitive interface I've ever used. Once you figure out all of the options you have, the service is quite nice. You can watch an overview of the Whatfolio creation process in the video below.


Whatfolio has a mobile version for editing. You can see an overview of the mobile version in the video below.


Applications for Education
Whatfolio could be a good service for students in graphic design programs like the one at my school to show off their work for college admissions offices.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Campus Bird - Search for Colleges and Take Virtual Tours

Campus Bird is a free site designed to help students locate a college that fits their needs and wants. The site offers all of the usual selection criterion like major, location, campus size that you find on most college search sites. The differentiating aspect of Campus Bird is that they have embedded a Google Maps view of all of the colleges in their index. Once you have selected your search criteria you can quickly view the location of each college and explore the surrounding area. In some cases you will be taken to a virtual tour of a college's campus. Campus Bird says that it is working on adding more virtual tours to their database.

Applications for Education
This is the time of year when high school students are getting serious about their searches for the "perfect" college for them. Campus Bird could be another search tool to pass along to students and perhaps link to your school's guidance department website.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

7 Sites to Help Students Choose and Apply to Colleges

This year my advisory group at school is comprised of Juniors (11th grade students) who will be exploring their post-secondary options and applying to colleges. As I mentioned last week, one of the things that they will be doing tomorrow is Googling themselves as part of a lesson on digital footprints. Throughout the year we will be exploring many topics related to the college application process. Over the last few years I've gathered some Internet resource that could be helpful for students and their parents as they work through the college application process. Here are seven resources to help students and their parents select, apply, and prepare for college.

My College Calendar helps students organize their college applications. Students select the names of the colleges to which they are applying then My College Calendar generates a calendar with important due dates for the application procedure at each college. Also on My College Calendar students will find advice regarding the logistics of going away to college and living on campus. My College Calendar provides advice about finding a part-time job, establishing a bank account, managing phone bills, planning travel, and other important non-academic tasks that are fundamental to going away to college.

One of the guidance counselors at my school recommended College Confidential to me because she is very impressed by it. College Confidential provides students with a wealth of information and tools for choosing a college, applying to college, and paying for college. After being accepted and figuring out how to pay for college, students can come back to College Confidential to learn about what to expect in their first year and how to thrive as a new college student. College Confidential has a section called "Ask The Dean" where students can find answers to frequently asked questions like "will my writing be a problem in college?" College Confidential doesn't leave parents out of the mix. Parents and students can join discussion boards on College Confidential to share experiences and advice with each other.
Unigo relies on huge database of student generated content for college reviews. Unigo has reviews written by students as well as video content. The value of Unigo extends beyond college reviews to first-hand accounts of mistakes made and lessons learned in the first year of college. Finally, as you might expect, Unigo has a social networking aspect through which current students and future students can connect. The video below, shot by Allen Stern of Center Networks, is an interview with Unigo's founder in which he explains how the service was started and what the service does. The value of the video extends beyond an explanation of Unigo. The founder, Jordan Goldman, explains why he feels that a liberal arts degree has helped him in business.

College Crunch claims to be "the best college resource online ever." I don't know if it's the best ever, but it is good. College Crunch features college reviews, college profiles, tips for navigating the logistics of college financing, and career planning advice. The career planning advice includes lists of salaries by career.

Educaedu is essentially a search engine for degree programs. To use Educaedu select the geographic area in which you would like to study. Then select the type of program you are searching for. Educaedu will then generate a list of schools offering your desired degree program. You can refine your search to find certificate programs, associate degrees, bachelor degrees, and masters degrees.

Campus Explorer gives prospective students the option to search for colleges by location and or degree/program type. What makes Campus Explorer a potentially valuable resource for those searching for a college is the advice section attached to each college review. The advice appears to be genuine advice from real students. In addition to the advice section, where available, videos are attached to each college's review.


The University Parent Connection is a website offering advice to parents of college students and college-bound students. University Parent provides advice about all of the typical concerns that parents have as their children prepare for college. In addition to advice about college planning, financing, and admissions University Parent provides online guides to specific colleges and universities. University Parent plans to have a parent community discussion forum in the near future. The discussion forum could be a good place for parents to share experiences and learn from each other.

Thursday, January 7, 2010

Calculate the Future Costs of College

The New York Times has a handy little tool for students and their parents to use as they prepare to finance a college education. The College Cost Calculator allows users to estimate the cost of college up to twenty years from now. To use the calculator enter the current tuition then select the number of years from now in which the student will start college. After inputting the current tuition and start date, the College Cost Calculator will generate a graph of the predicted costs for four years of schooling. The calculator uses a 3% rate of increase, but you can alter that rate with the slider at the bottom of your graph and the graph will automatically adjust.
















Applications for Education
If you work with students and parents on college planning the College Cost Calculator could be a useful for appropriate planning.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Unigo - College Reviews and Advice from Students
College Cruch - Resources for College and Career Planning
My College Calendar Helps Students Organize College Applications

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Campus Explorer - College Search and Advice

There is no shortage of college search and college planning websites on the Internet. One good college search website that I've recently learned about is Campus Explorer. Campus Explorer gives prospective students the option to search for colleges by location and or degree/program type. What makes Campus Explorer a potentially valuable resource for those searching for a college is the advice section attached to each college review. The advice appears to be genuine advice from real students. In addition to the advice section, where available, videos are attached to each college's review.

Applications for Education
Campus Explorer could be a good to resource lists for guidance counselors or anyone involved in helping students pick a college.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
College Crunch - Resources for College Planning
College Grazing - Helps Students Focus College Search
YouTube Edu - 100+ Colleges on YouTube

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Lincoln Turns 200 - And College Visit Tips

Today's episode of CNN Student News features a segment about Lincoln's 200th birthday and a segment about getting the most out of a college campus visit. The Lincoln segment appears first and the college campus visitation segment appears around the 7:30 mark.



Applications for Education
As always, CNN provides a quick ten question quiz about the video. The quiz provides a quick means of checking for understanding.
The segment on visiting college campuses is good viewing material for high school juniors and seniors.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Get a Haircut and Get a Real Job

Today's episode of CNN Student News (embedded below) features a segment about high school and college students that are getting haircuts in the hopes of improving their chances of landing a job. This episode reminded me of a couple of other resources for students to consider before applying for a job or applying to college.

Sacha Chua writes a great blog that often contains tips for Generation Y job seekers. Sacha has produced a great slideshow about how social media can influence your work and workplace. Sacha also posted today, a list of great tips for networking at conferences. The tips she listed could easily be applied to a job fair setting.

Lindsey Pollak is the author of Getting from College to Career. Pollack writes a blog that offers job search and interview tips for college students. She also writes for ABC News on Campus where your students can find articles like 10 Easy Ways to Fid a Job During Winter Break.



Aplications for Education
In today's tough job market any little detail could be the difference between getting a job and not getting a job. If you're a high school teacher or guidance counselor advising students in job or college interview preparation, the resources mentioned above are worth sharing with your stuents.

Monday, November 24, 2008

University Parent Connection - College Planning Advice for Parents

The University Parent Connection is a relatively new website offering advice to parents of college students and college-bound students. University Parent provides advice about all of the typical concerns that parents have as their children prepare for college. In addition to advice about college planning, financing, and admissions University Parent provides online guides to specific colleges and universities. University Parent plans to have a parent community discussion forum in the near future. The discussion forum could be a good place for parents to share experiences and learn from each other.

After checking out the University Parent Connection, you may also want to give these college planning resources a look:
Ask About College
Green Note - Micro Student Loans
Freshman Fund
My College Calendar

My College Calendar Helps Students Organize Applications

My College Calendar is a website that I discovered when they started following me on Twitter. My College Calendar helps students organize their college applications. Students select the names of the colleges to which they are applying then My College Calendar generates a color-coded calendar with important due dates for the application procedure at each college. See the screen images below for an example of this.



















Also on My College Calendar students will find advice regarding the logistics of going away to college and living on campus. My College Calendar provides advice about finding a part-time job, establishing a bank account, managing phone bills, planning travel, and other important non-academic tasks that are fundamental to going away to college.

Monday, November 10, 2008

Funding Mount Education

This video from the CBS Fast Draw team illustrates and explains the costs of higher education in the United States. The video shares some ideas about finding the funds necessary for paying tuition and other college expenses.



Applications for Education
This video could be of interest to anyone that is involved in helping students and parents plan for college. My school hosts a "FAFSA Help Night" every year. This short video might be used as a short introduction to encourage parents and students to apply for every aid program for which they might be eligible.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Ask About College Provides Advice for Applicants

Ask About College is a service designed to answer the questions that students might have when applying to a particular college or university. Ask About College provides not only "canned" responses to general questions, it also provides unique responses to a student's unique question. Ask About College offers answers from students for students. For example if a high school student is considering attending The Ohio State University that student can find basic information about the university, but if he or she can't find an answer to a unique question they can Ask About College and get a response.

Ask About College could become a popular resource for high school students because it does offer integration with Facebook. Between the Ask About College service and the use of Facebook, students should be able to find the answer to just about any question about a particular college or university.

Here are a couple of other college advice services that I've reviewed in the past.
The U
My College Quick Start
Monkey See

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Win $10,000 Toward College Tuition

Mental Floss, Borders, and Merriam-Webster are sponsoring an essay contest for students planning to pursue a two year or four year undergraduate program in 2009. The contest will award $10,000 to the authors of five winning essays. In 750 words or less, students should convince the judges that they are the most deserving candidate for the $10,000 prize. You can read all of the contest details on Mental Floss.

Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Web 2.0 in the Workplace

If you have ever struggled to explain to students, parents, colleagues, or bosses how web 2.0 can become an important part of professional development, take a look at this short slide show from Sacha Chua. Sacha Chua blogs about all types of web 2.0 related topics including how new technology influences and fits into the workplace. (Thanks to Skip Z for the tip via Twitter).



Applications for Education
The lesson that high school students should take away from this slide show is that everyone is watching what you do in web 2.0. As students prepare for job interviews or college admissions interviews, reminding them to consider carefully what they've posted on Facebook, Myspace, or elsewhere and decide if they should leave that information for all of the world to see.

Monday, June 2, 2008

Peer to Peer Lending For Micro Student Loans

Green Note is a company specializing in peer to peer lending for student aid. (Peer to peer lending is also known as social lending). Green Note, like the Fynanz service reviewed earlier this year, is designed to help students bridge the gap between financial need and the financial aid packages they receive from their college or university. Green Note facilitates loans between members of social networks. Loans can come from friends and relatives or from private investors looking to make low-risk loans. In their words, "get student loans from people who believe in you." Loan amounts are flexible and can be larger than $10,000 or as small as $100. For students the benefits are a low fixed interest rate and no co-signer requirement. For lenders the benefit is a low-risk investment opportunity.

Monday, April 14, 2008

Free Technology For Teachers: CaptainU

CaptainU is a new website for high school soccer players hoping to play in college. CaptainU provides a forum for students to market themselves to college coaches and connect with other students hoping to play collegiate soccer, but aren't quite good enough to be recruited by top-tier programs. CaptainU provides students with a host of information about various colleges and their athletic departments.

Application for Education
CaptainU is a resource for guidance counselors, coaches, and athletic directors trying to help student athletes select a college. The information about academics and financial aid present student athletes with a realistic picture of their options. CaptainU is a free service unlike the numerous companies out there that essentially act as marketing agents for high school athletes.



Here is a video introduction to CaptainU's services.

A stroll through CaptainU - Player Edition from CaptainU on Vimeo.

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Free Technology For Teachers: Communiversity - Students Share and Learn About Colleges

Communiversity is a website on which students and their parents can find information about the colleges they're considering attending. Communiversity is similar to theU which I reviewed in January (click here to read about theU). Communiversity is a user content generated site on which current students can share information about their college. Communiversity is an avenue through which prospective students can get "inside" information about a college.

Wednesday, February 6, 2008

Free Technology For Teachers: MIT for Free- Courses and Resources for High School Students

For quite a while MIT has made available for free the course materials including lecture notes for over 1800 of their courses through their Open Course Ware website. Click here to see the course New Media Literacies available right now. Some of the books cited for the courses are available as free downloads while other books have to be purchased for Amazon.com.

Recently MIT began offering a similar Open Course Ware site designed for high school students and teachers. The website is called Highlights for High School. The Highlights program is designed for college bound students to get exposure to introductory level (100 level) college courses. Click the image below to watch an introductory video from MIT about the Highlights program.

Applications for Educators
The MIT Highlights website is a great resource for high school teachers. The video section of the MIT Highlights website not only provides a brief summary of the topic to be discussed, provides a list of the prior knowledge a student needs in order to comprehend the subject of the video. The website provides a list of lab activities and competitions appropriate for college bound high school students. Finally, MIT provides a list of Advanced Placement course resources that teachers should find useful.

Friday, February 1, 2008

My College Quickstart- now available without an access code.

I just received an email from the College Board announcing that their online planning guide for students and parents is now available to all students regardless of whether or not they have taken the PSAT or SAT. This is new because the College Board for years has had online planning guides but they were only available to student who had taken a College Board test.


Application for Education
In addition to free planning guides for students and parents the College Board has added a new section of free resources for teachers and guidance counselors.