Showing posts with label Demographics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Demographics. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Zip Lookup - Demographics by Zip Code

Zip Lookup is a nice use of the Esri mapping platform. The map allows you to enter any US zip code to discover demographic data about that area. Whenever I see something like this I am skeptical of how well it will work for very small towns like the one that I live in (Woodstock, Maine). I was pleasantly surprised to find that Zip Lookup was quite accurate. In fact, it even included a blurb about the most popular satellite television stations in my zip code (my zip code is actually shared with a town, a village, and an unorganized township).

Applications for Education
Zip Lookup could be a neat tool for students to use to discover how people in other parts of their counties, states, or country live. A short research activity based on Zip Lookup would be to investigate what draws people of a particular demographic to an area.

Sunday, July 6, 2014

An Interactive Look at the History and Distribution of Baby Names in the U.S.

How Baby Names Spread Across the U.S. is an interactive map that showcases the history and distribution of baby names. The map draws on data from the U.S. Census Bureau to show the popularity of baby names since 1911 through 2012. Enter a baby name into the search box and click "go" to see the distribution of that name. You can place your cursor over a state to watch the data for just that state change. I did this with the name Michael and the state of Wyoming to learn that from 1926 to 1930 none of the babies born in Wyoming were named Michael.

The map was developed by Brian Rowe and published on The Guardian's Data Store.

Applications for Education
How Baby Names Spread Across the U.S. could be the start of an interesting research exercise for social studies students. You could have students pick a name, perhaps their own names, and try to determine why that name is more popular in one state or region compared with another.

Saturday, April 2, 2011

American History Demographic Chart Book

The American History Demographic Chart Book is a website featuring dozens of graphics about US demographics from 1790 through 2010. The site is divided into seventeen chapters each containing multiple dynamic graphics. The chapters are labeled according to demographic categories such as age, marital status, education, and birthplace.

H/T to US History Teachers Blog.

Applications for Education
Examining how demographic data has changed over the course of US History can be a good way for students to  explore the causes of events and eras in US History. The American History Demographic Chart Book puts all of that data in one place for students to explore.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

The Face of Seven Billion People

The newest issue of National Geographic appeared in my mailbox this afternoon. I opened it up to find a neat poster titled The Face of Seven Billion inside the new issue. Online, National Geographic has the same poster in an interactive display. The Face of Seven Billion uses tiny drawings of people (each represents 1 million people) to create the face of one person. Click the tabs to the side of the image to read some data about the characteristics of the world's population.

While the interactive image is neat and does offer some good data, I think National Geographic's 7 Billion: World Party and video 7 Billion People are more informative resources.

Monday, December 27, 2010

Mapping America - Census Data by Zip Code

The New York Times has taken US Census data and created some good mapped displays of that data. Mapping America offers four categories of maps that you can explore; education, housing and families, income, and race and ethnicity. In each category you can choose from a variety of sub-categories of display. Select a category and subcategory then enter your zip code to see a mapped display of the data from your community. The image below is of the map of the population in Portland, Maine holding a Master's degree.

Applications for Education
Mapping America could be a good way for students to learn more about their own communities, neighboring communities, or any place of interest to them in the US. Students can explore the data in the maps and research what it means for the community. For example, my Civics students recently completed a project in which they had to research some demographic data about their community and include that data in their development of proposals for stimulating the local economy.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Economics Lessons Using Planet Money Podcasts
Infographic - The Most Expensive Places to Live
Video - Project Based Learning Explained

Friday, October 1, 2010

Show World - Infographic Maps

Show World is an interactive mapping website that takes demographic, economic, environmental, and political data sets and creates maps based on those data. This can be done with Google Earth and Google Maps before, but Show World is slightly different. Each time you select a different data set, the size of each country increases or decreases in comparison to other countries. For example, if you select the data set about steel production, the size of China is huge relative to African countries. On the other hand, if you select the data set for students not in school, the African countries swell while China decreases in size.

The maps generated by Show World can be downloaded. You can also embed the animated maps into your blog. To get the embed code you do have to submit your email address.


Applications for Education
Show World is a great way for students to visually interpret data sets. Having students explore the data sets and watch the size of the countries change could be a good discussion starting activity. Exploring the data sets on Show World could also be the starting point for research about the economic and social conditions of countries around the world.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

World Mapper - Mapped Displays of World Data

World Mapper hosts nearly 700 informative maps and posters. The maps are based on economic, scientific, and demographic data sets. The maps are drawn according to the data so the countries appearing on the map don't always match the geographic size of a country. For example, the World Youth Literacy map depicts each country's size based on the rate of youth literacy rather than just the population of a country. All of the maps created by World Mapper can be downloaded as a PDF. The PDFs include a brief description of the data and its meaning as displayed in the map.

In addition to PDF maps, World Mapper has a selection of animated maps that compares two maps. Click here to see an animated map that transitions from a standard land area display to a map drawn based on the population of each country.

Applications for Education
Looking at data on its own often doesn't mean much to students. World Mapper's maps should help students interpret data sets and make comparisons between data sets.

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

World Clock - World Statistics in Real-time

World Clock is a neat little website that provides continuous updates of demographic statistics from around the world. The clock continuously updates data on topics including, but not limited to, population growth, oil produced, cars produced, and deaths caused by various illnesses. The data used in the World Clock comes from the World Health Organization, CIA Factbook, and the US Census Bureau.

Applications for Education
World Clock could be useful for showing students how quickly the world's population is changing, the seriousness of some illnesses, or the rate of oil production in the world.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Show World - Change the World One Map at a Time
Free Posters, Free Maps

Monday, September 7, 2009

This We Know - Government Data About Your Town

This We Know is a search engine for US Government data about your community. To find data about your community simply enter your community's name or enter your community's zip code. This We Know draws its data from Data.gov. Some of the data that you will find include the number of factories in a community, rate of violent crime, and demographics.

Applications for Education
This We Know could be the starting place for a student research project comparing communities. Students can compare communities and then present a case, based on the data, for which community they would most like to live in.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
How Americans Spend Their Time
Data.gov Makes Raw Government Data Accessible

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Show World - Change the World One Map At a Time

Show World is an interactive mapping website that takes demographic and economic data sets and creates a map based on the data. I've seen this done with Google Earth and Google Maps before, but Show World is slightly different. Each time you select a different data set, the size of each country increases or decreases in comparison to other countries. For example, if you select the data set about steel production, the size of China is huge relative to African countries. On the other hand, if you select the data set for students not in school, the African countries swell while China decreases in size.

World Mapper is a similar website that I reviewed about six weeks ago.

Applications for Education
Show World is a great way for students to visually interpret data sets. Having students explore the data sets and watch the size of the countries change could be a good discussion starting activity. Exploring the data sets on Show World could also be the starting point for research about the economic and social conditions of countries around the world.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Find and Create Policy Maps

Policy Map from TRF (the Reinvestment Fund) provides an easy to use tool for building maps to illustrate demographic, economic, education, crime, and energy data. Policy Map also furnishes hundreds of datasets that are graphically illustrated on a series of maps.

The free map building portion of Policy Map allows users to customize a map based on existing datasets. The maps are based on the Pushpin mapping program which is quite similar to adding placemarks on Google Maps. In fact, I can't see any reason why the data on Policy Map couldn't be used on Google Maps.

The real utility of Policy Map lies in the data sets and preexisting maps. The maps and datasets provided by Policy Map cover almost every possible demographic statistic a student could need. Policy Map even has a series of maps generated around school related statistics.

Applications for Education
Policy Map has over 4,000 datasets related to
demographic, economic, education, crime, and energy. This collection of data and the corresponding maps are great resources for teachers and students to develop data analysis and inference skills. Students can use the data available from Policy Map build their own maps specifically related to their locality.

Below is an example of map built on Policy Map.