Showing posts with label Dialect. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dialect. Show all posts

Saturday, June 29, 2013

Instagram, Food, and Regional Differences

I'm not likely to be accused of being a hipster anytime soon, but this evening I did Instagram a picture of part of my dinner. Brown bread from a can is a central part of a "traditional Maine suppah" of baked beans, red hot dogs, and brown bread. Some folks wash it down with Moxie too (I forgot the Moxie today). My Instagrammed picture sparked a bunch of questions on Twitter. This got me thinking about how much fun it could be to learn about various parts of the world through pictures of food.

Applications for Education
You wouldn't have to use Instagram or Twitter to spark your students' questions about foods from different parts of the world, but it might be a more authentic method than simply Googling "foods from place X." Reach out to your personal learning network on Twitter, Google+, or Facebook and ask people to share a picture of a "traditional meal" or "traditional ingredient" from their region. You might be surprised what your students ask and what they find out about other parts of their countries and the world. This activity could pair nicely with these maps of 128 dialect differences in the United States.

Monday, June 17, 2013

128 Maps of Regional Dialect Differences

Joshua Katz at North Carolina State University has produced 128 heat maps (the maps take a while to load) highlighting the differences in regional dialects in the continental United States. The maps are based on the responses to 128 questions. The questions ask things like, "do you pronounce cot and caught the same way?" The regional difference that I experience a lot is the different names for soda pop. Katz has a produced a map for that too.

Applications for Education
Browsing through the dialect survey maps could be a good way for students to learn a little about regional differences in the United States. You might ask your students to think about how and why these differences in dialects developed. Then ask your students if television and radio media has any influence on how people speak.

H/T to Open Culture.