Showing posts with label Earthquakes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Earthquakes. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Earthquakes 101 for Kids

National Geographic Education's Forces of Nature has been featured here in the past. This afternoon I revisited that resource and discovered a couple of other nice resources for teaching elementary and middle school students about earthquakes.

Earthquakes 101 is a short video introduction to the causes of earthquakes. The video is accompanied by a vocabulary list, a few "fast facts," and some discussion questions. After showing the video use the National Geographic Map Maker to illustrate the relationship of tectonic plates, fault lines, and seismic activity. To create this illustration select "themes," then "physical systems - land," then select the earthquakes and plate tectonics layers. This combination will show the seismic activity layer on top of the colored plate tectonics layer.

Applications for Education
National Geographic's Map Maker can be used without creating an account. The example I gave above of using it for creating an illustration of the relationship between earthquakes and tectonic plates is one of many illustrations you and your students can create. National Geographic's Map Maker offers six themes on which users can create custom map displays. Within each theme there are subcategories to choose from. For example, you can select the theme Physical Systems Land then choose volcanic eruptions to display on your map. Map Maker also provides drawing tool and marker icons that you can place on your map

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

What is a Tsunami? A Video Explanation

Explania is a good place to find video explanations and interactive images that explain all kinds of things from the worlds of science, technology, sports, and health. Today, on Explania I discovered this excellent animated explanation of tsunamis. The two and a half minute video explains how tsunamis are created and the impact of tsunamis when they reach land. The video is embedded below.


Tsunami Infographic from Shal on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
Unfortunately, the world saw plenty of footage last year of the tsunami in Japan. That provided plenty of visuals on the damage caused by tsunamis. This video provides a good way for students to see how a tsunami is formed. Here are a few other resources that you could also use in lessons about tsunamis: Tsunami Mapper, Tsunamis 101, Stop Disasters.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

11 Resources for Teaching and Learning About the Forces of Nature

After last weekend's visit from Hurricane Irene I have forces of nature on my brain. I guess there is something about seeing a giant tree across your neighbor's yard will do that to you. Therefore, today I assembled a list of some of my favorite resources for teaching and learning about forces of nature.

This one is a couple of years old but it is still good. USA Today has a slide presentation explaining how tornadoes are formed and what to do if you find yourself in the path of a tornado. The slide show is controlled by the viewer who moves a slider at the bottom of the screen to explore the formation of a tornado.


Forces of Nature is a film produced by National Geographic designed to educate students about volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornadoes. The Forces of Nature website provides a nice list of complete lesson plans for teachers of students in grades K through 12. Even if you can't get a copy of the movie, most of the lesson plans and activities are still very usable. Teachers of grades K through 6 may also want to check out the National Geographic Kids page titled Ten Freaky Forces of Nature.

If you can't acquire the Forces of Nature film (available on Amazon $17.99), you may want to consider a similar film from National Geographic titled Violent Earth. Violent Earth can be viewed for free on Snag Films. Using Snag Films you can also embed the Violent Earth video into your blog, wiki, or website.

The USGS in partnership with the University of Utah produces the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory records and publishes data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. Much of the material on the site is very scientific in nature, but the Observatory website does offer some educational materials accessible to the non-scientist. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory offers three videos about the volcanoes of Yellowstone. The Observatory also offers photographic tours of Yellowstone.


Shape It Up is one of many good educational games and activities on Kinetic City. Shape It Up is an activity that would be good for use in an elementary school Earth Science lesson. The activity presents students with "before" and "after" images of a piece of Earth. Students then have to select the force nature and the span of time it took to create the "after" picture. If students choose incorrectly, Shape It Up will tell the student and they can choose again.

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean.

The USGS produces a good assortment of resources for teaching and learning about earthquakes. The USGS has resources for teachers and for students on every grade level from elementary school through college. Not included in the teachers resource section, but including in the general education page, are these flash animations of earthquakes and seismic activities. For Google Earth users the USGS produces Google Earth files for viewing earthquakes. One set of Google Earth files that the USGS produces allows you to view seismic activity in near-real time (the file refreshes every five minutes).

Violent Earth, produced by National Geographic, is a film about the causes of earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes. It's an excellent documentary if you have the time to watch it. But if you're searching for a shorter video explanation of the causes of tsunamis, National Geographic has something to fit that bill too. Tsunamis 101 is a three and one-half minute video about how a tsunami is caused and why they can be so deadly. The video is embedded below.



Volcano Above the Clouds is a NOVA program that chronicles an ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro by a group of climbers and scientists. In addition to the video, Volcano Above the Clouds offers a large collection of materials and teaching guides for learning about volcanoes, glaciers, and climate change with Mount Kilimanjaro at the center of each lesson. As Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the Seven Summits of the world, NOVA provides a slideshow of the Seven Summits which puts Kilimanjaro into perspective relative to those other summits.

The BBC has a series of interactive guides that explain how natural disasters are caused. Included in this series is a twelve part animated explanation of volcanic eruptions. The series also includes explanations of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis.

















For learning about earthquakes, the BBC has an animated guide to earthquakes. National Geographic offers an in-depth lesson plan for teaching elementary school students about earthquakes and volcanoes. National Geographic also has some excellent educational films about earthquakes, but if you do not have the budget to purchase them you may want to try Snag Films where you can watch full length documentaries like Violent Earth for free.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

National Geographic Video - Tsunamis 101

Violent Earth, produced by National Geographic, is a film about the causes of earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes. It's an excellent documentary if you have the time to watch it. But if you're searching for a shorter video explanation of the causes of tsunamis, National Geographic has something to fit that bill too. Tsunamis 101 is a three and one-half minute video about how a tsunami is caused and why they can be so deadly. The video is embedded below.



Violent Earth is available to view for free in its entirety on Snag Films. The first three minutes of it is included in the video below.
Watch more free documentaries

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Time Lapse Visualization of the Earthquake in Japan

There are a lot of good maps, images, and videos on the web for learning about the earthquake that hit Japan last week. Last night I found another good map for learning about the earthquake. The Japan Quake Map is a time lapse visualization of the last week's earthquake and aftershocks. The map plots all of the seismic activities in and around Japan for the last week. Each seismic activity is plotted on the map with a circle representing the magnitude of each quake. You can press play on the map to see the dots appear in the sequence of the quakes. You can choose to watch all of the days or select just one day from the drop down menu.

H/T to Google Maps Mania.

Sunday, March 13, 2011

Interactive Maps & Images About Earthquake in Japan

The New York Times has many features about the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Here are three that stand out.

The Crippled Japanese Nuclear Reactors is a set of drawings and animations that depicts how nuclear power plants are constructed and what could cause a meltdown at those facilities.

Map of the Damage From the Japanese Earthquake is an interactive map of sixteen locations in Japan affected by the earthquake. Zoom and click on the icons to see images and read information about each location.

How Shifting Plates Caused the Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan is a series of drawings and animations that explain what causes earthquakes and tsunamis.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Haiti Aid Map - Updates on Relief Projects

InterAction has created an interactive map that plots and tracks the spending and other actions of organizations providing aid to Haiti. The intent of InterAction in developing the Haiti Aid Map is to highlight the areas most affected by the January earthquake and where aid is most needed now.
(click image to view full size)








Applications for Education
The challenge of teaching current events is that a story that was huge six months ago is easily forgotten and replaced with another big news story. That doesn't mean that teachers and students should forget about the previous big story. The Haiti Aid Map could be a good resource for revisiting the story(ies) of the earthquake in Haiti.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Google Earth Layer About the Earthquake in Haiti
Photosynth - Devastation in Haiti
Scenes from a Ruined Boulevard - Interactive Photo Essay

Monday, March 1, 2010

CNN Student News - Earthquake in Chile

CNN Student News leads-off today's episode with a segment about the earthquake that shook Chile on Saturday morning. If you're in need of a resource to give your students a quick overview of the story, CNN Student News might meet that need. CNN Student News also has a downloadable map and a discussion guide to accompany your use of the video.


You may also be interested in checking out the Recording-Setting Earthquakes Interactive Map.

Larry Ferlazzo has also compiled a good list of resources for learning about the earthquake in Chile.

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Record-Setting Earthquakes: Interactive Map

By now you've probably heard that a massive magnitude 8.8 earthquake shook Chile this morning. CNN News has many stories and videos posted about it. One of the resources that they've also posted this morning is an interactive map depicting the world's biggest earthquakes and the world's deadliest earthquakes since 1900. Click on the map's placemarks to read the date and damage caused by each of the earthquakes.














Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes
Predicting Earthquakes
Forces of Nature - Earth Science Resources

Friday, February 19, 2010

Excellent Infographics About the Earthquake in Haiti

GOOD recently announced the winner of their Haiti Earthquake Infographic Contest. The winning infographic was Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake. Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake, created by Emily Schwartzman, clearly depicts the impact of the earthquake in terms of impact on the population and the areas of Haiti that were hit the hardest. After looking at all of the entries, I don't know how GOOD's editors were able to pick just one winner. All of the entries did a great job of illustrating the impact of the earthquake, the recovery needs, and the recovery efforts made. I particularly liked Claire Kohler's Earthquakes: Depth and Destruction which made an illustrated comparison of the size and impact of various earthquakes around the world in the last eleven years.

















Applications for Education
The Haiti Earthquake Infographics submitted for the GOOD contest provide an easy way for students to see the impact of the earthquake on Haiti. The posters also enable students to compare the charitable giving of organizations and countries.

The GOOD contest posters also provide a model for students to create their own infographics about Haiti and or other significant world events.

Monday, January 25, 2010

Recent Earthquake Teachable Moments

IRIS, Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, has compiled some good resources for teaching about the science of the earthquake in Haiti and earthquakes in general. Included in their list are videos, slideshows, and links to lesson plans. The videos are animated and narrated explanations of the science of earthquakes. All of the videos can be viewed on YouTube or downloaded as a Quicktime file. You can see a sample of these videos below.



Applications for Education
The visualizations found in this list are accessible for most middle school and high school students. For those of you that work with ESL/ ELL students, IRIS provides a list of resource that are accessible for Spanish speaking students.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes
Earthquake in Haiti - CNN Student News and Other Resources
Photosynth - Devastation in Haiti

Monday, January 18, 2010

Photosynth - Devastation in Haiti

Microsoft has created a Photosynth of images depicting the devastation caused by the earthquake in Haiti. The Photosynth allows you to zoom-in and rotate images for optimal viewing. Microsoft has also placed this Photosynth on a Bing map which provides geographic context of the images.
Explore the Photosynth below or on the Photosynth website.


Applications for Education
Last week I posted a link to a Google Earth layer that depicts before and after images of Haiti. This Photosynth from Microsoft provides much clearer imagery and is far easier to navigate than the Google Earth layer.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Google Earth Layer About the Earthquake in Haiti

As announced last night on the Google Lat Long Blog, there is now a Google Earth imagery layer showing the effects of the earthquake on Haiti. The layer is fairly basic at this point, highlighting a few key areas, but it is still useful for showing before and after images of Haiti. You can download the KML file here.

















A related item that may be of interest to you is:

Viewing Earthquakes in Google Earth

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Earthquake in Haiti - CNN Student News and Other Resources

Today's episode of CNN Student News has a very short segment about yesterday's earthquake in Haiti. CNN Student News has a PDF map that you can print and use in your classroom. You can find the map here.


I was without cable or Internet last night so I missed all of the breaking news about the earthquake in Haiti, but our friend Larry Ferlazzo was right on top of things and has put together a great list of resources for learning about the earthquake in Haiti.

CNN and the BBC have slideshows about the earthquake. View them here and here.

You may also want to see my list of five resources for learning about earthquakes. In addition to that list you may be interested in Stop Disasters, a game for learning about natural disasters.

Update: I forgot to mention this earlier, if you're looking for the latest news out of Haiti and or pictures, running a Twitter search for #Haiti or just Haiti will yield a constant stream of updates.

Sunday, April 19, 2009

Stop Disasters - Disaster Simulation Game

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean.

For teachers Stop Disasters provides fact sheets to distribute to students about each type of natural disaster. Stop Disasters also provides teachers with teaching guides, lesson plan ideas, and links to additional reference materials.

Applications for Education
Stop Disasters could be a great game for geography teachers and Earth science teachers to use in their classrooms. In order to be successful in this game students have to have knowledge of geography concepts and Earth science concepts.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
My Mini City
Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes

Forces of Nature - Earth Science Resources
Hurricane Tracking Resources

FREE National Geographic map with purchases $65+!

Friday, April 10, 2009

Predicting Earthquakes

Today's edition of CNN Student News includes a short segment examining the work being done by scientists to develop earthquake prediction systems. This video segment could be used in conjunction with one of the earthquake education resources that I posted earlier this week.
The video is embedded below.

Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes

The earthquake that shook central Italy is the leading segment of today's CNN Student News. The segment and offers only a brief overview of the earthquake. A better resource for learning about the earthquake is the BBC's interactive map of the region. On the map you will find videos and images of the damage caused by the earthquake.

For learning about earthquakes in general, the BBC has an animated guide to earthquakes. National Geographic offers an in-depth lesson plan for teaching elementary school students about earthquakes and volcanoes. National Geographic also has some excellent educational films about earthquakes, but if you do not have the budget to purchase them you may want to try Snag Films where you can watch full length documentaries like Violent Earth for free.

A previous resource that I have shared is Viewing Earthquakes in Google Earth. These Google Earth files allow you to see current and historical data about earthquakes. There is also a virtual tour of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake available in Google Earth.

Larry Ferlazzo has assembled a good list of resources for learning about the earthquake in Italy that you should also check out.

FREE National Geographic map with purchases $65+!