Showing posts with label Electronics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Electronics. Show all posts

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Tinkering With Arduino in Tinkercad

Tinkercad is a free service that I used for the last two years to introduce my students to designing and building Arduino-powered circuits, cars, and simple machines. As I wrote back in January, Tinkercad was great for introdcuing Arduino in a pandemic. Besides the Arduino aspect, Tinkercad is also a great place to find inspiration for makerspace activities. 

Later today Tinkercad is hosting a free webinar for educators who want to learn how to get use all of what Tinkercad offers. The webinar is at 7pm ET/ 4pm PT. 

If the timing of Tinkercad's webinar doesn't work for you, don't worry. Tinkercad's YouTube channel is full of recordings of previous webinars. It also contains a great playlist of tutorials for learning about Arduino in Tinkercad



Applications for Education
My favorite benefit of using Tinkercad to introduce Arduino is that students don't risk breaking any physical products while learning important lessons about circuits. Students can use Tinkercad to learn about Ohms Law and the use of resistors without the risk of actually burning out an LED or other element of an Arduino circuit. Once they've used Tinkercad to master the basics of Arduino then they can safely move on to using physical Arduino products.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

Making Simple Wearable Electronics - Webinar Recording

Last night Denise Wright gave a great presentation as part of the Practical Ed Tech Creativity Conference. Her presentation was Making Simple Wearable Electronics. In the presentation she shared a bunch of the wearable electronics projects that her middle school students have done. Some of the projects that she shared were making pedometers and smartwatches, a jean jacket that can play music, and electronic greeting cards. The recording of Denise's presentation is now available to view here.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Sand in Your Electronics? A Short Science Lesson

From our mobile phones to our televisions, silicon chips are a part of much of our daily lives. Where does silicon come from? Much of it comes from sand. The following video from the Chemical Heritage Foundation explains the concept of how silicon chips are created.


Applications for Education
This video could be good for showing students an example of the role of science in their daily lives. If you decide to use this video in a flipped classroom setting, try one of these tools for including an assessment in your flipped lesson.

Thursday, January 30, 2014

How Electronics Work

A few years ago Gizmodo ran a series of mostly video posts about the inner workings of electronics. The series of four posts featured videos explaining things like resistive sensors, LEDs, diodes, volts, amps, and electrical pressure. You can find the posts in sequence here, here, here, and here. The first video in the series is embedded below.  

Electrical Pressure from Sparkle Labs on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
If you teach any courses dealing with electronics, these videos could make a good supplement to your lessons. Some of the topics covered in the Gizmodo series deal with logic and sequencing (in fact the whole series kind of deals with sequencing) which could be worked into a mathematics lesson. Or perhaps you have a young person in your life who just likes to tinker with electronics (I loved to tinker with an electronics board from Radio Shack as kid in the 80's) and these videos could help that young person get a better understanding of electronics.