Showing posts with label GeoCommons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label GeoCommons. Show all posts

Saturday, May 17, 2014

GeoCommons - Browse Mapped Data and Create Data Maps

Maps can be a great tool for visualizing sets of data. GeoCommons offers a couple of good tools for finding mapped data sets and creating maps from data sets. GeoCommons Finder is a great place to find publicly shared data sets for use in maps. GeoCommons Maker. GeoCommons Maker provides users a quick and easy way to take the datasets found in GeoCommons Finder and display those datasets on a map. Users can create multi-layered maps and customize the way those layers are displayed. Click here to see a two layer map displaying demographic data regarding single parent households in theUnited States.

Maps created through GeoCommons can be saved as KML files, saved as images, or embedded into a website.

Applications for EducationGeoCommons Maker is as easy, if not easier, to use as Google Maps. The benefit of using GeoCommons Maker is that students can find datasets without having to search the Internet for them. This should save time when you're trying to complete a lesson plan in one sitting. GeoCommons has datasets that are relevant for use in Social Studies, Math, and Science.

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Nature Conservancy Conservation Maps

The Nature Conservancy has a great gallery of interactive maps portraying a large variety of conservation data. Some of the maps are tied to small regions and very specific projects while other maps are more global in scope. The Global Conservation Maps cover the largest variety of datasets and regions.

The Global Conservation Maps can be used to view data representations for marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems. To view the datasets on a map, select a base layer then choose a dataset from the drop down menu for that base map. For example, the screen image below is of a map representing the number of freshwater fish species in Africa.

Applications for Education
The Global Conservation Maps could be useful for students to use to examine conservation data by ecosystem and region. All of the data associated with the Global Conservation Maps can be downloaded for re-use in Google Maps, Google Earth, and GeoCommons. By downloading the data sets your students can create their own maps to show correlations and comparisons.

H/T to Google Maps Mania

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Create Mapped Data Visualizations on GeoCommons

GeoCommons provides excellent tools for creating and sharing map-based data visualizations. Users can select a from twelve base maps to build upon. After choosing a base map users can select from more than 49,000 public data sets or upload their own data sets. Map creators can add more than one data set to their maps. To complete the visualizations users can specify colors, shades, shapes, and apply numerous filters to determine what is or is not displayed from their chosen data sets. Completed maps can be shared as KML files or embedded into blogs and websites. The two videos below provide an introduction to creating maps with GeoCommons.





Applications for Education
Creating maps on GeoCommons is definitely a step up in complexity from creating simple Google Maps. Students could use GeoCommons to create visualizations in which they attempt to show correlations between physical geography datasets and human geography datasets.

Monday, August 24, 2009

GeoCommons Map Maker - Make Data Based Maps

GeoCommons Finder is a great place to find publicly shared data sets for use in KML files (Google Earth file format). GeoCommons Maker provides users a quick and easy way to take the datasets found in GeoCommons Finder and display those datasets on a map. Users can create multi-layered maps and customize the way those layers are displayed.

The video below offers a brief overview of how to create maps using GeoCommons Maker.


A product similar to GeoCommons Maker that you may want to try is the Thematic Mapping Engine.

Applications for Education
GeoCommons Maker is as easy, if not easier, to use as Google Maps. The benefit of using GeoCommons Maker is that students can find datasets without having to search the Internet for them. This should save time when you're trying to complete a lesson plan in one sitting. GeoCommons has datasets that are relevant for use in Social Studies, Math, and Science.

Update: as was pointed out in the comments, maps made in GeoCommons Maker can be embedded into a blog or website.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

GeoCommons Map Maker - One Stop for Data and Building

GeoCommons Finder is a great place to find publicly shared data sets for use in KML files (Google Earth file format). This week GeoCommons launched GeoCommons Maker. GeoCommons Maker provides users a quick and easy way to take the datasets found in GeoCommons Finder and display those datasets on a map. Users can create multi-layered maps and customize the way those layers are displayed. Click here to see a two layer map displaying demographic data regarding single parent households in the United States.

A product similar to GeoCommons Maker that you may want to try is the Thematic Mapping Engine.

Applications for Education
GeoCommons Maker is as easy, if not easier, to use as Google Maps. The benefit of using GeoCommons Maker is that students can find datasets without having to search the Internet for them. This should save time when you're trying to complete a lesson plan in one sitting. GeoCommons has datasets that are relevant for use in Social Studies, Math, and Science.

The only drawback to GeoCommons Maker is that the maps students create aren't easily embedded into blogs or wikis.