Showing posts with label Google Arts & Culture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Google Arts & Culture. Show all posts

Friday, September 23, 2022

The Descent of the Serpent - A New Google Arts and Culture Game

This week Google Arts and Culture released a new game for students. The game is called The Descent of the Serpent and it's available to play in your web browser or in the Google Arts and Culture apps for Android and iOS. 

The Descent of the Serpent is a game through which students can learn about civilizations of ancient Mesoamerica. Students play the game from the perspective of one of four characters representative of mythological figures in Mesoamerican culture. Students then navigate through four levels of the game in a quest to find and recover twenty lost objects and return them to Chichen Itza before the solar equinox. 

The game play of The Descent of the Serpent is a little reminiscent of Legend of Zelda (yes, I realize that's a reference point that dates me as a late Gen-Xer). Players navigate through scenes while trying to dodge obstacles and objects in their quest to find the missing artifacts. When players find an artifact they are shown a little bit of information about its history and significance. 

The Descent of the Serpent can be played in story mode or in challenge mode. The story mode allows players to keep playing regardless of how many times they hit a dead-end or get hit by an object. The challenge mode gives players just five "lives" before they lose the game and have to start over. 


Applications for Education

I played The Descent of the Serpent for about 15 minutes this morning then had to force myself to stop because I could have easily gone down a rabbit hole of playing it for much longer (note, I'm not skillful when it comes playing video games in general). I found the little pop-ups of information after finding each artifact interesting. That said, I look at the game as a fun way to introduce students to ancient Mesoamerican history and not as a replacement for complete lessons.


Thursday, July 21, 2022

Arts, Culture, and Geography Games to Share in Google Classroom

One of Larry Ferlazzo's recent blog posts about Ideas That Changed the World prompted me to spend time playing around with some of the games on the Google Arts & Culture site this morning. 

Play with Arts & Culture offers more than a dozen interactive games for students to play to test their knowledge and to learn about the connections between art, culture, and geography. The collection of games includes things like jigsaw puzzles to reassemble famous works of art, timeline-based games about cultural events, crosswords, online coloring activities, and location identification games. Some of the games can be played collaboratively and all of the games can be shared directly into Google Classroom as announcements and or assignments. 

Watch Art, Culture, and Geography Games to learn more about how to play the games in Play with Arts & Culture



On a related note, it is possible to share any of the stories in Google Arts & Culture with your students through Google Classroom. That process is demonstrated in this short video.


Offline Google Arts & Culture Activities
In addition to all of the online games, Google Arts & Culture offers a PDF of activities for students. This free PDF includes coloring pages, mazes, and connect-the-dots games for students. 

Monday, October 18, 2021

How to Share Google Arts & Culture Experiences in Google Classroom

Last week Google Arts & Culture published a great online exhibit titled Walk the Great Wall. It's a fantastic colleciton of Street View imagery and multimedia stories about the Great Wall of China. As I wrote last week, Walk the Great Wall includes detailed imagery of the bricks of the wall, short lessons about the construction of the Great Wall, stories of myths and legends of the Great Wall, and lots of imagery of the Great Wall from end to end in all four seasons of the year.  

The only "problem" with the Walk the Great Wall Google Arts & Culture exhibit is that it is so large that if you want all your students to look at a specific section of it all at once, you have to share individual sections with your students instead of the whole exhibit. Fortunately, Google does make it relatively easy to share just a section of a Google Arts & Culture exhibit with your students. In this new video I demonstrate exactly how to do that. 



Applications for Education
Sharing a specific section of a Google Arts & Culture exhibit is a good way to get all of your students looking at and discussing an element of an exhibit at the same time. Alternatively, you could assign different sections of an exhibit to groups of students then have them share observations with the whole class. 

The method that I demonstrated in the video can also be used with other learning management systems. Simply get the sharing link from the section of the exhibit that you want to share and then manually paste it into an assignment in your LMS instead of using the Google Classroom button.

Thursday, October 14, 2021

Tour the Great Wall of China - A New Google Arts & Culture Experience

After Google announced the closure of Google Expeditions earlier this year Google Arts & Culture became the place to go to find much of the virtual imagery that was available in Expeditions. The library of imagery and stories in Google Arts & Culture has steadily grown throughout the year. The latest big addition to that library is found in the new Walk the Great Wall exhibit that was introduced yesterday

Walk the Great Wall includes a virtual tour of the Great Wall of China in which you can view immersive, 360 imagery of the towers and the wall. The Walk the Great Wall exhibit also includes detailed imagery of the bricks of the wall, short lessons about the construction of the Great Wall, stories of myths and legends of the Great Wall, and lots of imagery of the Great Wall from end to end in all four seasons of the year. 

Learn With Google Arts & Culture
Earlier this year Google introduced a new resource for teachers called Learn With Google Arts & Culture. It is a collection of lesson plans, Street View imagery, and virtual tours based around the content found in Google Arts & Culture

The lesson plans are what make Learn With Google Arts & Culture worth bookmarking. There are dozens of detailed lesson plans available through Learn With Google Arts & Culture. The lesson plans are very detailed and include links for students and teachers to follow. Much of each lesson plan that I reviewed could be completed by students working independently. 

In this video I provide an overview of Learn With Google Arts & Culture. The overview includes:

  • How to access the lesson plans. 
  • How to share specific portions of Google Arts & Culture in your Google Classroom. 
  • How to create collections of artifacts from Google Arts & Culture to share with your students. 

Friday, May 7, 2021

Google Arts & Culture + Apple Classroom

Google is ending support for Google Expeditions on June 30th. A few weeks ago I shared a short list of alternatives to Google Expeditions. In that blog post I mentioned that one of features of Expeditions that I'll miss most is the ability to remotely guide or pace students through a virtual reality experience. 

I still haven't found something that works in the exact same way as the guide mode in Google Expeditions. That said, teachers who have iPads in their classrooms can guide students through scenes in the Google Arts & Culture app through the use of Apple's Classroom app

Applications for Education
The downside to using Google Arts & Culture on an iPad instead of on a phone is that the VR experience isn't immersive like it is if you're using a VR viewer. The upside is that as a teacher you can provide more assistance to young students as they use the app.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

Tuesday, December 8, 2020

A Virtual Tour and Videos for Learning About Breaking the Sound Barrier

Chuck Yeager died yesterday at the age of 97. He was the first person to fly an airplane faster than the speed of sound. The BBC's article about Chuck Yeager's passing included some archival footage of his flight in the Bell X-1 that he flew. Watching that footage reminded me of the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum's VR Hangar app which included virtual tours of the X-1 and other famous aircraft and spacecraft. 

Unfortunately, the VR Hangar app is no longer available. But you can see the Bell X-1 in the Google Arts and Culture app as well as on the Google Arts and Culture website.

TED-Ed offers a lesson about breaking the sound barrier. The lesson is called The Sonic Boom Problem and it explains how a sonic boom is created and how math is used to predict the path of a sonic boom in the atmosphere. 



Here's some archival footage of Yeager's flight in the Bell X-1.