Showing posts with label Google Bookmarks. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Google Bookmarks. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Google Announces the Shut-down of Seven Services

As part of their efforts to streamline their services, yesterday Google announced plans to shut-down seven services. The two services being shut-down of the most interest to me and readers of this blog are Timeline search and Bookmarks lists.

To be clear, Google Bookmarks will continue to exist. Google Bookmarks lists, which to me was one of its best features, will stop functioning on December 19. The bookmarks that are in your lists will continue to be accessible, but you will not be able to create new lists or share lists anymore. I will probably continue to use Google Bookmarks, but will probably spend more time on my lightly-used Diigo, Catch.com, and Evernote accounts.

Google Search Timeline is one of my favorite search tools that unfortunately is going the way of Wonder Wheel. You will still have the option to refine searches by date by entering dates in the refinement tool on the left-hand side of the search results page. You can also continue to use Google Trends and Search Insights.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Do You Use RSS? Where are Your Bookmarks?

This morning Tom Daccord and I are introducing a group of educators to RSS, Google Bookmarks, Diigo, and blogging. I like to start with RSS because it then gives us content we can use for social bookmarking activities. One of my favorite resources for introducing RSS continues to be Common Craft's RSS in Plain English (embedded below).


And, of course, one of my favorite resources for introducing social bookmarking is Common Craft's Social Bookmarking in Plain English. (embedded below).


Applications for Education
Some of the ideas we'll share this morning regarding RSS is to keep up to date on the sites and blogs you use for professional learning. We also discuss the idea of creating folders in Google Reader in which you subscribe to a set of blogs that you want students to read and sharing that folder with students through email or a widget on a classroom blog. For example, if every student in your classroom has a blog that he or she maintains you could create a folder that contains all of those blogs' feeds.

The reason that we introduce teachers to online/ social bookmarking services is for the fairly obvious benefit of being able to access your bookmarks from any computer. More importantly we introduce teachers to sharing bookmarks with other professionals and with students. By sharing bookmarks everyone can benefit from a community's bookmarking activities.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

How to Use Google Bookmarks

One of the parts of the Google Across the Curriculum workshop that I ran today was about using Google Bookmarks. For most of the participants in today's workshop using a web-based bookmarking service instead of a browser-based service was a new and welcome concept. The slides below were the basis for the hand-outs that today's participants received. For more more Google tools tutorials like this one, check out my Google Tutorials page.



If you're wondering about the benefits of using a social bookmarking service, watch Common Craft's explanation below.

If you're reading this in RSS you may need to click through to see the video.

Monday, March 21, 2011

Keeping Track of the Good Stuff

On Saturday I shared with you how to keep up with the flow of good information that is found on the web. Today, I'd like to share with you some strategies and tools for keeping track of the good stuff that you find through your RSS reader.

Use an Online Bookmarking Service.
Yes, you can use the bookmark option in your web browser, but those bookmarks are only saved on one computer. If you use multiple computers, you will want a way to access your bookmarks from every computer you use. Online bookmarking services allow you to save links and snippets of text (helpful for remembering why you bookmarked a site) into one account that you can access anywhere. There are a lot of good online bookmarking services, Diigo and Evernote are very popular, but I use Google Bookmarks for this purpose. Google Bookmarks is a part of my Google account which means that I don't have to remember multiple account names and passwords. Below you will find two tutorials for getting started with Google Bookmarks.




Another popular online bookmarking service is Delicious. Although it was widely rumored last December that Delicious might shut-down, it is still chugging along as a part of Yahoo. The Common Craft video below explains the benefits of social bookmarking and how to use Delicious.


Diigo has been popular with educators for quite a while. Some of its features moved behind a paywall last year, but it's still a good service to consider as a replacement for Delicious. Last fall,  Jose Picardo (I highly recommend his blog) posted a quick guide to annotating using Diigo. He created the video for his students and if you're considering using Diigo with your students it could be very useful for you too. The video is embedded below.

A Guide to Annotating using Diigo from José Picardo on Vimeo.


Bookmarking and Sharing Links in Google Reader.
So after reading about RSS in Saturday's post you signed up for Google Reader and started subscribing to your favorite blogs. That's great! Now let's look at how you can save and share the stories you find interesting in your Google Reader.

When you come across a story in your Google Reader account that you want to save for quick access later, you can simply star it and it will be added your "starred stories" category. You can go back and access those stories later.
Step 1.

Step 2.

You can also share stories from within Google Reader. The Google-produced video below shows you how to do this.

Friday, December 17, 2010

How to Prepare for the Delicious Shut Down

Update: in a blog post this afternoon Yahoo says they might not shut down Delicious. I read it, it doesn't look promising. Check it out

The tech and education blog-o-spheres are humming with the news that Yahoo is probably going to shut down the popular social bookmarking service Delicious (Read Write Web has two good stories about it here and here). In an effort to help you prepare for the closure of Delicious, I created this short post.

Before looking at alternatives to Delicious, let's get your bookmarks out of Delicious so that you can use them somewhere else.

Step 1: Log into your Delicious account and click on "settings." (Settings should appear in the upper right corner of your screen). 

Step 2: Select "export/ backup bookmarks."

Step 3: Choose whether or not you want to export the notes and tags you've assigned to your bookmarks. Depending on which application you plan to use your bookmarks in in the future, trying to import tags and notes might cause some glitches. To play it safe I exported my bookmarks twice, once with tags and notes, once without tags and notes.


Step 4: Save the HTML to your local computer. Once you have the file you can import it into any browser and into most social bookmarking services.

Alternatives to Delicious
If your school is a Google Apps for Education school, the first alternative to Delicious that I would consider is Google Bookmarks. In Google Bookmarks you can create lists that you can share publicly or keep private. One of the nice things about the list feature is that you can choose to make some of your lists public while keeping others private. Just like with Google Docs, you can invite other people to share and add to your work. Lists in Google Bookmarks aren't limited to simple text links. You can add maps, images, and videos to your lists in Google Bookmarks. Additionally, any of your Google Docs files can be added to your lists in Google Bookmarks. Google Bookmarks can be added to your existing Google account so you don't have remember a new user name or password to take advantage of the service.


If you do end up going with Google Bookmarks, I'd recommend also looking at Yawas. Yawas is a free web annotation tool for Firefox and Chrome built on top of Google Bookmarks. Yawas enables you to highlight text on any webpage and save it in your Google Bookmarks account. Once Yawas is installed just highlight the text on a page, right click, and send it to your Google Bookmarks account.
 
Diigo has been popular with educators for quite a while. Some of its features moved behind a paywall earlier this year, but it's still a good service to consider as a replacement for Delicious. Last fall,  Jose Picardo (I highly recommend his blog) posted a quick guide to annotating using Diigo. He created the video for his students and if you're considering using Diigo with your students it could be very useful for you too. The video is embedded below.

A Guide to Annotating using Diigo from José Picardo on Vimeo.

Memonic is a tool for curating collections of information from the web. Memonic's key function is to give users the power to clip sections of websites and build them into a personal collection. Along with the clipping of information, users can add commentary to each item they place into their personal accounts. For example, if I clipped a paragraph from iLearnTechnology I could also add some notes for myself about that paragraph. There are a couple of ways to add content to the folders within a Memonic account. The easiest way to add content to a Memonic account is to use the Memonic bookmarklet for Firefox. After the bookmarklet is installed, users can click it at anytime while they're browsing the web to add content to their Memonic folders. Alternatively, users can add content by typing the url of a desired page into the Memonic "web clipper" that is present within every Memonic user's account page. Watch a holiday-themed introduction to Memonic below.


What are your suggestions for alternatives to Delicious?

Monday, December 6, 2010

Yawas - Web Annotation Tool for Firefox and Chrome

Yawas is a free web annotation tool for Firefox and Chrome built on top of Google Bookmarks. Yawas enables you to highlight text on any webpage and save it in your Google Bookmarks account. Once Yawas is installed just highlight the text on a page, right click, and send it to your Google Bookmarks account. Watch the video below to see Yawas in action.


Applications for Education
Yawas, like other web annotation tools, can be helpful for students conducting research online. Rather than bookmarking an entire page or site and then wondering what it was about that page that they needed, they can select just what they need and save just what they need. And it should go without saying that clipping part of a page is much much better than printing many pages from the web. 

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

InSlices - Bookmark and Share Sections of Websites

InSlices is an online bookmarking service that allows users to bookmark an entire website or bookmark and save just a section of a website. In many ways InSlices is similar to iCyte and Memonic which I wrote about here. InSlices makes it easy to save and share sections of a website through their Firefox add-on or with their browser bookmarklet. Once you have InSlices installed in your browser, click the InSlices icon anytime to bookmark a website and cut a section of it to save and share. You can cut and bookmark as little as a sentence or as much as an entire page. Cutting and bookmarking isn't limited to text, you can also cut and bookmark an image or video from a webpage. Watch the video below to learn more.

Inslices - Save & Share What Matters! from Slice Factory on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
InSlices could be a very good tool for students to use while conducting research on the Internet. Sometimes students bookmark sites while conducting research but when they go back to those sites they forget what it was they needed on those sites. InSlices solves that problem by letting users cut out just the part of the site they want to use later.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Seven Tools for Organizing Web Research
Nine Tools for Collaboratively Creating Mind Maps
Google Bookmarks Gets Collaborative & How To Do It

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Google Bookmarks Gets Collaborative & How to do it

Earlier today Google introduced a new collaborative feature for Google Bookmarks. Now in your Google Bookmarks you can create lists that you can share publicly or keep private. One of the nice things about the new list feature is that you can choose to make some of your lists public while keeping others private. Just like with Google Docs, you can invite other people to share and add to your work. Lists in Google Bookmarks aren't limited to simple text links. You can add maps, images, and videos to your lists in Google Bookmarks. Additionally, any of your Google Docs files can be added to your lists in Google Bookmarks. Google Bookmarks can be added to your existing Google account so you don't have remember a new user name or password to take advantage of the service.

Embedded below is a tutorial for using Google Bookmarks including the list feature.

Applications for Education
Students can use Google Bookmarks to collaborate on the research process for a project. By sharing lists they can all add relevant links, images, and videos to one list that they then use to create a final product. As a professional learning tool Google Bookmarks could be used by a group of educators to share resources related to a particular area of interest. For example, I could create a list of US History resources to share with the other US History teachers in my district.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Google Tools Tutorials
Learn from My Google Docs Mistake
How to Publish a Quiz Using Google Forms