Showing posts with label Google Workspaces. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Google Workspaces. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

The Old Version of Google Sites is Finally Shutting Down - Here's How to Use the Current Version

For nearly five years now Google has been saying that the old, "classic" version of Google Sites would be closing "soon." It appears that they really mean it this time. In an email to Google Workspaces domain administrators and in this blog post, Google has announced that on May 15th the ability to create new websites using the old version of Google Sites will be removed. Then on December 1st editing of sites made with the classic version of Google Sites will be disabled. And on January 1, 2022 all sites made with the classic version of Google Sites will be offline. 

Transition from Classic Google Sites to Current Google Sites

People who are still using the classic version of Google Sites can transition to the current version of Google Sites by following the directions in this video. It should be noted that not all features found in the classic version of Google Sites are available in the current version of Google Sites. 

Create a Website with Google Sites

The current version of Google Sites is easier to use and more aesthetically pleasing than the classic version. And there are some helpful features in the current version that were not available in the classic version. Those features include automatic resizing for mobile devices, drag-and-drop positioning of page elements, and page-level display settings. Watch this video to learn how to make your first website with Google Sites. 


Three Quick Ideas for Using Google Sites in Your Classroom

Thursday, April 15, 2021

How to Quickly Duplicate and Sort Jamboard Pages

Jamboard has a lot of handy features and neat uses for in-person and online instruction. I recently outlined a bunch of them in this blog post. This afternoon someone emailed me looking for help with duplicating pages within a Jamboard. Like a lot of things, it's easier to show how to do it than it is to write how to do it. I made this short video to show how you can quickly duplicate, re-use, and sort pages or frames within a Jamboard. 



Applications for Education
Duplicating a page within a Jamboard is helpful when you want to have multiple pages that look the same but you want students to complete a different activity on each one of those pages. For example, I might want to use the same outline map of New England on three pages then one page have students label the states, on the second page have them label capitals, and on the third page label state nicknames.



This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

How to Score Google Forms Questions That Have Multiple Correct Responses

This afternoon I answered an email from a reader who was having a little trouble with Google Forms. She was trying to create a quiz in which some of the questions had multiple correct responses for students to select. For example, "select from this list the names of the people who have walked on the moon." 

To create a question or prompt in Google Forms that has multiple correct responses you need to use "checkboxes" question type. Multiple choice will not work because Google Forms will only allow one selection. By using checkboxes you can have students make multiple selections in response to the question. 

When using the checkbox question type your students can select multiple correct responses to a prompt like, "select the names of the people who have walked on the moon." When you do that you'll find that Google Forms will not give partial credit to a student who selects one correct name and one incorrect name. Therefore, you'll need to change the settings on your Google Form to "release scores after review" instead of the default "release scores immediately" in the form settings. Then you'll have to manually score the question(s) that ask students to make multiple selections. 

In the video that is embedded below I demonstrate the process that I've outlined above for creating and scoring Google Forms questions that have multiple correct responses.  




This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

Monday, April 12, 2021

How to Quickly Record Voice and Video Messages in Gmail

Sometimes it is easier, faster, and more effective to record a video or audio reply to an email than it is to type a response. For example, when I get asked for technical help it is often faster and more effective to create a screencast video than it is to write directions.

Sending an audio message in response to an email can be useful when you need to use some voice inflection to deliver meaning that you might not be able to deliver with just text. This is particularly true when replying to students who are still developing their reading skills or when replying to parents whose first language isn't your own.

In the following videos I demonstrate how to record video and audio messages directly from your Gmail inbox.

Two Ways to Create Videos in Your Gmail Inbox


How to Record and Send Voice Notes in Gmail


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

A Handful of Jamboard Tutorial Videos

Last week I posted a video that contained a quick overview of five Jamboard features that are helpful to teachers and students. That was just the latest in a series of videos that I have made about Jamboard over the last couple of years. To learn more about Jamboard and how you might use it in your classroom, take a look at the following videos. 

I made this video a couple of years ago when many people thought that you had to own one of Google's physical Jamboard interactive whiteboards in order to use Jamboard.Google.com


How to Use Jambord & Screencastify to Make Whiteboard Videos



How to Make Whiteboard Videos With Loom & Jamboard



How to Use Jamboard in Google Meet
You can use Jamboard in Google Meet without having to share your whole screen. 



Making Magnetic Poetry With Jamboard and Google Classroom


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

Friday, April 2, 2021

Two New Google Workspace Features for Students - Including Saving Google Forms in Progress!

This week Google announced two new Google Workspaces for Education features that are sure to be beneficial to students. Both of the new features are things that teachers and students have requested for years. The first is a new set of citation options in Google Documents. The second is a new "save in progress" option in Google Forms.

Google Docs has included a citation and bibliography tool for quite a while. This week Google announced that new citation options are going to be available in Google Docs soon, if you don't already have them. The new options include citing films (movies), television shows, and a catch-all miscellaneous category.

The other new Google Workspaces for Education feature that Google announced this week is an option to save Google Forms responses in progress. Google is calling this feature "draft responses." Draft responses will let students save their responses to a Google Form without having to actually submit the form or leave the form open in the background. Draft responses can be saved for up to thirty days. Students will need to be signed into a Google Workspaces for Education account in order to save their responses in progress.

Draft responses in Google Forms is a beta product. Your Google Workspaces for Education domain administrator will need to apply for the beta in order for your school to use it. Domain administrators can apply for the beta here.

Applications for Education
As I mentioned above, the ability to save Google Forms responses in progress is a feature that teachers have requested for years. This feature will remove some of the pressure to give students a finite period of time to complete a quiz or other activity in Google Forms. I have never been a fan of timed quizzes so this new feature is particularly appealing to me.
 
The new options for citing sources in Google Documents is also going to be helpful to students. In particular, I foresee it being helpful to students in film studies classes as well as history students who might be viewing archival television news broadcasts.

On a related note, here's how to use the citation tool in Google Docs and here's how to create a quiz in Google Forms.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin , 711Web, and Today Headline.

Five Jamboard Features You Should Know How to Use

In the last year Jamboard has become one of my favorite tools for online and hybrid instruction. I often use it in place of Zoom's whiteboard function because I can create multiple page whiteboards that I then share with my students via Google Classroom. My students can then take notes on their own copies of the Jamboard and modify their copies of the Jamboard. I also like using Jamboard to give students diagram templates that they then complete on their own. Those features of Jamboard and more are highlighted in my new video, Five Jamboard Features You Need to Know.

In the following video you can learn:

1. How to use version history in Jamboard and how to name versions. 

2. How to quickly duplicate objects and why that's helpful.

3. How to export Jamboards as PDFs. 

4. How to set custom backgrounds in Jamboard. 

5. How to create and distribute Jamboard templates. 



This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

My Most Popular Tutorials in March

As I mentioned in today's episode of Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions and Share Cool Stuff, my YouTube channel now has nearly 35,000 subscribers watching my tutorial videos. On my channel I cover everything from how to make a Google Form to how to make a green screen video to how to map spreadsheet data. Here's a list of the ten most-watched tutorial videos on my YouTube channel in March.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

How to Create Comic Strips in Google Slides



How to Add a Timer to Your PowerPoint Slides



How to Create Videos on a Chromebook - No Extensions or Apps Required



Threadit - Google's Alternative to Flipgrid?!


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

Friday, March 26, 2021

Google Meet Transcripts Automatically Saved as New Google Docs

For Google Meet users one of the easiest ways to improve the accessibility of your live online instruction is to enable captions during your meetings. A transcript of those captions can be quite helpful to students who miss the meeting and or those who want to revisit the highlights of the meeting. Google Meet Transcripts by Scribbl is a new Chrome extension that can make the process of creating a meeting transcript and sharing it easier than ever before. 

Google Meet Transcripts by Scribbl will record all of the captions that are generated during a Google Meet call. When the meeting is over a Google Document containing the transcript is automatically generated for you. The best part is that the transcript is time-stamped! The time-stamps make the transcript easier to read and easier to find a section of the meeting without having to read through the entire transcript. The transcript is a Google Document so you can share it just like you would any other Google Document including publishing a copy for each student via Google Classroom. 



It should be noted that if you try this extension and it doesn't work the first time, check to make sure that you don't already have another caption-saving extension enabled in Chrome. If that's the case, disable the other one before running Google Meet Transcripts by Scribbl

Applications for Education
Google Meet Transcripts by Scribbl could be a great tool for teachers who want to have a written record of what they said and what their students said during an online class meeting. (If you record students' comments make sure you are in compliance with your school's policy about recording). It could also be useful for recording the notes or minutes from a staff meeting that is held in Google Meet.

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

5 Ideas for Using Threadit in School

This is an excerpt of my full article that I published on my other site, Practical Ed Tech

Threadit is Google's new tool for recording webcam and screencast videos. The best way to think of it is as "Google Docs meets Flipgrid." Here's my preliminary list of five ways to use it in school. 

  • Group Video Presentations
  • Asynchronous Video Discussions
  • Segmented Tutorial Videos
  • Asynchronous Video Office Hours
  • "Feel Good" Group Messages
Details on all five of those ideas can be read here on Practical Ed Tech

My complete video overview of Threadit can be seen here on my YouTube channel or as embedded below. 

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Two Ways to Create Videos in Your Gmail Inbox

Last week Google introduced a new video recording tool called Threadit. A Chrome extension is one aspect of what Threadit offers. With the Threadit Chrome extension installed you can record a video without leaving your Gmail inbox. Threadit is now the second tool that I can recommend for recording screencast videos directly from your inbox. Loom's Chrome extension is the first tool that I recommended for making screencast videos directly from your inbox. Both tools are demonstrated in this new video


Learn more about all of Threadit's features in this post on Practical Ed Tech

Applications for Education

Both of these tools provide an easy way to reply to requests for tech help. Creating a quick screencast video to answer a student's or a colleague's question about how to do something on his or her computer can be a lot more efficient than trying to write step-by-step directions. 

Wednesday, March 17, 2021

A New Look for Presenting With Google Slides

On Monday Google announced a change to the presentation menu in Google Slides. Yesterday afternoon I got to try it for the first time. The new Google Slides presentation menu is a great improvement over the old one!

Just like before you still need to click the "present" button in the Slides editor. You'll notice the changes after doing that. When you enter the full presentation mode you'll notice that the large menu of presentation tools that used to be in the bottom, left corner of your slides is now gone! That large menu has been replaced by a tiny, easy-to-miss, menu that only appears when you hover your cursor over the bottom, left corner of your slides. When the menu does appear it will only show the number of the slide that you're on an arrow to advance your slides. To get the full list of presentation options you'll have to open the little "three dot" menu that appears next to the slide advancement arrow. See my screenshot below for picture of the new menu when opened. 


I love the change that Google has made to the Slides presentation format. The new "hidden" menu is far less obtrusive than the old menu. Watch my video below to see the new menu in action. 

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Jamboard Now Offers Version History

This school year Google's Jamboard has become one of my go-to tools for hybrid instruction. Yesterday, Google added a feature to Jamboard that I'm excited to finally see. That feature is version history. 

Version history in Jamboard works just like version history in Google Docs and Google Slides. To access it simply open the little "three dots" menu next to the share button in Jamboard. Once you open that menu you'll see a new option for "see version history" at the bottom of the menu. Click on "see version history" and you'll see a list of time-stamped versions or revisions of the Jamboard. 

Just like in Google Docs and Google Slides you can name the different versions of a Google Jamboard. And just like in Docs and Slides you can revert back to previous version with just one click. 


Applications for Education
Version history in Jamboard could be useful when students are working together on a brainstorming activity or, as my students were doing yesterday, a flowchart creation activity. Students can work for a while on a Jamboard then stop and talk about the various versions they've made. If they decide that a previous version was better, they can quickly revert back to it.

On a related note, here's an overview of how to use Jamboard in Google Classroom

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

How to Download Google Meet Video Call Recordings

A few months ago Google introduced the option for teachers to record Google Meet video calls in some versions Google Workspaces. If you have that option and your school allows it, recording a Google Meet is a good way to save a lesson and publish it for students who missed the first time to go back and watch it. 

Before publishing the recording of a lesson conduct via Google Meet you might want to edit out the beginning of the meeting when you're doing "housekeeping" stuff before the lesson actually begins. To edit the recording you'll need to download the recording then upload it into your video editor of choice (I'd recommend WeVideo or iMovie). In this short video I demonstrate how to download the recording of a Google Meet video call. Remember, any Google Meet that is recorded will automatically be saved to a folder in your Google Drive. 



On a related note, here's an overview of ten Google Meet features teachers should know how to use.

Sunday, March 7, 2021

How to Quickly Find the Sum of a Spreadsheet Column

Right now some of my students are designing their own Arduino projects. I have money for them to spend on materials, but they have to stay within the budget allotted to them. I'm having them use Google Sheets to keep track of materials and budget. Last week I noticed one student tallying her materials cost by hand. I used that as a chance to show the class how to use the built-in sum function in Google Sheets to tally the value of a column. 

A few years ago I made a video about about using the sum function in Google Sheets. That video is embedded below.  

Saturday, March 6, 2021

How to Change Your Google Account Profile Image & Why You Should Change It

When your school issues you a Google Workspaces for Education account your profile picture will just be a simple letter icon featuring your initials. Many people leave it that way only because they don't know how easy it is to change it. In the video below I demonstrate how to change your Google profile image.



Applications for Education
Changing your Google account profile image can help with name recognition so that parents begin to put a face with a name as soon as they start receiving emails from you. They won't have to wait until the first parent-teacher conference or open house night to make the association between your face and name.

If you have more than one teacher in your district with the same name or similar names (at one point there were three Mr. Burns and a Mr. Byrne in my district) students seeing an email with your profile picture can visually confirm that they are emailing the correct person.

On a related note, a lot of people don't realize that there is a difference between signing into a Chrome profile and signing into a Google account. I explained the difference in this short video

Thursday, March 4, 2021

Why My Dogs Have Email Addresses and Your Dog or Cat Should Too

People often get a kick out of learning that my dogs have their own email addresses. You can send them email at Mason or Fionn (at) freetech4teachers.com and they'll get back to you as soon as they learn to type.

My dogs have email addresses because I conduct a lot of workshops throughout the year and I don't always want to use my personal email account to either register for a service or to demonstrate a function on a big screen. By using the fake email accounts that I've created for my dogs I don't have to clutter my personal email with lots of account registrations that I may or may not use again. Likewise, I don't have to open my personal accounts on a big screen in front of a group.

The other reason that I use my dogs' email accounts to register for services is so that I can demonstrate how to use a site or app from square one. For example, when I conduct Google Workspaces workshops I will use Mason's email account to demonstrate all facets of setting-up an account, adjusting settings, and adding new content to the account. By doing it this way new users see all steps on my screen the same as they will on their own screens.

If you find yourself conducting a lot of training sessions for colleagues or students, take a minute or two to create a fake email account for demonstration purposes.

How to Make a Copy of a Google Doc That Isn't Directly Shared With You

From time to time I publish charts and other digital hand-outs that I have created in Google Documents. For example, I recently shared this chart comparing student blogging tools and this chart comparing multimedia timeline creation tools. When I share those charts I publish them as Google Documents marked as "view only." If you want to make copies of the charts you can do so by following the steps outlined in the short video embedded below.



On a related note, you can search for any publicly shared Google Docs, Slides, or Sheets by following the steps outlined in the video below.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

How to Make Sure Students Aren't Unsupervised in Google Meet Video Calls

Google Workspace for Education users finally have a way to make sure that students aren't hanging out in a Google Meet without a teacher. 

Yesterday afternoon Google announced that teachers can now end Google Meet calls for all participants at once. Now when hosts leave a Google Meet call they will see an option to let others stay in the meeting or end the meeting for everyone. Students will be automatically disconnected when a teacher (host) chooses to end the meeting for everyone. 

If you use meeting nicknames in conjunction with the new option to end the meeting for all participants, you can ensure that students aren't hanging out in a Google Meet call without your supervision. 



As is usual with new features in Google Workspaces, this new Google Meet option is available to some users right now and will be available to all Google Workspaces for Education users in the next couple of weeks. It's important to note that this feature is only available to Google Workspaces for Education users and not to those using other versions of Google Workspaces (formerly known as G Suite for Education).

Monday, February 22, 2021

What's New in G Suite for Education - It's Not Called That Anymore!

Last week was a vacation week for my school and many others in New England. If you were on vacation or you just don't obsessively follow all things Google like I do, you may have missed that Google has changed the name of G Suite for Education to Google Workspaces for Education. For the most part, the name change doesn't have an impact on the day-to-day use of Google products by teachers like you and me. 

If you're curious about what's new with Google Workspaces for Education and the various versions of it, watch this short video in which I provide a run-down of the changes. I also made a short slideshow about the changes. You can see those slides here or as embedded below.