Showing posts with label Jamboard. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jamboard. Show all posts

Monday, August 30, 2021

Five Ideas for Using Google Jamboard This Fall

A couple of weeks ago I published an excerpt from The Practical Ed Tech Handbook. That excerpt mentioned a couple of ways to use Google Jamboard in online and in-person classroom settings. This morning I had a reader reach out to me to ask if I had any other suggestions that she could pass along to the teachers in her middle school. Between my blog and my YouTube channel I was able to come up with five ideas for using Jamboard in your classroom this fall. 

Group Brainstorming Sessions
Jamboard can be used to host group brainstorming sessions. In larger classes I break students into smaller groups and have each group work on a specific page within the Jamboard session. At the end of the session we review the ideas from each page and put the most popular ones on a final page. Here's an overview of how to use Jamboard in Google Classroom

Map Labeling Activities
I like to use Jamboard to create templates for activities for students to complete. Last summer I made a mapping template to show a colleague how Jamboard can be used in a geography lesson. The process for using Jamboard to create mapping activities can be seen in this video.

Magnetic Poetry
This is an activity in which you create a template that has a bunch of words within little boxes made to resemble refrigerator magnets. You then distribute the template to your students for them to arrange the magnets to create poems. The process for making magnetic poetry activities can be seen here.

Philosphical Chairs
This is a use for Jamboard that was inspired by a question a reader named Chuck sent to me last fall. The idea is to have students move their avatars around the Jamboard to indicate their positions on a given discussion topic. Here's a video explanation of how the activity works.

Create Instructional Videos
Combine the use of a screencasting tool like Screencastify with a series of Jamboard pages and you can create an instructional video. The benefit of using Jamboard as your drawing tool instead of just using the built-in drawing tools in a screencasting tool is that you can distribute your Jamboard drawings and pages separately from the video if you want to. Here's how to use Screencastify and Jamboard together to make an instructional video. 

Friday, August 13, 2021

Poetry, Maps, and Templates - Google Jamboard Activities to Try

This is an excerpt from the 2021-22 version of The Practical Ed Tech Handbook which will be released on Sunday evening (Eastern Time). If you're subscribed to my Practical Ed Tech Newsletter, a copy of the handbook will be sent to you on Sunday.  

Google’s Jamboard became wildly popular during the 2020-21 school year and that popularity doesn’t seem to be wavering as we head into the 2021-22 school year. Part of the reason for that popularity is the flexibility of Jamboard. Besides using it to create simple whiteboard sketches, it can also be used to create templates for activities like magnetic poetry and map identification. 

The process for using Jamboard to create mapping activities can be seen in this video. The process for making magnetic poetry activities can be seen here. Both processes can be modified to create almost any kind of template that you want to distribute to your students. Both videos are embedded below.
 




The process of distributing Jamboard templates is outlined in this video.

Thursday, May 20, 2021

A Math and Map Challenge

This evening while recording Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions & Share Cool Stuff I was reminded of a neat math and map challenge activity from Mathigon. Here's what I wrote about it last year. 

Mathigon's map coloring challenge is to use as few colors as possible to color in all 50 U.S. states without the same color touching two states at the same time. For example, if I color New Hampshire purple, I can't use purple on Vermont, Maine, New York, or Massachusetts but I could use purple on Pennsylvania.

Mathigon's map coloring challenge can be completed online where they offer the same challenge for coloring maps of South America, England, and Germany. But if you send your students to that page they'll be able to quickly click to see the solution to the challenge. So what I'd do instead is print a blank map from a site like Printable World Map then have students try the challenge. Another option would be to upload an outline map to a service like Google's Jamboard to color the map online. Watch my video below to learn how that process works.




This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and TodayHeadline.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

A Handful of Jamboard Tutorial Videos

Last week I posted a video that contained a quick overview of five Jamboard features that are helpful to teachers and students. That was just the latest in a series of videos that I have made about Jamboard over the last couple of years. To learn more about Jamboard and how you might use it in your classroom, take a look at the following videos. 

I made this video a couple of years ago when many people thought that you had to own one of Google's physical Jamboard interactive whiteboards in order to use Jamboard.Google.com


How to Use Jambord & Screencastify to Make Whiteboard Videos



How to Make Whiteboard Videos With Loom & Jamboard



How to Use Jamboard in Google Meet
You can use Jamboard in Google Meet without having to share your whole screen. 



Making Magnetic Poetry With Jamboard and Google Classroom


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

Friday, April 2, 2021

Five Jamboard Features You Should Know How to Use

In the last year Jamboard has become one of my favorite tools for online and hybrid instruction. I often use it in place of Zoom's whiteboard function because I can create multiple page whiteboards that I then share with my students via Google Classroom. My students can then take notes on their own copies of the Jamboard and modify their copies of the Jamboard. I also like using Jamboard to give students diagram templates that they then complete on their own. Those features of Jamboard and more are highlighted in my new video, Five Jamboard Features You Need to Know.

In the following video you can learn:

1. How to use version history in Jamboard and how to name versions. 

2. How to quickly duplicate objects and why that's helpful.

3. How to export Jamboards as PDFs. 

4. How to set custom backgrounds in Jamboard. 

5. How to create and distribute Jamboard templates. 



This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Jamboard Now Offers Version History

This school year Google's Jamboard has become one of my go-to tools for hybrid instruction. Yesterday, Google added a feature to Jamboard that I'm excited to finally see. That feature is version history. 

Version history in Jamboard works just like version history in Google Docs and Google Slides. To access it simply open the little "three dots" menu next to the share button in Jamboard. Once you open that menu you'll see a new option for "see version history" at the bottom of the menu. Click on "see version history" and you'll see a list of time-stamped versions or revisions of the Jamboard. 

Just like in Google Docs and Google Slides you can name the different versions of a Google Jamboard. And just like in Docs and Slides you can revert back to previous version with just one click. 


Applications for Education
Version history in Jamboard could be useful when students are working together on a brainstorming activity or, as my students were doing yesterday, a flowchart creation activity. Students can work for a while on a Jamboard then stop and talk about the various versions they've made. If they decide that a previous version was better, they can quickly revert back to it.

On a related note, here's an overview of how to use Jamboard in Google Classroom

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Some of my Favorites - Jamboard in Google Meet

This week is school vacation week here in Maine. I usually take this week off to go ice fishing on Moosehead Lake. Unfortunately, that's not happening this year. Instead I'll be "staycationing" and working on some projects around home. While on my staycation I'll be sharing some of my personal favorite tools. The integration of Jamboard into Google Meet was one my favorite new things to start this school year.


The old method that I used to combine Google Jamboard and Google Meet was fine, but the new integration is so much easier. In the following video I demonstrate how to launch and use Jamboard in Google Meet. 



Applications for Education
There are a lot of ways to use this new integration of Jamboard and Google Meet. Here are a few of my initial thoughts about it. First, even if only you use Jamboard during the Meet you can still share the Jamboard afterward with your students. Doing that would give them access to view and review any sketches or diagrams that you shared during the Meet. Second, this new integration could be great for students to participate in collaborative mind-mapping or diagramming sessions. Third, you could use the Jamboard to have students share pictures and then conduct a virtual gallery walk in Meet.

Friday, February 5, 2021

Magnetic Poetry With Google Jamboard and Google Classroom

Earlier this week a reader emailed me looking for an alternative to Read Write Think's old Word Mover activity which is no longer available because of the deprecation of Flash. Word Mover was essentially an online version of the old refrigerator word magnets that were popular in the 90's. While the producers of Magnetic Poetry do offer an online version, it's not well-suited to classroom use. My suggestion is to try using Google Jamboard and Google Classroom to create a "magnetic poetry" for your students. 

On Google Jamboard you can create a set of sticky notes with words on them. You could color code the sticky notes to make verbs one color, adjectives another color, and nouns a third color. Once you've made your word bank you can then divide the Jamboard and add directions for writing a poem with the words in the word bank. Finally, share your Jamboard as an assignment in Google Classroom. When you share it in Google Classroom make sure that you choose the option of "make a copy for each student" so that students have their own copies to work on without having to manually make copies for themselves. 

In this short video I explain how to use Google Jamboard and Google Classroom to create online magnetic poetry assignments for your students. 

Thursday, November 12, 2020

Lucidspark - A New Collaborative Online Whiteboard Option

Lucidspark is a new collaborative whiteboard tool from the makers of the popular Lucidchart service. Lucidspark has all of the features that we've come to expect in an online whiteboard tool. It contains tools for placing pre-made shapes, drawing with a pen tool, and adding text to the screen. There is a wide array of color options for all of the elements that you add to your whiteboard in Lucidspark. 

There are two elements of Lucidspark that differentiate it from some of its competitors. First, Lucidspark offers a large gallery of templates that you can apply to your whiteboard. That gallery includes templates for things like concept maps, flowcharts, empathy maps, and story maps. The sharing menu is the other area in which Lucidspark separates itself from some of its competitors. The sharing options in Lucidspark will remind many people of the options found in Google Docs. You can share your Lucidspark pages as "view only," "comment only," and "edit." You can send collaboration invitations via email or by simply posting a link in your LMS. 

Here's a video overview of Lucidspark. 



Applications for Education
Lucidspark, like many other online whiteboard tools, could be a useful tool for teachers conducting live online or hybrid classes. Much like using Jamboard instead of Zoom's whiteboard tool, using Lucidspark when you need to sketch a concept map or illustrate a point enables you to share that sketch later and use it in other places independently of Zoom (or Google Meet or Microsoft Teams). 

Friday, October 9, 2020

The Easiest Way to Use Jamboard in Google Meet

A few weeks ago Google announced that Jamboard would be integrated into Google Meet. Earlier this week that finally happened in all of my Google accounts. This makes it easier than ever to use Jamboard in Google Meet. The old method that I used was fine, but the new integration is so much easier. In the following video I demonstrate how to launch and use Jamboard in Google Meet. 




Applications for Education
There are a lot of ways to use this new integration of Jamboard and Google Meet. Here are a few of my initial thoughts about it. First, even if only you use Jamboard during the Meet you can still share the Jamboard afterward with your students. Doing that would give them access to view and review any sketches or diagrams that you shared during the Meet. Second, this new integration could be great for students to participate in collaborative mind-mapping or diagramming sessions. Third, you could use the Jamboard to have students share pictures and then conduct a virtual gallery walk in Meet.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Jamboard is Now Integrated Into Google Meet

 

Back in June Google started teasing the possibility of Jamboard being integrated into Google Meet. The possibility has come to fruition as yesterday afternoon Google announced that Jamboard is now integrated into Google Meet.

Jamboard can be launched inside of Google Meet by opening the small sandwich menu (the three little dots in the lower, right corner) then choosing "whiteboard." Everyone who is in the meeting will be able to draw on the whiteboard. The best part is that because the whiteboard is a Jamboard, it will save in your Google Drive where you can then share it again for further use after a meeting has ended. 

I'm sure that you already have some ideas for how to use a whiteboard in Google Meet. These are the ideas that jumped into my mind as soon as I read the announcement from Google. 

  • Mind mapping.
  • Collaborating on flowcharts.
  • Brainstorming sessions.
  • Math lessons.
  • Illustrating a sequence of events.
  • Drawing on top of an image.
  • Virtual gallery walks (remember that Jamboard allows you to have multiple pages).
Launching Jamboard in Google Meet is available now for some users and will be rolling out to all users over the next couple of weeks. If you don't see it today, keep checking back. 

On a related note, I recently published an overview of how to use Jamboard in Google Classroom

Friday, September 11, 2020

How to Use Jamboard in Google Classroom

Earlier this week I answered a question from a reader who wanted to know if it was possible to share Google Jamboard drawings through Google Classroom. The answer is yes. Just about anything in your Google Drive can be shared through Google Classroom. The bigger question is, "can it be shared with copies made for each student?" In the case of Jamboard, the answer is also yes. That's what I demonstrate in my new video that is embedded below.


Applications for Education
In yesterday's episode of Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions & Share Cool Stuff I explained that I used Jamboard in my classroom to have students create network diagrams and share those diagrams with me. I created the framework of the diagrams in Jamboard then used the "make a copy for each student" option in Google Classroom so that my students could complete the diagrams as needed without impacting their classmates' work.

Monday, September 7, 2020

Create an Online Philosophical Chairs Activity With Jamboard

Last week I got an interesting question from a reader named Chuck. I'm not sure that my answer or the question has broad appeal, but I found it interesting so I made a video about it. Chuck's question was as follows:

I have been struggling to find a tool that I can use to do Philosophical Chairs in a virtual classroom. The discussion/debate part is no problem, what I need is a tool where students can move an avatar or a picture of themselves to a certain area of the screen to indicate their position on a topic. All students need to see the same screen but the only item they can move is their avatar/picture and nobody else's. If you know Philosophical Chairs then you will immediately see what I am talking about. Do you have any ideas for a tool or a platform that could do this?

I didn't know of a tool that was made specifically for hosting online philosophical chairs activities, but I did think that using Google's Jamboard is one possible solution.


It's important to note that Jamboard won't prevent a student from moving a classmate's avatar so this is a solution that will only work if you can get your kids to respect the rules of the activity. If that's a problem for your students then you might want to try using Padlet as suggested by Rushton Hurley in our latest episode of Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions & Share Cool Stuff.

Friday, June 26, 2020

How to Use Loom to Make a Whiteboard Video

This week I published a couple of videos about making whiteboard-style instructional videos with Screencastify (you can see those videos on my YouTube channel). Of course, Screencastify isn't the only browser-based screencasting tool available to teachers. Loom is also an excellent and popular choice for making screencast videos right from your web browser.

In the following video I demonstrate how I paired Loom and Google's Jamboard to make a whiteboard-style instructional video. One of the tips that I shared in the video is to use the sharing option in Jamboard to give your students a copy of the drawings or sketches that you use in your instructional video.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Jamboard + Screencastify = Whiteboard Video

Yesterday morning someone on Twitter asked me for a recommendation for making a whiteboard video in a web browser without using Seesaw. (By the way, here's how to do it Seesaw). My suggestion was to try using Screencastify to record over the free drawing space provided by Google's online version of Jamboard. The online version of Jamboard is free unlike the physical product of the same name that Google sells. Here's a video of how that process works.


One of the benefits of using Jamboard for this kind of video is that when you are done you can share the Jamboard images with your students. You could even share the Jamboard via Google Classroom so that students have a copy of the process that you demonstrated while making your video.

Friday, May 22, 2020

Another Whiteboard Option for Google Meet Users

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about how to use a whiteboard in Google Meet without screensharing. That method featured using a neat tool called Whiteboard Fi. Some people have had great success using that method and others have asked me for other options. That's what this post will address.

Google's Jamboard is available to use online for free at jamboard.google.com. You can also access it through your Google Drive. Jamboard provides an online whiteboard that you can use for freehand drawings. Like all Google products connected to Google Drive, Jamboard can be used collaboratively. Unlike Google Drawings, Jamboard lets you have multiple pages within the same project. 


How to Use Jamboard and Google Meet Together

If you're using Google Meet to host online classes and need a whiteboard to draw on, Jamboard is a good option. Just open it in a new tab then screenshare with your students. They'll be able to see everything you draw. You can even invite them to draw on a different page in the Jamboard session. Watch my video below to learn how to use Jamboard and Google Meet together.

Monday, March 30, 2020

A Map Coloring Challenge

Last week Maps Mania shared a collection of online and printable map activities for kids and adults. At the bottom of that collection was a link to Mathigon's map coloring challenge. The challenge is to use as few colors as possible to color in all 50 U.S. states without the same color touching two states at the same time. For example, if I color New Hampshire purple, I can't use purple on Vermont, Maine, New York, or Massachusetts but I could use purple on Pennsylvania.

Mathigon's map coloring challenge can be completed online where they offer the same challenge for coloring maps of South America, England, and Germany. But if you send your students to that page they'll be able to quickly click to see the solution to the challenge. So what I'd do instead is print a blank map from a site like Printable World Map then have students try the challenge. Another option would be to upload an outline map to a service like Google's Jamboard to color the map online. Watch my video below to learn how that process works.

Friday, March 8, 2019

How to Use Jamboard Without Owning a Jamboard

In Wednesday's Practical Ed Tech Live episode I suggested having students use Google's Jamboard to collaboratively create drawings. A couple people have emailed me to ask how that is done if you don't own one of Google's physical interactive whiteboards called Jamboards. The answer is that you can simply go to jamboard.google.com in your web browser, sign into your Google account, and start drawing. You can also do the same with the Jamboard Android app and the Jamboard iOS app. Watch my video to see how you can use Jamboard online without owning a physical Jamboard.


Applications for Education
A few student uses for Jamboard include creating mind maps, making flowcharts, and making simple cartoon stories. If they're using Jamboard to make mind maps or flowcharts, don't forget that students can use the text and image tools.