Showing posts with label KML. Show all posts
Showing posts with label KML. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

How to Create Your Own Placemarks in the New Google Earth

A new version of Google Earth was released yesterday. In my initial review of it I was excited that it now works in your web browser while also being disappointed by the lack of creation tools that it contains. Fortunately, you can still put your own multimedia placemarks on Google Earth by importing a KML file In the following video I demonstrate how to create a KML to use in the new version of Google Earth.



Applications for Education
Creating a series of placemarks to display in Google Earth can be a good activity for students that helps them understand the relationship between events and their locations. A classic example of this is having students map the locations of battles of the American Revolution.

I'll be covering how to use Google Earth and Maps on Chromebooks during the Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp this summer. Early registration discounts are available for until the end of the month.


Friday, September 25, 2015

My Reading Mapped is Back!

At about this time two years ago I wrote a post about a great collection of Google Maps and Earth files called My Reading Mapped. Suddenly, six months ago it went offline. This morning I received an email from the developer of My Reading Mapped. The email was an announcement that he has relaunched the site.

On My Reading Mapped you will find KML files (AKA Google Maps & Earth files) for things like historical migration and trade routes, monarchies and republics, famous explorer and conqueror expeditions, and climate change patterns. More than 150 maps are available to download from My Reading Mapped.

Applications for Education
My Reading Mapped is a great resource for social studies teachers to bookmark and share with students. The maps offer an excellent alternative to reading out of a textbook because students can not only read the information they can also quickly explore the areas that they are reading about.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Mapping the Bible In Google Earth

A few years ago I shared a small collection of interactive maps based on Biblical stories. Recently, through the Google Earth Blog, I learned about a collection of Google Earth files that map Biblical stories. The blog Biblical Studies and Technological Tools put together a collection of seven Google Earth files. A couple of the files that I downloaded from the collection were a Complete list of Bible Place KMZ and Biblical Rivers and Bodies of Water (both links trigger KMZ/ KML file downloads).

Applications for Education
These files follow the same format that can be applied to mapping any book. The correlation between place and text can help students have a better understanding of the complete context of what they are studying.

These maps might be useful for anyone teaching a course on religion. The maps also provide a model that students can use to create their own maps of religious stories.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

How to Find Google Earth Files Without Opening Google Earth

One of the things that teachers almost always ask me when I introduce them to Google Earth is, "how do you find all of these files?" Google Earth has a lot of great layers of information built in. Simply open the "layers" drop-down menu in Google Earth and select a layer to view it (remember, the more layers you select the slower Google Earth will run). You can also open the "Earth Gallery" in Google Earth to find and add more layers to your view of Google Earth. You can also search online for KMZ and KML files to view in Google Earth. The directions for doing that are included in the screenshots below (click the images to view them in full size).

Enter a search term. In this case I am looking for files related to World War II. You could also do a search for something like "Maine Seafood." You have to enter a search term and do the search before you will see the screen pictured below.

In the advanced search menu select "file type" then select KMZ or KML.

Alternatively, you can search by file type by entering filetype: KMZ after your search term.

To clarify, you will have to open the file in Google Earth to see its contents. This method is just for finding files to use in Google Earth.

Monday, March 25, 2013

myHistro Offers New Ways to Share Mapped Timelines

myHistro is a timeline builder and map creation tool rolled into one nice package. On myHistro you can build a personal timeline or build a timeline about a theme or event in history. Each event that you place on your timeline can be geolocated using Google Maps. myHistro timelines can be created online or you can use the free iPad app to create events on your timeline. Today, myHistro released a some new ways to share your projects. You can now export your timelines as PDFs, KML files (Google Earth format), or as a CSV file.

The slides below show you how to create timelines in myHistro.



Applications for Education
myHistro has a collaborative aspect as you can invite people to work with you on events or entire stories. To work with you your collaborators will need to register on myHistro. For students over age 13 myHistro has great potential for create digital historical stories.

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Map CIA World Factbook Info with KML Factbook

The KML Factbook is a great tool for creating mapped displays of all manner of demographic, economic, and political data. The data used in the KML Factbook comes from the CIA World Factbook. The KML Factbook allows users to to select datasets from the CIA World Factbook and display that data in Google Maps or in Google Earth. You can also preview your maps using the Google Earth browser plug-in. After creating your map you can download the file to use offline in Google Earth.

Creating a map is a simple matter of selecting a set data set or sets, choosing base map, and defining the colors and size of placemarks. After making your selections KML Factbook generates the map. If you would like to use your own datasets, you can upload them to the KML Factbook.

Applications for Education
The KML Factbook could be a useful tool for students of geography, political science, and global economics. Data maps are good for providing students with a means to visually compare data sets. I can see the KML Factbook being a great resource for students to quickly compare development indicators of countries in a region or continent.

Mapping Data with Spreadsheet Mapper 3

Earlier this week I wrote about using Map a List to place spreadsheet data on a Google Map. Yesterday, the Google Lat Long team released a new Google Spreadsheet script that will allow you to create KML files based on your spreadsheet data. Spreadsheet Mapper 3 allows you to map up to 1,000 placemarks based on your spreadsheet data. And because Spreadsheet Mapper 3 is a part of Google Docs you can share your spreadsheets and maps for collaborative editing. Click here for complete directions on how to use Spreadsheet Mapper 3.

Applications for Education
As I wrote about Map a List, Spreadsheet Mapper 3 could be useful for a classroom genealogy project in which students map the origins of their families. You could also use Spreadsheet Mapper 3 to have students search for an map the locations of things like local history landmarks or geographic features.

Monday, January 25, 2010

Scribble Maps Adds More Map Editing Features

Scribble Maps, a great tool for editing maps, has recently added some excellent features that they're calling Scribble Maps Pro. Usually the "pro" label means a company is charging for the extra features but I was able to register and use the new features for free.

As I noted in my original review of Scribble Maps it is still very easy to draw on your Google Maps and add placemarks to your maps. The new Scribble Maps Pro allows you to import KML files, import spreadsheets, and import SHP files. Importing KML files allows you to add free hand drawing on top of files that you may have already created for Google Maps or Google Earth. Importing spreadsheets makes it easy to quickly add placemarks to a large number of places. SHP file importation allows you to add custom shapes to your maps. Watch the following video to see all of these new options in action.


Applications for Education
One advantage of using Scribble Maps over standard Google Maps in the classroom is the ease with which students can get started. Drawing on a Scribble Map is a very intuitive task. If you want to get students quickly marking-up maps, Scribble Maps is a good choice.
Using Scribble Maps students could create a map on which they highlight various sites and include short text descriptions of those places. Scribble Maps could also be used to quickly draw a simple timeline on a map.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
101 Ways to Teach Geography
Google Earth and Google Maps Help
QuikMaps - Quickly Customize a Google Map

Monday, June 8, 2009

Google SketchUp Design a Shelter Competition

Google and the Guggenheim Museum have teamed up to create the Design a Shelter competition. Participants in the contest have to design a geographically appropriate shelter using Google SkethUp. After designing their shelters contestants must place their shelter models in Google Earth. The competition is an extension of the Guggenheim's Learning by Doing exhibition. All entries must be submitted by August 23. Anyone over the ge of 13 can enter. You can all of the contest requirements here or here.

The video below offers some information that you need to know in order to participate in the contest.


Applications for Education
It's too bad that this contest is being run in the summer (northern hemisphere) because it would be a great project for geography students and or art students to participate in. The concept of the contest could easily be applied to geography and or art class. By creating an environmentally, geographically appropriate shelter students can demonstrate their understanding of climates.


Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
KML Factbook - 2D and 3D Mapped Data Displays
Award Winning Google Earth Lesson Plans
Educational Google Earth Files

Thursday, May 7, 2009

KML Factbook - 2D and 3D Mapped Data Displays

The KML Factbook is a great tool for creating mapped displays of all manner of demographic, economic, and political data. The data used in the KML Factbook comes from the CIA World Factbook. The KML Factbook allows users to to select datasets from the CIA World Factbook and display that data on a 2D or 3D map using Google Maps or the Google Earth browser plug-in. After creating your map you can download the file to use offline in Google Earth.

Creating a map is a simple matter of selecting a set data set or sets, choosing 2D or 3D map, and defining the colors and size of placemarks. After making your selections KML Factbook generates the map. If you would like to use your own datasets, you can upload them to the KML Factbook.










Applications for EducationThe KML Factbook could be a useful tool for students of geography, political science, and global economics. Data maps are good for providing students with a means to visually compare data sets. I can see the KML Factbook being a great resource for students to quickly compare development indicators of countries in a region or continent.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
The BBC News Globe
View Glacier Melt in Google Earth
Google Earth Links You Might Have Missed