Showing posts with label KWL Charts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label KWL Charts. Show all posts

Thursday, September 30, 2021

Getting Started With Padlet - What You Need to Know

Padlet is a tool that I've been using and recommending to others for more than a decade. I started using it back when it was known as Wall Wisher. I often used it to create digital KLW charts with my U.S. History students. Over the years Padlet has evolved by adding more features, updates to the user interface, and updates to privacy and sharing options. If you haven't tried Padlet or you're looking for a tutorial to share with others who are new to using Padlet, take a look at my new video that covers all of the basics that you need to know to get started using Padlet with students.



Some other ideas for using Padlet in your classroom include:

Monday, April 7, 2014

Padlet Introduces Usernames to Replace Email Sign-in

Over the weekend Padlet announced the introduction of usernames to replace email sign-in for your Padlet account. Along with this change Padlet is introducing two related features that should prove to be helpful to teachers and students. First, all of your walls will be moved to a special URL containing your username. This should make it easier to direct students to the Padlet walls you are using in your classroom. Second, Padlet announced that soon you will get a public page containing your username and all your public walls will be shown there.

Applications for Education
Padlet is one of my favorite tools for hosting brainstorming sessions, collecting exit ticket information, and creating collaborative KWL charts. In the guide embedded below I outline how to use in your classroom. You can download the guide here and view it as embedded below.

Monday, February 3, 2014

Padlet Is Now Available in 14 Languages - Here's a Guide to Using It In Your Classroom

Padlet (formerly known as Wall Wisher) is a tool that has been used by teachers in a variety of ways for years now. I've often used as a collaborative know-want-learn chart and as an exit ticket tool. Padlet works on interactive whiteboards, on iPads and Android tablets, and in the web browser on your laptop. Recently, Padlet announced support for three more languages which brings their total supported languages count to fourteen.

In the guide embedded below I provide step-by-step directions for using Padlet in your classroom. The guide also includes ideas and directions for using Socrative and TodaysMeet. You can download the guide here and view it as embedded below.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Three Good Ways to Use Padlet In Your School

This afternoon at the Texas Library Association's annual conference I gave a short presentation about backchannels and informal assessment. Some of you may have seen the Padlet wall that I posted here for a few hours as a part of that presentation. During the presentation I mentioned three ways to use Padlet in schools. Those ways are described below.

Using Padlet as a KWL chart:
Padlet can be used to create a KWL chart that students can contribute to anonymously (or not anonymously if you want them to sign-in). Create a wall, make it public, and ask students to share what they know and what they want to know about a topic. If you allow anonymous posting you might get contributions from shy students who might not otherwise speak-up in class. Of course, if you allow anonymous commenting you should have a conversation with your students about what an appropriate comment looks like. (You could also turn on moderation and approve all notes before they appear). Padlet works well when projected on an interactive whiteboard.

Using Padlet for group research:
A couple of years ago I showed my special education students a short (18 minutes) video about cultural changes that took place in the US during the 1920's. After the video we discussed what they saw. Then I had students search online for other examples of cultural change in the 1920's. When they found examples they put them onto a Wallwisher wall that I projected onto a wall in my classroom. The wall started with just text being added to the wall and quickly progressed to YouTube videos being added to the wall. Once every student had added a video to the wall we stopped, watched the videos, and discussed them.

Using Padlet as a showcase of your students’ work:
If your students are creating digital portfolios, creating slideshows, or producing videos you could use Padlet to display all of your students’ best work on one page. Create the wall, call it something like “my best work this year,” and have your students post links to their works.

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Padlet & Google Docs as Online KWL Charts

Update February 2013 - Padlet was formerly known as Wallwisher. It's still the same great service just with a different name. 

Just a few minutes ago I responded to a Tweet from Meredith Stewart who was looking for some first day of school ideas to use with her 8th grade US History students. My suggestion was to try using Wallwisher to create a KWL (know, want to know, learned) chart that students can write on. Meredith already had that (or something like it) planned for day two, but that's not going to stop me from making a blog post out of this.

I've previously written about using Wallwisher with my special education students to create a collage of videos and pictures that they discovered and we discussed in class. Wallwisher could also be used to create a KWL chart that students can contribute to anonymously (or not anonymously if you want them to sign-in). Create a wall, make it public, and ask students to share what they know and what they want to know about a topic. If you allow anonymous posting you might get contributions from shy students who might not otherwise speak-up in class. Of course, if you allow anonymous commenting you should have a conversation with your students about what an appropriate comment looks like. (You could also turn on moderation and approve all comment before they appear). 

Another option for creating an online KWL chart is to create and publish a Google Docs document. Create the document share it directly with students or its editing permissions to "anyone with the link" and invite students to write on the document. To keep the document organized you should insert a table  that your students will fill-in.