Showing posts with label Lewis and Clark. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lewis and Clark. Show all posts

Friday, July 26, 2019

Lewis & Clark in Google Earth - And Lesson Plans for K-12

This morning while browsing through Google Earth looking for a resource about sharks for Shark Week (I found it) I came across a Google Earth voyage about Lewis and Clark.

The Google Earth voyage titled Explorers: Lewis and Clark contains twelve multimedia placemarkers documenting the outbound and return journey of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Each stop in the voyage contains a gallery of pictures and or videos related to significant landmark on the expedition. The placemarks are displayed on the righthand side of the screen while the map is displayed to the left. You can drag the Google Earth Pegman to the map to see each of the locations in Street View instead of just in satellite imagery. Explorers: Lewis and Clark was constructed using media from the PBS series about the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Lesson Plans
The Smithsonian's Lewis and Clark page offers lesson plans for elementary grades and middle school grades. The elementary school lesson plan is titled Animal Encounters. Animal Encounters is a two part lesson in which students draw pictures and write descriptions of the animals Lewis and Clark encountered on their journey.

DocsTeach offers a detailed activity for high school students to complete by analyzing documents and maps related to Lewis and Clark's expedition. You can customize the activity for your students by creating a free DocsTeach account and then making an editable copy of the activity.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

A Comparison of Historic Journeys

I'm writing this as I zoom through the air at 500+ miles per hour to get home after ISTE 17. Just 100 years ago this trip would have been on a train for days. And 100 years before that the journey would have be counted in weeks and months. That kind of comparison is what you will find on A Race of Discovery.

A Race of Discovery features comparisons of the time it took to complete eleven significant, historical journeys to the time those same journeys would require today. Some of the journeys that you will find on A Race of Discovery are those of Lewis and Clark, Captain Cook, and Christopher Columbus.



Applications for Education
A Race of Discovery does a nice job of showing visitors the significant stops on historical journeys. Unfortunately, the maps are light on details within those stops. That's why I'd use these maps as a model that students could follow to create their own historical journey comparison maps in Google's My Maps. My Maps lets students create maps with multiple layers. I'd have students use that function to create one layer for the historical journey with detailed placemarks then one layer for the current journey.

Discover more ideas for teaching history with technology in my upcoming course, Teaching History With Technology.

H/T to Maps Mania

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Lewis and Clark Lesson Plans - Elementary through College

The journey of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery is one of the most fascinating stories in United States history. It is therefore one of the most frequently taught topics in US History. From early elementary school through college the story of Lewis and Clark is studied by America students. The most comprehensive source of lesson plans about Lewis and Clark is found on the PBS website. If those lesson plans don't suit your needs take a look at some of these other resources that can be used to teach the story of Lewis and Clark.


Elementary School Resources

Scholastic's Lewis and Clark page features a self-guided virtual tour. A great feature of the Scholastic page is the Scholastic Word Wizard that students can use to find the definition of any word on the page.

The Smithsonian's Lewis and Clark page offers lesson plans for elementary grades and middle school grades. The elementary school lesson plan is titled Animal Encounters. Animal Encounters is a two part lesson in which students draw pictures and write descriptions of the animals Lewis and Clark encountered on their journey.

The Science of Lewis and Clark is a lesson plan developed by a teacher at the South Central Service Cooperative in Camden, Arkansas. This lesson plan is focused on the science of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

The Lewis and Clark Exhibit.org provides a series of elementary school lesson plans covering a number of themes related to the Lewis and Clark expedition. The themes addressed include politics and diplomacy, trip planning, animals, trade, plants, and language.

National Geographic Expeditions offers a lesson plan focused on the theme of mapping. The lesson plan also addresses the justification for exploration and land use.

Middle School/ High School Resources
A member of the Google Earth development team created a Google Earth KMZ file depicting the journey of Lewis and Clark. This file could be used by students to plot information along the trail of Lewis and Clark. You may also consider creating a timeline to use in conjunction with Google Earth. You can find a brief tutorial about adding a timeline on the Google Earth Design blog.

The Smithsonian offers a lesson plan designed for middle school use called "Mapping the Unmapped." This is a five part lesson plan that address geography standards as well as writing standards.

The Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Online Exhibition offers lesson plans for middle school and high school. Some of the high school lesson plans introduce students to using primary documents for research and learning.

The National Archives offers a great lesson plan for high school students. The lesson requires students to evaluate primary documents and images.

High School/ College
On iTunes University I found a fourteen part audio and video series about the Louisiana Purchase. Although it is not specifically about Lewis and Clark, the two videos I've watched were beneficial for understanding implications of the Louisiana Purchase as it relates to Lewis and Clark. The course is produced by the University of New Orleans.