Showing posts with label Miro. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Miro. Show all posts

Friday, May 4, 2012

Try Miro - A Free, Open-Source Video & Music Player

You're probably familiar with iTunes and Google Music, but have you tried Miro? Miro is an open source media player available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. With Miro installed on your computer you can search for, watch, listen to, and download media. You can search multiple video sources including YouTube and Hulu within the Miro player. When you find a video that you like, you can download it and store it in the Miro player (to clarify; downloading of YouTube videos is not allowed).

If you choose to allow it, Miro can search your computer for existing media files to add to your Miro player. The Miro player can also be synced with your Android device. The latest version of Miro has the capability to stream between devices over a local network. The video below offers an overview of Miro.


Applications for Education
Miro provides a great way to download videos to use offline. If you work in a school that blocks most video sites, Miro is a good application to have installed on your laptop. Download the videos you want to show to students at home and then play them back at school regardless of Internet availability. The mainstream media channels on Miro provide thousands of videos relevant to all content areas. 

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Miro Video Converter & Miro 3.5

Miro, the open source video player, recently released version 3.5 and the new Miro Video Converter. Miro 3.5 includes a media converter that allows you to convert videos into the best formats for display on iPhones and Android devices. Miro 3.5 also updated subtitle display to give you options for the best display for you. If you don't want to download Miro 3.5 you can choose to download just the Miro Video Converter to convert files to formats for iPhone and Android display.

If you're unfamiliar with Miro, watch the video below for a brief introduction and overview.



Applications for Education
Miro is a great way to download videos to use offline. If you work in a school that blocks most video sites, Miro is a good application to have installed on your laptop. You can download videos within your Miro player in a place where you can get on the Internet and then play them back at any time regardless of Internet availability. The mainstream media channels on Miro provide thousands of videos relevant to all content areas. 

Saturday, July 25, 2009

Miro - Open Source Video and Audio Player

Webware ran an article last night about some recent enhancements to the open source video and audio player Miro. I've written about Miro a few times in the past because I think that it is an excellent alternative to iTunes and Windows Media Player (note, I said it's an alternative not that it is necessarily better). The recent enhancements to Miro are mostly aesthetic changes to the user interface and some database changes that you can read about here.

Miro is a video player that host thousands of video channels aggregated from major media outlets like the AP, CBS, PBS. Miro also aggregates content from user generated video websites like YouTube and Vimeo. The best feature of Miro is that every video you play can be downloaded directly to your computer for use at a later date. The advantage of a downloaded video is that you avoid skipping or stuttering videos resulting from slow Internet connections.

To learn more about Miro, watch this short video overview.


Applications for Educators
Miro is a great way to download videos to use offline. If you work in a school that blocks most video sites, Miro is a good application to have installed on your laptop. You can download videos within your Miro player in a place where you can get on the Internet and then play them back at any time regardless of Internet availability. The mainstream media channels on Miro provide thousands of videos relevant to all content areas.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Miro 2.0 - More HD Video and Download Options

The open source video player Miro impressed me the first time I saw it and it continues to be one of my favorite ways to download and store videos on my computer. Today, Miro released a bunch of updates and improvements including new HD channels and the ability to add more streaming websites, like Hulu, into your Miro player sidebar. The best improvement is the added ability to browse for videos while watching a video.

To learn more about Miro watch this short overview or visit Get Miro.


Applications for Education
Miro is a great way to download videos to use offline. If you work in a school that blocks most video sites, Miro is a good application to have installed on your laptop. You can download videos within your Miro player in a place where you can get on the Internet and then play them back at any time regardless of Internet availability.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Can't Use YouTube? - Try This

Update February 2021: This post was originally published in 2008. The techniques and tools mentioned here are no longer relevant. 

If you have ever wanted to use a YouTube video in your classroom, but couldn't because YouTube is blocked by your school's filter, then you should read this blog post. Just to be clear, this blog post is not about how to bypass your school district's web filter. The following resources are all tools for saving YouTube videos to your computer. Some of these tools also work with other video sharing websites. In all cases these methods require you convert and save videos to a laptop that you use at home and school or save videos to a flash drive that you can use at school and home. 

File Conversion Tools These three tools are web-based resources that can be used to convert videos to variety of formats to download and play on your local hard drive. All three services work on the same basic process, enter the url of the video you want converted, select the file format you want to save the video in, then download the converted file. Vixy.net and Media Converter both let you download converted files directly from their website to your computer. Zamzar requires that you enter your email address and they send you the converted files. 

Download and Play Miro is an open source media player available for Mac and Windows. Miro is kind of like iTunes for user generated video websites. After you install Miro you can download videos from YouTube and other video sharing sites directly from Miro. If there is a particular video producer that you like you can subscribe to the video channel. Each video is saved in your media player until you decide to delete it.

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Classic Jazz Videos and More

Open Culture an arts and culture website that I've written about in the past has posted a list of 50 Great Arts Videos. The list was actually compiled by the Guardian and is a nice supplement to Open Culture's list of 70 Signs of Intelligent Life at YouTube. On the Guardian's list of videos visitors will find a great collection of Jazz performances as well theatrical performances. I've embedded below a video of Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.


Applications for Education
Both the Great Arts Videos and 70 Signs of Intelligent Life at YouTube are useful, free ways to find classic music and theater performances to share with fine arts students. For those you working in schools that block YouTube, I recommend installing Miro or using Zamzar to save the video locally if have a laptop to use at home.

Thursday, August 21, 2008

Another Environmental Science Resource from Google Earth

Today on the Google Earth Blog I found an interesting file that illustrates the geothermal resources of the United States. Using the Geothermal Resources layer users can zoom in and click on each state to get detailed information about the geothermal resources of each state. Click here to access the Geothermal Resources file for Google Earth. If you don't have the latest version of Google Earth installed you can grab it from the Google Earth homepage.

I also found on the Google Earth Blog links to great videos from Google.org about geothermal resources and harnessing the potential energy of geothermal resources. Watching a couple of these videos taught me somethings about geothermal resources that I didn't know. One of the videos is embedded at the end of this blog entry. Theses videos are hosted on YouTube which means that for many teachers the videos aren't accessible at school. My recommended solution to that problem is to install the open-source media player Miro. Miro makes it possible for users to download and locally save videos from YouTube. Then download the video at home or another place where YouTube is not filtered.

On the topic of geothermal energy, I also found a great interactive map about alternative energy resources in the United States. The map is available on the US Department of Energy's website. Clicking on each state on the map will reveal information about each state's alternative energy resources. Click here to see the interactive map. On the US Department of Energy's website visitors can also find information about each state's average fuel consumption.

Applications for Education
Using the Google Earth Geothermal Resources file and the US Department of Energy's alternative energy map is a great way for students to determine which alternative resources are most viable for where they live. One project that students could take on is researching alternative energy and then giving a presentation about which alternative is best. A teacher could set up the project as a mock legislative committee meeting with some students playing the role of legislators as other students present. In doing this a science teacher could work with a social studies teacher to give students the opportunity to learn about science and civics.

Here is a short video from Google.org about geothermal resources.

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Free Technology For Teachers: Tech Integrators Don't Always Get A Second Chance

I've tried hundreds of different web services and open source programs in the last year. Some of them, like Miro and Pownce, grabbed and held my attention immediately. Other web services, like Twitter, did not hold my attention at first blush but on the second time around I became a devoted user.

Unfortunately, if you're working with teachers who are reluctant to try new technologies in the classroom, you might not get a second chance to convince them to use something new. Let's say you're given four hours to show and teach new technologies to a group of reluctant teachers just getting started on the road to technology integration, is it better to show them a wide variety of options or is it better to spend more time demonstrating and teaching just a few selected options?

Thursday, February 28, 2008

Open Source Video Player- Miro

Yesterday I downloaded and used Miro for the first time, I cannot believe I waited so long to try it. Miro is simply the best open source media player I've tried out, and I've tried many. Miro is video player that host thousands of video channels aggregated from major media outlets like the AP, CBS, PBS. Miro also aggregates content from user generated video websites like YouTube and Vimeo. The best feature of Miro is that every video you play can be downloaded directly to your computer for use at a later date. The advantage of a downloaded video is that you avoid skipping or stuttering videos resulting from slow Internet connections.

Applications for Educators
The uses for video in the classroom are almost limitless. Miro's shining quality for teachers is the ability to download and save quality educational videos for free. The mainstream media channels on Miro provide thousands of videos relevant to all content areas.

Miro can be downloaded for use on Mac and Windows operating systems. The video below demonstrates the use of Miro on a Mac.


This video gives a demonstration of some of Miro's features.