Showing posts with label My Maps. Show all posts
Showing posts with label My Maps. Show all posts

Saturday, September 5, 2020

Movies on Map - Discover the World Through a Map & Video Combination

I love maps and I love a good video so I had to explore Movies on Map when I saw it featured on Maps Mania. Movies on Map is a site that features videos about interesting places all over the world.

You can search for a video according to location on Movies on Map or can simply browse the map and click on the video icons to watch a video. Your searching and browsing can be refined by location as well as by video type. The video types are hand/ ground level tours, action videos, drone/ aerial tours, dive/ underwater videos, and 360 videos.

Movies on Map is a relatively new site so there isn't a ton of good content on it, yet. It is open for registered users to add videos of their own so hopefully more content is added soon.

Applications for Education
I watched about a dozen clips on Movies on Map and didn't find anything objectionable in the videos. That said, I'm not sure how much filtering is done before videos appear on the map. For that reason I'd recommend using Movies on Map as a teacher to find videos to share with your students rather than sending students to the site to explore it on their own.

On a related note, you could have your students make their own version of Movies on Map by creating custom maps with Google's My Maps tool. This video shows you how to add videos to maps in Google's My Maps.

Friday, January 27, 2017

A Great Example of Using Google Maps in Science

At almost every conference that I attend I offer a session about Google Maps and Google Earth. Most of the people that come to those sessions are social studies teachers. That is because there is a natural connection between maps and topics in social studies. But there are plenty of other subject areas and topics in which Google Maps and Google Earth can be helpful. One example of this comes from my former colleague, John Haley.

John Haley created a blog and a corresponding Google Map called Maine Geology Hikes. On Maine Geology Hikes John writes about interesting hikes in Maine that lead you to neat geological formations. Each placemark on the map includes a description with a link back to a blog post about the hike. The blog posts are more than just stories about hiking. He shares lessons worthy of inclusion in books on the topic of Maine geology.

Applications for Education
John Haley's Maine Geology Hikes is a great example of using Google Maps in an subject area outside of social studies. The model that John provides could be modified for any state or region. Google's My Maps tool offers a couple of ways that your students can collaborate to create their own geology hikes maps.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Use Google Maps to Tell a Story Within a Story

Google's My Maps platform lets anyone who has a Google Account create their own multimedia maps. One of my favorite features within the My Maps platform is the option to create a slideshow of images and videos within a placemark. By using that feature you can tell a story within a story.

In My Maps you can create maps that contain placemarks to identify landmarks, to indicate the locations of a series of events, and to show the start and end points of journey. Within all of those placemarks you can include text descriptions, images, and videos. Students can include pictures they've taken and videos they have made. Students can also use the search tools integrated into My Maps to find images and videos to use within their placemarks.

Applications for Education
You can apply this concept of using My Maps to tell a story to a variety of subject areas. You might have students create placemarks about the locations mentioned in a favorite story. Students could map the locations and tell the story of events within a political revolution. Or you might have students map the locations of interesting geological formations then explain within those placemarks how those formations were made.

I'll be covering this idea and many others in more detail during To Geography and Beyond With Google Maps

Thursday, March 3, 2016

How to Use Google's My Maps in Your Classroom

This morning at the NCTIES 2016 conference I facilitated a short workshop on using Google Maps and Google Earth in the classroom. Both tools are so robust that it is hard to cover everything you can or could do with them in just 90 minutes. To support the workshop I have a bunch of additional resources available on this Practical Ed Tech page.

One of things that I introduced in the workshop was the idea of having students collaborate and create multiple layers on a map. Directions for doing that included in the slides embedded below.

Here are some good uses of creating maps with multiple layers.


  • Multiple layers could be used for showing data differences on a year over year or month over month basis.
  • You could display the same data with different base layers for comparison.
  • Students working collaboratively on a map can be responsible for editing their own layers on the same map.
  • If you’re using Google My Maps to have students create literature trips, they can create a different layer for each chapter of a book.
  • Students mapping the history of an event like the U.S. Civil War could create a different layer for each year of the war.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

5 Good Google Tools for Social Studies Students

This evening I gave a short webinar presentation on my five favorite Google tools for social studies teachers and students. The webinar was hosted by the New England ISTE group. The content of key elements of the webinar are outlined below. Besides what you see featured below we also looked at Google's Ngram Viewer.

1. Google Maps & Earth. In addition to zooming and panning across places in a way that a paper map could never replicate, Google Maps and Google Earth provide great tools for illustrating stories in a geographic context. The videos below demonstrate how to use Google Maps and Google Earth Tour Builder.



2. The Google News Paper Archive can be a great place for students to find old news articles about the topics they're studying in your classroom. Watch the video below to learn how to use it.



3. Google Books provides students with access to hundreds of thousands of books and periodical articles that are in the public domain. I like to create bookshelves within Google Books to help my students get started accessing some of the titles that will be useful to them.



4. Google Scholar is a research tool that is often overlooked by students. Google Scholar provides students with access to court opinions, patents, and peer-reviewed scholarly works. See the features of Google Scholar in my video embedded below.



5. Timeline JS is technically not a Google tool but it does work with Google Sheets. Timeline JS provides a template for creating and publishing multimedia timelines through a Google Spreadsheet.

Sunday, January 10, 2016

Three Thematic Mapping Tutorials

This morning on the Free Technology for Teachers Facebook page I received a question from someone seeking a thematic mapping tool that her students can use. My initial thought was to use Google's My Maps tool. Recognizing that not everyone is in love with Google products, I will also frequently suggest using National Geographic's Map Maker tool and or using Scribble Maps. Embedded below are tutorial videos for all three thematic mapping tools.

Scribble Maps provides a variety of base layer maps on which you can draw freehand, add placemarks, add image overlays, and type across the map. Scribble Maps will work in the web browser on your laptop, Chromebook, iPad, or Android tablet. In the video embedded below I provide an overview of how to use Scribble Maps.


National Geographic's Mapmaker Interactive can be a good alternative to using Google Maps in your classroom. Mapmaker Interactive offers a number of features that students and teachers can utilize without the need to enter an email address or register to use the Mapmaker tools. Those tools include measuring distances, adding placemarks, layering information, and switching between base map layers. In the video embedded below I provide an overview of the features in National Geographic's Mapmaker Interactive.


I have a three part series on using Google's My Maps tools. My favorite feature of My Maps is the option to import spreadsheet data and have it mapped for you.

Friday, October 2, 2015

How to Map Spreadsheet Data in Google My Maps

One of the overlooked and or misunderstood features of Google My Maps is the option to import spreadsheet data. Provided that your spreadsheet contains at least one column that has location information in it, you can have the data in the spreadsheet displayed as placemarks on a map. In the video embedded below I provide a demonstration of how this can be done.


Applications for Education
In the example in the video I asked people to complete a Google Form in which they shared the locations of happy events in their lives. The information collected through the Form was saved in a Google Spreadsheet that then was imported into a map. This was done to demonstrate that you could have students collaborate on the creation of data sets by having them enter data into a Google Form then map the data. You could use this method to have students create a data set about historical events, weather data recordings, or personal narratives as I did in the example in the video.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

5 Google Maps Tutorials for Teachers and Students

Yesterday, at that the third annual Practical Ed Tech Summer Camp Jim Wells spent about an hour sharing ideas for using Google Maps and Google Earth in variety of classroom settings. Google Earth offers a vastly more robust set of features than Google Maps offers. However, Google Maps is easier to access and is initially easier to understand. I have a set of Google Maps tutorial videos that I've created over the last year. Those videos are included in the playlist embedded below.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

My Maps - Create and Edit Maps in Google Drive

Last fall Google renamed their Maps Engine Lite tool to My Maps. My Maps makes it easy to create simple custom maps with up to three layers on them. For example, check out this post to see how I made a biking route map in My Maps.

Today, Google announced that My Maps is now fully integrated into Google Drive for Google Apps for Education users. This was previously the case for Gmail users who used My Maps. Google Apps administrators can enable or disable My Maps for their users. With My Maps enabled in Google Apps for Education students and teachers will be able to create, save, and edit maps from their Google Drive dashboards.
Applications for Education
As I have written in the past, there are quite a few good uses of creating maps with multiple layers.
  • Multiple layers can be used for showing data differences on a year over year or month over month basis. 
  • You can display the same data with different base layers for comparison. 
  • Students working collaboratively on a map can be responsible for editing their own layers on the same map. 
  • If you’re using My Maps to have students create literature trips (look here for inspiration), they can create a different layer for each chapter of a book. 
  • Students mapping the history of an event like the U.S. Civil War can create a different layer for each year of the war.

Friday, June 19, 2015

How to Plan Biking and Walking Routes in Google Maps

Last Friday I wrote a post about using Google's My Maps service to create biking and walking route maps. Since then I've had a few people email me with questions about the bike route mapping component. The bike route mapping tool has a route prediction feature that can drive you nuts if there are lots of roads near the route you're trying to map. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to get past that little annoyance and create bike route maps that you can save and share with friends.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Plan and Share Biking and Walking Routes on Google's My Maps

This weekend some friends and I are going on a 75 mile bike ride. In preparation for the ride I created a map on Google's My Maps and shared it with the group. My Maps makes it fairly easy to create shareable maps of biking and hiking routes.

To create a biking or walking route map on My Maps first sign into your Google account then open My Maps. After signing into My Maps select the "draw a line" tool then choose "add biking route." To draw your biking route click on a starting location on the map then drag the line along a road. My Maps tries to predict where you are going to draw your route. The prediction feature can be handy when you're trying to make short biking routes. When you're making longer routes you will have to draw over the predicted lines if you don't want to use the suggested routes.

Applications for Education
The summer is here (in the Northern Hemisphere) and it's a good time to encourage students and their parents to enjoy some healthy outdoor activities. Creating some maps of safe biking routes and walking routes then posting them on a school website could be a good way to encourage participating in outdoor activities.

Friday, April 17, 2015

How to Download KML Data from Google Maps

Last summer Google transitioned maps made with Classic Google Maps and Google Maps Engine Lite to their new My Maps platform. This morning I received an email from the Google Maps team announcing that you need to export the KML files of your original maps or lose them on June 1st when all maps will be forced into the new My Maps formatting. If you're happy with the way that the new version of your maps looks, there is nothing that you need to do. If you want to store the original KML file then you will need to export that file. I created the video embedded below to demonstrate how to export KML files from Google Maps.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

5 Ideas for Developing and Using Multiple Layer Maps in Your Classroom

As I have written in the past my favorite feature of Google's My Maps (now available to access from Google Drive) is the option to create multiple layers of placemarks in each of your custom maps. Here are five ideas for creating multiple layer maps in your classroom.
  • Multiple layers can be used for showing data differences on a year over year or month over month basis. 
  • You can display the same data with different base layers for comparison. 
  • Students working collaboratively on a map can be responsible for editing their own layers on the same map. 
  • If you’re using My Maps to have students create literature trips (look here for inspiration), they can create a different layer for each chapter of a book. 
  • Students mapping the history of an event like the U.S. Civil War can create a different layer for each year of the war.
Click here for video tutorials on My Maps. 

How to Create Custom Maps From Your Google Drive Account

 Earlier this fall Google renamed Maps Engine Lite to My Maps. My Maps is Google's service for creating custom maps. Today, My Maps was integrated into Google Drive. Now in you can create a custom map from your Google Drive account. To do this just open the "new" menu in your Google Drive account and select "My Maps." See the screenshot below for directions. Below the screenshot you will find three video tutorials on using My Maps to create custom maps.
Click image to view it in full size. 




Wednesday, September 17, 2014

How to Create Custom Maps on My Maps (Formerly Google Maps Engine Lite)

As I shared here yesterday, Google Maps Engine Lite has been renamed to simply My Maps. In the three videos embedded below I provide an overview of how to create custom maps on My Maps. In the first video I cover the basics of creating placemarks on your maps. In the second video I demonstrate how to map spreadsheet data. The third video covers embedding maps, printing maps, and adding drawings to your maps.



Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Google Maps Engine Lite Renamed "My Maps"

Google Maps Engine Lite, a great tool for creating custom online maps, has been renamed to simply My Maps (not to be confused with "My Maps" that used to be in the old version of Google Maps). My Maps includes all of the features of Google Maps Engine Lite. My favorite of those features is the option to create multiple layers of placemarks in each of your custom maps.


Ideas for using My Maps in your classroom:
As I have written in the past, there are quite a few good uses of creating maps with multiple layers.
  • Multiple layers can be used for showing data differences on a year over year or month over month basis. 
  • You can display the same data with different base layers for comparison. 
  • Students working collaboratively on a map can be responsible for editing their own layers on the same map. 
  • If you’re using Google Maps Engine Lite My Maps to have students create literature trips (look here for inspiration), they can create a different layer for each chapter of a book. 
  • Students mapping the history of an event like the U.S. Civil War can create a different layer for each year of the war.
I will create an updated tutorial on My Maps soon, but in the meantime the following tutorial on Google Maps Engine Lite offers nearly everything you need to know to use the new My Maps.