Showing posts with label Oil Spill. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Oil Spill. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Gulf of Mexico One Year Later

Today is the one year anniversary of the start of the Gulf of Mexico BP Oil Spill. One year later the Gulf of Mexico is still recovering. Here are a few resources for learning about the state of the Gulf of Mexico one year after the spill.

CNN Student News leads off today with a segment about the oil spill and the clean up efforts that are still in place.



The New York Times has a four minute video chronicling the efforts of scientists to determine the long-term ecological effects of the oil spill.

The most visually impressive resource about the oil spill is the Atlantic's 39 image photo essay The Gulf Oil Disaster: One Year Later.

On a related note, the Sierra Club film The Day the Water Died, although a bit dated, chronicles the impact of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on the people of Alaska.

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Interactive - Gulf of Mexico Layers of Life

The cover story on this month's issue of National Geographic is about the ecological and economic impact of the Deep Water Horizon oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico. As a supplement to the main article, National Geographic has an interactive illustration of the layers of marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. Click on one of the four layers in the illustration to see the animals affected by the oil spill.

In addition to the interactive illustration, National Geographic has maps of the areas affected by the oil spill and photo galleries related to the oil spill. Finally, for comparison purposes you can also find articles and photo galleries from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. All of those resources can be found in the NGM Gulf Spill Hub.

Applications for Education
NGM's interactive illustration could be a way for students to get a quick overview of the ecological impact of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The NGM Gulf Spill Hub's inclusion of Exxon Valdez oil spill articles gives teachers a resource they can use for lessons comparing the impacts of the two spills.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
The Day the Water Died - Examining the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
Where Does Oil Come From?

Thursday, July 8, 2010

CNN Student News Summer Special

CNN Student News has been on hiatus since early June, but they have released a special summer episode. The summer episode updates viewers on the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill, the World Cup, and the change in command of US Generals in Afghanistan.

Friday, June 11, 2010

Video - Oil Spill by the Numbers

The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill has been spewing oil into the Gulf of Mexico for more 50 days now. Time has produced a video documenting the events of the oil spill and the quantity of oil now in the Gulf of Mexico. The Oil Spill by the Numbers is embedded below.



H/T to Jeffery Hill's The English Blog.

Applications for Education
This video could be useful for showing students the breadth of the impact of the oil spill. After watching the video you could have students develop their own timelines related to the oil spill.

Monday, June 7, 2010

Fast Draw - Putting the Oil Spill in Perspective

Yesterday, on the CBS Sunday Morning Show the Fast Draw team illustrated the size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill relative to daily energy consumption in the United States. The video compares not only how much oil is used in the US everyday, but also the amount of coal and hydro power consumed in the US. Watch the video below.


Watch CBS News Videos Online

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
More Google Maps About Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill
Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Maps

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

If It Was My Home - Oil Spill Visualization

If It Was My Home is a simple site that allows you to quickly compare the current size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to your city, county, state, or country. If It Was My Home is very similar to the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Map created by Paul Rademacher that I wrote about in early May. The difference between the two is Rademacher's map uses the Google Earth Browser Plugin while If It Was My Home uses the standard Google Maps interface. Below is an image of a map comparing the current size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to the size of South Paris, Maine where I work.














Applications for Education
If It Was My Home relies on the Google Maps interface instead of the Google Earth Browser Plugin which means If It Was My Home doesn't require anything other than a standard web browser to access the service. This difference is significant if you work in a school that doesn't allow you to install anything on the school's computers.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
More Google Maps About Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill
Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Maps

Monday, May 24, 2010

Bottom of the Ocean to the Top of the World

Today's episode of CNN Student News takes viewers from the bottom of the ocean to the top of the world. In today's episode students can view simulations of three methods for dealing with the oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico. CNN has also included an some CGI animations of how BP is trying to stop the spill. Then on a lighter note students can hear from 13 year old Jordan Romero who just became the youngest person to summit Mount Everest.

Monday, May 10, 2010

Compare Oil Spill's Size to Your Town's Size

Thanks to Jason Flom I've just learned about a Google Earth-based resource that allows you to compare the current size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill with the size of major cities and or your hometown. The Gulf Coast Oil Spill Map was developed by Google engineer Paul Rademacher. The map uses the Google Earth Browser Plugin to enable users to compare the size of the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico with the size of their cities or towns.

Applications for Education
The Gulf Coast Oil Spill Map is a great visual tool that puts the size of the oil slick into a perspective that students can understand. When I used it, saw that the oil slick is about the same size as the county I live in.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
More Google Maps About Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill
Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Maps

Friday, May 7, 2010

First-hand Accounts of Oil Spill's Impact

The Louisiana Bucket Brigade is an organization that has started to collect first-hand reports of the impact of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The reports are submitted by visitors to the site, verified (it's not clear how the verification process works), and geolocated on an interactive map. Click on any placemark on the map to read a report. In some cases images are included in the report.

H/T to Mashable for the info about the Louisiana Bucket Brigade.

Applications for Education
Twice this week I posted maps related to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. What makes the map created by the Louisiana Bucket Brigade different from other maps is that it contains stories from people directly affected by the oil spill. Some of stories have a distinctly personal tone from people who are angry and or frustrated about the impact of the oil spill on their livelihoods.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

More Google Maps About Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

Yesterday, I shared links to a couple of map resources about the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill. One of those links was for a Google Earth file. This morning I learned through the Google Earth Blog that Google has created a page just for sharing maps, files, links, and videos about oil spill. On Google Crisis Response you will find more than a dozen Google Maps and Google Earth layers displaying information related to the oil spill. These files contain information about the size of the oil spill, fishing closures in the Gulf of Mexico, and points of interest affected by the oil spill.

On Google Crisis Response you can upload and view videos about the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill. Embedded below is one of the videos from the collection on Google Crisis Response.


Applications for Education
As I mentioned yesterday, Google Maps and Google Earth files about the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill could be good complements to articles your students might read about the story. The Google Crisis Response page isn't quite a one-stop shopping experience for information about the oil spill, but it is a very good starting place.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Maps

Since the Deep Water Horizon oil spill started on April 20, as many as 210,000 gallons of oil per day has polluted the Gulf of Mexico. The New York Times has an interactive map tracking the spread of the oil by day. Click play on the map to watch the oil spread.











Google has also added imagery to Google Earth with which you can view the expanse of the oil on the water. You can access that Google Earth file here. Turn on the "explore the oceans" layer built into Google Earth to learn about the environmental features potentially affected by the oil spill.















Larry Ferlazzo has created an extensive list of links about the Gulf Oil Spill. Check out Larry's list for more resources accessible to students.

Applications for Education
These maps could be a good complement to news articles your students read or new videos your students watch about the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The maps provide nice visual aids that will help students realize how massive this oil spill is.

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Gulf Oil Spill Overview - CNN Student News

Today's episode of CNN Student News leads off with a segment about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The segment contains some aerial footage as well as map footage of the areas affected and potentially affected if the oil slick continues to expand. As always CNN has furnished printable maps and discussion guides to accompany your classroom use of CNN Student News.


Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
The Day the Water Died - Examining the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
Where Does Oil Come From?
Understanding the Water Cycle

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The Day the Water Died

Today is the 20th anniversary of Exxon Valdez oil spill. A few years ago the Sierra Club produced a film about the short and long term effects of the oil spill. The film is called The Day the Water Died. I have embedded the YouTube version of the video below.


Applications for Education
While there is an obvious bias to the film, it still does a very good job of exploring the environmental and economic effects of the oil spill.

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