Showing posts with label Oil. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Oil. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

The User's Guide to Energy Explains Energy Production and Consumption

The User's Guide to Energy is a series of six animated videos produced by The Atlantic. The videos cover the basics of getting energy produced from natural gas, oil, and solar to market, how much energy American's consume, and climate change connected to energy consumption. Two of the videos are embedded below.




Wednesday, March 20, 2013

National Geographic Explains Fracking

Last fall I drove across North Dakota and I'm going back next month to deliver a keynote for NDATL's annual conference. Because North Dakota is on my mind National Geographic grabbed my attention with a headline this month about shale oil and fracking in North Dakota. Even though it is a bit robotic, the National Geographic video below does a good job of illustrating the process without putting too much bias into the explanation.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Gulf of Mexico One Year Later

Today is the one year anniversary of the start of the Gulf of Mexico BP Oil Spill. One year later the Gulf of Mexico is still recovering. Here are a few resources for learning about the state of the Gulf of Mexico one year after the spill.

CNN Student News leads off today with a segment about the oil spill and the clean up efforts that are still in place.



The New York Times has a four minute video chronicling the efforts of scientists to determine the long-term ecological effects of the oil spill.

The most visually impressive resource about the oil spill is the Atlantic's 39 image photo essay The Gulf Oil Disaster: One Year Later.

On a related note, the Sierra Club film The Day the Water Died, although a bit dated, chronicles the impact of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on the people of Alaska.

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Interactive - Gulf of Mexico Layers of Life

The cover story on this month's issue of National Geographic is about the ecological and economic impact of the Deep Water Horizon oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico. As a supplement to the main article, National Geographic has an interactive illustration of the layers of marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. Click on one of the four layers in the illustration to see the animals affected by the oil spill.

In addition to the interactive illustration, National Geographic has maps of the areas affected by the oil spill and photo galleries related to the oil spill. Finally, for comparison purposes you can also find articles and photo galleries from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. All of those resources can be found in the NGM Gulf Spill Hub.

Applications for Education
NGM's interactive illustration could be a way for students to get a quick overview of the ecological impact of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The NGM Gulf Spill Hub's inclusion of Exxon Valdez oil spill articles gives teachers a resource they can use for lessons comparing the impacts of the two spills.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
The Day the Water Died - Examining the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
Where Does Oil Come From?

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

If It Was My Home - Oil Spill Visualization

If It Was My Home is a simple site that allows you to quickly compare the current size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to your city, county, state, or country. If It Was My Home is very similar to the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Map created by Paul Rademacher that I wrote about in early May. The difference between the two is Rademacher's map uses the Google Earth Browser Plugin while If It Was My Home uses the standard Google Maps interface. Below is an image of a map comparing the current size of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to the size of South Paris, Maine where I work.














Applications for Education
If It Was My Home relies on the Google Maps interface instead of the Google Earth Browser Plugin which means If It Was My Home doesn't require anything other than a standard web browser to access the service. This difference is significant if you work in a school that doesn't allow you to install anything on the school's computers.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
First-hand Accounts of the Oil Spill's Impact
More Google Maps About Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill
Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Maps

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Gulf Oil Spill Overview - CNN Student News

Today's episode of CNN Student News leads off with a segment about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The segment contains some aerial footage as well as map footage of the areas affected and potentially affected if the oil slick continues to expand. As always CNN has furnished printable maps and discussion guides to accompany your classroom use of CNN Student News.


Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
The Day the Water Died - Examining the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
Where Does Oil Come From?
Understanding the Water Cycle

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The Day the Water Died

Today is the 20th anniversary of Exxon Valdez oil spill. A few years ago the Sierra Club produced a film about the short and long term effects of the oil spill. The film is called The Day the Water Died. I have embedded the YouTube version of the video below.


Applications for Education
While there is an obvious bias to the film, it still does a very good job of exploring the environmental and economic effects of the oil spill.

Save 20% on all books & DVDs from National Geographic!

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Where Does Oil Come From?

Earlier today the Google LatLong blog posted a link to a map and timeline created by the Rocky Mountain Institute to demonstrate the source of the oil the United States has used since 1973. The map and timeline work together to show the fluctuations in volume imported and prices since 1973. You can see the map and timeline in action on the RMI website.























A lighter resource for introducing your students to a study of oil production and consumption can be found on How Stuff Works. How Stuff Works has a number of videos related to oil production and consumption including this one from the hit series Dirty Jobs.