Showing posts with label Photos for Class. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Photos for Class. Show all posts

Friday, March 16, 2018

How to Add an Image Search Box to Google Sites

Late last year Google started to allow you to embed content and widgets from third parties into your Google Sites. One of the things that you might consider adding to your classroom or library Google Site is the Photos for Class image search tool. Adding that search tool to your site will make it easy for your students to quickly find Creative Commons licensed and public domain images to use in their projects. Watch my new video to see how you can embed the Photos for Class search tool into your Google Site.


Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that owns Storyboard That which is an advertiser on this blog. 

Friday, March 9, 2018

Photos for Class Now Offers More Free Images for Students

Photos for Class is one of my favorite sites for students to use to find free images to use their projects. The most outstanding feature of Photos for Class is that it automatically adds attribution information to the footer of the images that students download. For the last few years Photos for Class has relied on Flickr's library of Creative Commons and public domain images. Recently, Photos for Class started to include public domain images from Pixabay's safe search. In the following video I demonstrate how you can use Photos for Class to find and download free images.


Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that owns Storyboard That and advertises on this blog. 

Saturday, December 16, 2017

5 Good Alternatives to Google Image Search

Google Images tends to be the default image search tool of students and adults who haven't been introduced to better options. Google Images is convenient, but it's not the best place for students to find images that are in the public domain or images that have been labeled with a Creative Commons license. Here are five better options.

Unsplash offers a huge library of images that are either in the public domain or have a Creative Common license. If you or your students are using Google Slides, the Unsplash add-on for Google Slides makes it easy to quickly take images from Unsplash and add them to your slides. Watch my video embedded below to see how the Unsplash add-on for Google Slides works. 



Pixabay is usually my go-to place to find and download quality public domain images. You can search on Pixabay by using keywords or you can simply browse through the library of images. When you find an image you can download it in the size that suits your needs. Registered users do not have to enter a captcha code to download images. Users who do not register can download images, but they do have to enter a captcha code before downloading each picture. There is a safe search mode in Pixabay that you should use in classroom settings.



Flickr's The Commons hosts images from libraries and museums around the world. You can search The Commons by topic or by searching for a specific type of image.




PikWizard is a free site that offers thousands of high quality images that you can download and re-use for free. PikWizard provides clear guidance on how you can use each picture that you find on the site. You will find that guidance posted to the right of any picture that you select from search results. PikWizard also provides clear directions on how to give credit to the photographers whose pictures you use.

Photos for Class is a free site that helps students find Creative Commons licensed images. The images that they download from Photos for Class come with attribution information embedded into the footer of the image. In the short video below I demonstrate how easy it is to find pictures through Photos for Class.


You can put the the Photos for Class search engine in your own blog or website. The video embedded below offers a demonstration of that process.


Bonus item!
Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Commons can be good places to find images that are in the public domain as well as images that have Creative Common licenses. I haven't found a great way to search for images on Wikipedia and Wikimedia so I just enter a search for a topic, person, or place and then scroll through the page to look for an image. It's not the most efficient process, but it works for me. Just make sure that you check the licensing statement on the image before you re-use it.

Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by Storyboard That. Storyboard That is an advertiser on this blog. 

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

How to Include an Image Search Engine in Your Classroom Website

On Sunday afternoon at the CSLA 2017 conference (a great event, by the way) I facilitated a workshop about conducting video projects with students. One of the things that we talked about was making sure that students use copyright-friendly pictures and audio when they are creating their videos. To that end, I demonstrated how to use Photos for Class.

Photos for Class is an image search engine that only locates images that are labeled with a Creative Commons license. When students download images from Photos for Class the images include the attribution that they need to include when they re-use the image. This week Photos for Class published a couple of widgets that you can embed into your blog. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to add the Photos for Class image search widget to your blog.



Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that owns StoryBoard That, an advertiser on this blog. 

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

The Three Most Common Searches on Free Technology for Teachers

Every month I take a look at the most popular posts of the month. At the same time I look at the search terms that visitors enter most often on Free Technology for Teachers. This month the three most frequently searched terms were "random name selector," "kahoot," and "photos for class." Below I have assembled some resources about each of those terms.

Random name selector:
On Russel Tarr's Classtools.net you can find lots of great tools for your classroom. The Random Name Picker and the Fruit Machine are two of those tools that can be used in almost every classroom setting. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to use both of those tools.


Flippity has a template for creating a random name picker in Google Sheets. You can learn how to use that template in the video that you see embedded below.



Kahoot:
In April Kahoot released a new team mode. The team mode is designed to be used with students who are sharing computers, tablets, or phones. In team mode students arrange themselves in teams around a shared computer or tablet. When you start a Kahoot game you'll now choose "team mode." With team mode selected your students will be prompted to enter a team name and a list of the team members. After the teams have entered their names you will be ready to start the game. One of the nice features of team mode is that students have time to discuss their answer choices before they are allowed to submit a response. From there the game is played and scored as any other Kahoot game is scored.

Kahoot's ghost mode essentially gives students the opportunity to play a Kahoot review game against themselves. In ghost mode students measure their progress against themselves. First, run a Kahoot game as you normally would. At the end of the game select "ghost mode" to run the game again. In ghost mode students play against their own scores from the previous game. Then when you run the game students will be competing against the "ghost" version of themselves from the previous running of the game. For example, I play a game as a student in the first running of a game then in the second running of the game I'll be competing against my previous score as well as those of my classmates.

One of the features of Kahoot that I frequently demonstrate in my workshops is the option to duplicate and edit quizzes that teachers have contributed to the public Kahoot quiz gallery. Duplicating and editing existing quizzes can save you a lot of time when you need to find a quick review activity for your students. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to find, duplicate, and edit quizzes in Kahoot's public quiz gallery.



Photos for Class:
Photos for Class is a free site that helps students find Creative Commons licensed images. The images that they download from Photos for Class come with attribution information embedded into the footer of the image. In the short video below I demonstrate how easy it is to find pictures through Photos for Class.


You can put the the Photos for Class search engine in your own blog or website. The video embedded below offers a demonstration of that process.


Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that runs Storyboard That, an advertiser on this blog. 

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Photos for Class + Canva = Fun Animal Stories

Photos for Class is a great tool for locating Creative Commons licensed images that your students can use in all kinds of projects. The great thing about Photos for Class is that when students download an image from the site all of the attribution information that they need is included in the image's footer.

This afternoon I saw a neat example of using Photos for Class to create a simple meme or one-image story. The example was on the Storyboard That Facebook page (Storyboard That owns Photos for Class). In the example they had an image of a polar bear and a fun fact about polar bears.

When I saw the sample this afternoon I immediately recognized how easy and fun it could be for students to create their own animal stories through a combination of Photos for Class and Canva. You could have students search for a picture of an animal on Photos for Class then upload it to Canva where they could put it into any of the Canva templates to create a small poster or online graphic. Students could then add some fun facts in the form of text written over the image. See my example below.

The Photos for Class search tool can be added to your classroom, library, or school website. A video on that process is available here.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

How to Find Public Domain and Creative Commons Images

In last week's survey of Free Technology for Teachers readers Flickr The Commons, Photos for Class, and Pixabay were chosen as the best places to find public domain and Creative Commons images. All three can be used to find images that can be re-used in a variety of presentation formats. The videos embedded below provide an overview of how to use each image source.

Pixabay hosts high quality public domain images. You can search on Pixabay by using keywords or you can simply browse through the library of images. When you find a Pixabay image you can download it in the size that suits your needs. Registered users do not have to enter a captcha code to download images. Users who do not register can download images, but they do have to enter a captcha code before downloading each picture.



Photos for Class is a free site that helps students find Creative Commons licensed images. The images that they download from Photos for Class come with attribution information embedded into the footer of the image. In the short video below I demonstrate how easy it is to find pictures through Photos for Class.


You can put the the Photos for Class search engine in your own blog or website. The video embedded below offers a demonstration of that process.



Flickr The Commons hosts images from libraries and museums around the world. You can search The Commons by topic or by searching for a specific type of image.



Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that runs Storyboard That, an advertiser on this blog. 

Friday, December 18, 2015

The Best of Free Technology for Teachers - Survey Results

Last week I posted a Google Form in which I asked readers of Free Technology for Teachers to vote for their favorite ed tech tools. At midnight last night I closed the survey and Google Forms compiled the results for me. Below are the tools that were the most popular in each category.

Video creation: 
iMovie for iPad (free with new iPads) won by a slight margin over Animoto and WeVideo.

Audio creation/ editing:
SoundCloud came out on top. That one surprised me a bit. It is also interesting to note that this is the category that received the fewest overall votes.

Creative Commons/ Public Domain Image Sources:
Flickr - The Commons took 26% of the votes while Photos for Class and Pixabay took 20% and 18% of the votes respectively.

Digital Portfolios:
Google Sites took this category in a landslide with 37% of the votes. The closest competitors were SeeSaw and Weebly which had a combined 36% of the votes.

Blog/ Website platform:
Blogger took this category with Google Sites and Weebly not too far behind.

Quiz / Formative Assessment Tools:
It wasn't much of a surprise to me that Kahoot was the top vote getter in this category. Everywhere I go people rave about how much they love Kahoot.

Teacher-Parent-Student Communication Apps:
Remind had nearly 50% of the votes and crushed the competition in this category.

Other/ Write-ins:
This was a space for folks to suggest tools that might not have fit in another category. In this section HSTRY was written more than any other tool. The comments in the form spoke to the versatility of HSTRY as folks wrote about using it as an assessment tool, a portfolio tool, and as a timeline tool.

The complete spreadsheet of results is available here.

Thursday, September 3, 2015

A Quick Way to Find Creative Commons Licensed Images

When students need images to use slideshows, videos, or other multimedia projects I always recommend that they first try to use images that they have created themselves. If that isn't possible I'll ask them to look for images that are in the public domain. Then as a third choice I'll ask them to use Creative Commons licensed images.

Photos for Class is a free site that helps students find Creative Commons licensed images. The images that they download from Photos for Class come with attribution information embedded into the footer of the image. In the short video below I demonstrate how easy it is to find pictures through Photos for Class.


You can put the the Photos for Class search engine in your own blog or website. The video embedded below offers a demonstration of that process.


Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by the same company that runs Storyboard That, an advertiser on this blog. 

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Mailbag - Answers to Questions from Readers

Every week I receive quite a few emails and Facebook messages from teachers looking for recommendations for sites and apps that solve a problem for them or their students. The questions that have broad appeal I like to include in my weekly-ish mailbag post. This week's questions and answers are posted below.

Q1. Long time follower, first time corresponder. I have you to thank for making the transition to Google Drive easier after I participated in one of your small group webinars a few years back. I am a big fan of Creative Commons and shortcuts. Do you know of any tools out there that would automatically include the Creative Commons license on the image?

Photosforclass.com is a Creative Commons image search tool that will include all of the attribution information in the bottom of the image when you download an image. A video tutorial on embedding Photosforclass.com into a blog can be seen here. (Disclosure: Photosforclass.com is owned by StoryboardThat.com which advertises on my blog).

Another option is Alan Levine's Flickr CC Attribution helper. I have a video tutorial about that tool available here.

Finally, if your students are only using the images in presentations, Haiku Deck has an integrated CC image search. The attribution comes attached to the pictures found through the iPad and web versions of Haiku Deck. Click here for a video tutorial on Haiku Deck's web app.

Q2. Thank you so much for responding so promptly to my e-mail. All of your comments are quite helpful. If you have time to reply again, I have a follow-up question: How does one submit and upload a Garage Band recording to any of the sites you suggest? I could not get the recording to upload out of DropBox. The file isn't supported in GoogleDrive. Additionally, it will not upload into SoundCloud, AudioBoom, etc. I am not sure what I am missing.

I put together some screenshots that explain how to move a file from GarageBand to SoundCloud (the process is the same for other file hosts too). http://ipadapps4school.com/2015/04/02/how-to-move-a-garageband-recording-to-soundcloud/

Q3. Our students are about to begin a project creating videos through still images and perhaps some recorded video chunks on their phones. I would like to have them be able to do voice overs, but am unsure of a good web based video editor that I can use that 9th graders can navigate and store their information. Do you have any suggestions for me?


WeVideo is a good option. Your students can upload and store images in their accounts. Students would then drag-and-drop images into a timeline record a voice-over while looking at the images. WeVideo can also integrate into a Google Drive account.

If you have a question you can email me or message me through the FreeTech4Teachers Facebook page. I try to reply to every email.

Monday, February 16, 2015

How to Add a Creative Commons Image Search Tool to Your Blog

Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by Storyboard That. Storyboard That advertises on this blog.

Photos for Class is an image search engine that only locates images that are labeled with a Creative Commons license. When students download images from Photos for Class the images include the attribution that they need to include when they re-use the image. This week Photos for Class published a couple of widgets that you can embed into your blog. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to add the Photos for Class image search widget to your blog.


The video above is the 66th that I've created and added to my Practical Ed Tech Tips playlist.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

How to Find Creative Commons Images Within Edmodo

As I shared last week, Photos for Class is now available as an Edmodo app. With Photos for Class installed in your Edmodo group your students can search for Creative Commons licensed images and download them with citations attached to them. In the video embedded below I provide a demonstration of how to install Photos for Class. The second half of the video demonstrates a students' perspective of using Photos for Class within Edmodo.


Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by Storyboard That. Storyboard That is an advertiser on FreeTech4Teachers.com

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Find and Cite Creative Commons Images in Edmodo

Photos for Class is a free Creative Commons image search engine that was launched in late November. The service is designed to help students find and accurately cite images. Images downloaded through Photos for Class have proper attributions automatically added to them. This service is now available in Edmodo too.

Photos for Class can be found in the Edmodo app store. The app is free. You can install Photos for Class Edmodo app with just a couple of clicks. Once installed all of your students can start searching for and downloading Creative Commons licensed images.

Applications for Education
I always advocate for students to use their own pictures or public domain pictures in their projects. For those times when appropriate public domain images cannot be found and taking their own pictures isn't practical, a search for Creative Commons-licensed images through a tool like Photos for Class is a good tool for students to use.

Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by Storyboard That. Storyboard That is an advertiser on FreeTech4Teachers.com

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Photos for Class - Quickly Find and Cite Creative Commons Images

Photos for Class is a new service designed to help students and teachers find and cite Creative Commons-licensed images. The site utilizes Flickr's API to find images that match your search terms. When you find an image that you want to use, click the download link just below the image. The downloaded image will have the attribution information added to it. See the screenshot below for an example.

Applications for Education
I always advocate for students to use their own pictures or public domain pictures in their projects. That said, it's not always possible to take a picture or find a public domain picture that is appropriate for a project. In those cases, a search for Creative Commons-licensed images through a tool like Photos for Class is a good tool for students to use.

Disclosure: Photos for Class is owned by Storyboard That. Storyboard That is an advertiser on FreeTech4Teachers.com