Showing posts with label Physical Education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Physical Education. Show all posts

Thursday, August 25, 2016

5 Tools to Help Keep Your Students and Yourself Active & Healthy

The new school year always feels like a new calendar year to me as many students and teachers have "resolutions" for the new school year. If one of your resolutions for the new school year is to keep yourself or your students active and healthy, the following free resources are for you.

GoNoodle is a free service that is designed to promote physical fitness in a fun environment. GoNoodle features tons of free videos that lead students in short, 2-5 minutes, exercises. These are fun exercises like dancing that can be done in your classroom or at home with parents. GoNoodle provides an online environment in which students track the minutes that they spend exercising. Students choose avatars to represent themselves in the GoNoodle environment. New avatars are available once a student completes enough activity time to reach a new level.

Sworkit Kids is a similar app (Android versioniOS version) that will also help you get your students moving for short exercise breaks. Sworkit Kids doesn't have animated videos like GoNoodle does. Sworkit Kids simply features short video demonstrations of a movement like diagonal hopping accompanied by a countdown timer.

One of the simple improvements that I made to my diet a couple of years ago was cutting out sugar from my morning coffee (I never used cream). The CDC's Rethink Your Drink helped me understand how many extra calories I was taking in through sugar. Rethink Your Drink provides a chart of sugar content and calories found in popular beverages. The PDF also contains a chart of suggested alternatives to drinking sugary beverages. In addition to the charts Rethink Your Drink provides suggestions on ways to cut sugar calories safely while not sacrificing nutrients.

Space Chef is a free iPad app from the Lawrence Hall of Science. The purpose of the app is to introduce students to healthy foods and recipes that they may not have ever tried or even heard about. Space Chef features a fast-paced game in which students have to quickly grab the ingredients for a recipe. The ingredients scroll past them in three streams or flight paths. Students are shown a recipe at the top of the screen and they must grab the appropriate ingredients as they stream across the screen.

Arthur Family Health is a free resource from PBS Kids. Arthur Family Health is designed to help parents, teachers, and students learn about common health challenges children face. Through videos, games (online and offline), and data sheets visitors to Arthur Family Health can learn about asthma, allergies, nutrition, fitness, and resilience (dealing with tragedies).

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Keep Kids Active With GoNoodle or Sworkit Kids

GoNoodle is a free service that is designed to promote physical fitness in a fun environment. GoNoodle features tons of free videos that lead students in short, 2-5 minutes, exercises. These are fun exercises like dancing that can be done in your classroom or at home with parents. GoNoodle provides an online environment in which students track the minutes that they spend exercising. Students choose avatars to represent themselves in the GoNoodle environment. New avatars are available once a student completes enough activity time to reach a new level. Learn more about GoNoodle in the videos below.


Sworkit Kids is a similar app (Android version, iOS version) that will also help you get your students moving for short exercise breaks. Sworkit Kids doesn't have animated videos like GoNoodle does. Sworkit Kids simply features short video demonstrations of a movement like diagonal hopping accompanied by a countdown timer.

Applications for Education
As the new school year gets underway you may find yourself looking for new exercise and "brain break" activities that you can do right in your classroom. If that's the case for you, GoNoodle or Sworkit Kids could be the tool for you.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Sugar Scanner Shows You How Much Sugar You're Consuming

Over the years I've shared a bunch of resources addressing the topic of sugar consumption. Some of those resources include a video about why we crave sugar, how sugar affects the human body, and how much sugar is present in commonly consumed beverages. Last night the developer of another resource on the topic of sugar consumption sent me an email about his site called Sugar Scanner.

Sugar Scanner provides visitors with an index of popular foods and beverages. Visitors can select junk food, fruits, vegetables, beverages from the index. Once a selection is made visitors see an image of the food or beverage next to a stack of sugar cubes.

Applications for Education
Sugar Scanner could be a good resource for health and physical education teachers who are trying to encourage students to make better snack food choices. The visuals on Sugar Scanner make it easy for students to understand how much sugar they're consuming.

Sugar Scanner also has a small collection of videos about sugar consumption.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

How to Create a Biking or Walking Route Map in Google Maps

On Saturday morning I rode in a charity bike ride in my community. That ride was well mapped and planned thanks in part to Google Maps. If you want to create a biking route map or walking route map, follow the steps that I outline in the video embedded below.


Applications for Education
Warm weather is finally here (in the Northern Hemisphere) and it's a good time to encourage students and their parents to enjoy some healthy outdoor activities. Creating some maps of safe biking routes and walking routes then posting them on a school website could be a good way to encourage participating in outdoor activities.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

MoveIt - A Chrome Extension to Keep You Active

MoveIt is a free Chrome extension that aims to help you avoid sitting in front of your computer for too long. At intervals of your choosing MoveIt will prompt you to get up and complete a short exercise. You can set the intervals to be as frequent as every five minutes or as infrequent as every hour. You can also disable MoveIt altogether for the times when you absolutely cannot be interrupted. An overview of MoveIt is included in the video below.


Sworkit Kids is a free Android and iOS app that also offers prompts for short physical exercises your students can do in your classroom.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

10 Apps, Sites, and Lessons for Promoting Health and Fitness

In all of my Best of the Web presentations I try to present resources for a wide variety of classroom settings and subject areas. Health and physical education resources are always included because of my personal interest in the field as well as its importance in giving students lifelong skills. Here are ten of my favorite resources for teaching and promoting health and fitness in schools.

One of the simple improvements that I made to my diet last year was cutting out sugar from my morning coffee (I never used cream). The CDC's Rethink Your Drink helped me understand how many extra calories I was taking in through sugar. Rethink Your Drink provides a chart of sugar content and calories found in popular beverages. The PDF also contains a chart of suggested alternatives to drinking sugary beverages. In addition to the charts Rethink Your Drink provides suggestions on ways to cut sugar calories safely while not sacrificing nutrients.

How Sugar Affects the Brain is a TED-Ed lesson through which students learn why sugary foods and beverages can become addictive and how the human body processes sugar. The video is embedded below.


Untamed Science offers a similar video lesson in which we learn why so many of us crave sugar and sweet things. The video is embedded below.



Sugar Stacks is a good website for understanding how much sugar is in the food and beverages that we consume. Sugar Stacks lists popular food and beverage items in ten categories. Every item is pictured with a stack of sugar cubes. Each sugar cube represents four grams of sugar. This is a great way to see just how much sugar you really consume in your favorite snack or beverage.

Chew or Die is a free iPad, iPhone, and Android app that encourages people to try new healthy foods. The free app contains a series of healthy food challenges. The challenges include things like removing bread and potato-based starches with rice, trying a new vegetable, removing meat from your diet for a week, and sneaking more fiber into your diet. When you try a challenge take a picture of the food that you try and upload it to Chew or Die to challenge your friends to match your healthy choice. Click here for the iOS version. Click here for the Android version.

Sworkit Kids a free iOS and Android app designed to get kids moving with short, fun exercises. The app features workouts of five to thirty minutes in length (you pick the length). Each workout has a mix of fun exercises like diagonal hopping, crab walking, and hopping on one foot. You can choose exercises or let the app create a sequence of exercises for you.

Space Chef is a free iPad app from the Lawrence Hall of Science. The purpose of the app is to introduce students to healthy foods and recipes that they may not have ever tried or even heard about. Space Chef features a fast-paced game in which students have to quickly grab the ingredients for a recipe. The ingredients scroll past them in three streams or flight paths. Students are shown a recipe at the top of the screen and they must grab the appropriate ingredients as they stream across the screen.

Monster Heart Medic is another free iOS and Android app from the Lawrence Hall of Science. The app is designed to help students in elementary and middle school understand how the cardiovascular system is affected by diet and exercise. The app features a character named Ragnar that students must diagnose then help develop a plan to live a healthier life. Sabba Quidwai wrote an extensive review of the app here.  

Arthur Family Health is a free resource from PBS Kids. Arthur Family Health is designed to help parents, teachers, and students learn about common health challenges children face. Through videos, games (online and offline), and data sheets visitors to Arthur Family Health can learn about asthma, allergies, nutrition, fitness, and resilience (dealing with tragedies).

Walking, running, and biking are three simple ways to get regular exercise. I live in a rural area that doesn't have many sidewalks or even wide shoulders on the road so it can be hard to find safe places for those activities. If you live in a similar area, you might also hear the same complaint from students and parents. To help them find safe routes you could create walking, running, and biking routes in Google Maps. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to do that.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Lots of Lessons About Winter Weather

Conditions at my house on Tuesday.
A large winter storm is in the forecast for later this week in the northeastern United States. If you like snow, this is a great forecast for you. If you hate snow, the snow is still coming. I subscribe to the philosophy that you should make the most out of every season. That's why I love living in New England. One of the ways that we can make the most out of every season is to teach lessons related to each season of the year.

Scholastic has a large set of lesson plans and online activities for teaching about winter weather, winter sports, and winter traditions. Within Winter: Everything You Need you will find lesson plans on weather forecasting,  lessons on how animals adapt to winter, and ideas for teaching math through winter weather connections.

My favorite winter weather lesson resource from Scholastic is the Interactive Weather Maker. Using the Interactive Weather Maker students adjust temperatures and humidity levels to create rain and snow storms. Students simply move the temperature and humidity sliders until rain or snow begins to show up in the scene on their screens.

How windchill is calculated:
The windchill was -20F last night at my house. The following video explains how windchill is calculated. The video comes from Presh Talwalkar.



The psychology of extreme weather:
Television news reporters like to use the word "extreme" whenever we have a lot of rain or snow in a short amount of time. Is the weather really "extreme" or is that just our impression of it? The following Minute Earth video takes on the topic of how extreme weather affects our thinking about weather patterns in general. I found the video to be interesting from a psychology perspective. The video is embedded below.




How snowflakes are created:
The following episode of Bytesize Science embedded below explains how snowflakes are created.


Why the moon appears brighter in winter:
In the winter when we have fresh snow combined with a full moon I don't have to wear a headlamp to see my dogs in the yard at night. In the following Minute Physics video we learn why the full moon appears brighter in the winter.



Fun things to do in the snow:
NOVA, as part of their program on Denali, has directions for building a snow cave and directions for building an Igloo. (If you do either of these activities, make sure that you closely supervise students. A collapsed snow cave or Igloo can be very dangerous).

Boys' Life offers a list of outdoor winter games as well as directions for building igloos and snow shelters.

Making your own snowshoes is an activity that can be done indoors with the final product enjoyed outdoors. Mother Earth News offers directions for making your own snowshoes. How Cast has video directions for making an emergency pair of snowshoes.

In the video below BBC Survival Expert Ray Mears teaches viewers how to make an igloo and what igloos were traditionally used for.




When I was about seven or eight I was given a copy of The American Boy's Handy Book(Amazon link). That book is filled with fun hands-on indoor and outdoor activities including an entire section devoted to snow forts and other snow-related activities.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Get Kids Exercising With Fun Activities from Sworkit Kids

Sworkit Kids a new iOS and Android app designed to get kids moving with short, fun exercises. The app features workouts of five to thirty minutes in length (you pick the length). Each workout has a mix of fun exercises like diagonal hopping, crab walking, and hopping on one foot. You can choose exercises or let the app create a sequence of exercises for you.

Applications for Education
Sworkit Kids is obviously a great app for physical education classes, but it could be used in just about any classroom setting. Sworkit Kids could be a great app to use when you want to get your students moving for a few minutes in your classroom. After a long period of sitting, get your students stretching and moving with a five minute fun routine from Sworkit.

Click here for the Android version.
Click here for the iOS version.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Free National Parks Passes for U.S. Fourth Grade Students

From my trip to Yellowstone in 2006.
Every Kid in a Park is a National Park Foundation initiative intended to get students and their families to explore national parks, forests, and wildlife refuges in the United States. The program provides fourth grade students in U.S. schools with a free pass to all national parks (parents and siblings also get in for free). Parents and students can register for passes individually. Teachers can click here to get passes for all of their fourth grade students.

Applications for Education
As long time readers of this blog know, I am a big advocate for getting kids outdoors to exercise, explore, and learn. Every Kid in a Park provides an excellent opportunity to introduce students to the joys of the great outdoors. To help teachers get the most out of a park visit with students, Every Kid in a Park offers some suggested field trip activities in every state in the union.

H/T to LifeHacker.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

10+ Resources for Learning About the Math and Science of Sports

As regular readers of this blog know, I am a proponent of getting kids involved in physical activities like bicycling, skiing, and playing team sports. I also like to see connections made between students' interest in sports and lessons in the classroom. The resources below can all be used to create lessons connected to students' interests in sports.

The Science of NFL Football is a series of ten videos from NBC Learn explaining and demonstrating math and science concepts as they relate to football. The list of topics covered in the Science of NFL Football includes Torque & Center of Mass, Pythagorean Theorem, Geometric Shapes, Projectile Motion & Parabolas, Vectors, Kinematics, Nutrition, and Newton's 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Laws of Motion. Every video in the Science of NFL Football is accompanied by a lesson plan appropriate for use in middle school classrooms.

In addition to the NFL Football lessons, NBC Learn offers lessons on golf, skiing, skating, swimming, and running.

If you have students who are interested in hockey, the following videos from Smarter Everyday could offer a good way to get students interested in thinking about the science of hockey.





Physics World offers three video lessons on the science of cycling, swimming, and running.

The Open University offers a playlist of video lessons about the science of bicycling. That playlist is embedded below.


Exploratorium has a little feature called the Science of Baseball. The Science of Baseball is a bit dated in its looks, but it still has some nice resources that can help students understand how a bit of science and mathematics is involved in the game. The Science of Baseball includes video and audio clips of baseball players and scientists explaining how the weather affects the flight of the ball, the physics of various pitches, and reaction times to thrown and batted baseballs.

ESPN's Sport Science has a handful of little resources about the science of baseball. One of those resources is Anatomy of a Pitch. In Anatomy of a Pitch seven pitchers from the Arizona Diamondbacks explain how they throw their signature pitches. Each explanation includes slow motion footage and the pitchers explaining the release points, finger positioning, leg uses, and rotations involved in each their pitches.

Two TED-Ed Lessons that I've recently featured are about Michael Jordan's hang time and the physics of kicking a soccer ball. Both videos are embedded below.



Friday, June 12, 2015

Plan and Share Biking and Walking Routes on Google's My Maps

This weekend some friends and I are going on a 75 mile bike ride. In preparation for the ride I created a map on Google's My Maps and shared it with the group. My Maps makes it fairly easy to create shareable maps of biking and hiking routes.

To create a biking or walking route map on My Maps first sign into your Google account then open My Maps. After signing into My Maps select the "draw a line" tool then choose "add biking route." To draw your biking route click on a starting location on the map then drag the line along a road. My Maps tries to predict where you are going to draw your route. The prediction feature can be handy when you're trying to make short biking routes. When you're making longer routes you will have to draw over the predicted lines if you don't want to use the suggested routes.

Applications for Education
The summer is here (in the Northern Hemisphere) and it's a good time to encourage students and their parents to enjoy some healthy outdoor activities. Creating some maps of safe biking routes and walking routes then posting them on a school website could be a good way to encourage participating in outdoor activities.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Kids Bowl Free - For Those Rainy Summer Days

I'm as big an advocate for kids playing outside as you will find. That said, there are time when playing outside just isn't an option. Whether it's too wet outside or too darn hot outside, there will be times this summer when we'll be looking for indoor activities for kids. In those cases take a look at your local bowling alley.

For the seventh or eighth year in a row Kids Bowl Free is offering two free games per day to students in the United States and Canada. Kids Bowl Free is a program funded by bowling alleys to provide students with a safe and fun activity during the summer.

To receive coupons for up to two free games of bowling per day, parents need to register on Kids Bowl Free. Each bowling center sets its own start and end date for the program so check the listings for a bowling center in your area.

Friday, November 28, 2014

Fun Things for Teachers and Students To Do In the Snow

This week the first real snowstorm of the year hit us in Maine. Winter is a tough time to get outside and exercise. But if you have some fun activities planned, it is a little bit easier to go outside. Here are some fun and somewhat educational activities to do in the snow.

NOVA, as part of their program on Denali, has directions for building a snow cave and directions for building an Igloo. (If you do either of these activities, make sure that you closely supervise students. A collapsed snow cave or Igloo can be very dangerous).

Boys' Life offers a list of outdoor winter games as well as directions for building igloos and snow shelters.

Making your own snowshoes is an activity that can be done indoors with the final product enjoyed outdoors. Mother Earth News offers directions for making your own snowshoes. How Cast has video directions for making an emergency pair of snowshoes.

In the video below BBC Survival Expert Ray Mears teaches viewers how to make an igloo and what igloos were traditionally used for.


When I was about seven or eight I was given a copy of The American Boy's Handy Book(Amazon link). That book is filled with fun hands-on indoor and outdoor activities including an entire section devoted to snow forts and other snow-related activities.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

The Physics of Cycling, Running, and Swimming

One of the things that I did this summer to improve myself was commit to getting on my bike more often and for longer distances. While I was on one of my rides last week I was reminded of a the Open University's series The Science Behind the Bike. As I watched one of those clips I noticed a related video on YouTube. That related video was The Physics of Cycling produced by Physics World. Physics World also produced The Physics of Running and The Physics of Swimming.


Applications for Education
All three of the Physics World videos mentioned above include discussions of the physics of the equipment in the sport and the physiology of the sport. After showing one or all of the videos to your students, challenge them to design a better piece of equipment to improve speed in a sport. Or in a physical education class have them test out techniques for improved speed and record the times to compare each technique used.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Common Craft Explains Everything You Need to Know to Understand Soccer

The FIFA World Cup started this week. Like many Americans, I don't quite get soccer. Common Craft has created a guide to soccer for folks like me who don't understand soccer. The Common Craft Soccer Guide contains twelve chapters about how the game of soccer is played. Each chapter contains text and animated GIFs demonstrating the key points of each chapter. You can view all of the guide online.

Applications for Education
The Common Craft Soccer Guide is perfectly timed for the World Cup. After the World Cup the guide could be a good resource for introducing kids to the basics of soccer.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

iPad Orienteering with Klikaklu

This week I am giving some guest bloggers the opportunity to share their ideas with you. This guest post comes from Ben Wiggins. 

Our Grade 2/3 composite classes have been involved in an iPad pilot project this year. Each class has 6 iPads in class which they can bring to specialist lessons such as PE. In PE we have used them, mainly with free apps, in a variety of ways including; completing google forms and book creator for reflection tasks; measuring heart rates; collaborating in the development of team strategies using Coachnote; recording performances with Ubersense and playing them back in slow motion; scanning QR codes to facilitate independent learning and collecting evidence of student learning in an online portfolio with Threering.

One of the most popular activities with the iPads has been Orienteering. We ran this unit concurrently with coordinates topic in Maths class. After a range of lead-up activities we moved onto completing orienteering courses on campus, using the free iPhone app Klikaklu.

Using Klikaklu the students chose a course and scanned the QR code to receive the first clue of the location they had to go to. All of the clues were grid references from the school map. Once the students had worked out the clue's location, off they ran. When they got there, they pressed the reveal button which then showed them a picture of an object in that location, which they had to also photograph. If their photo matched they were given the next clue.

The actual skills of taking a grid reference and working out where it is on a map and going to that location to find an object, are the same as in previous years. The big benefits of using Klikaklu, apart from increased student motivation, was the management of the lesson.

It didn’t take me long to set up 7 courses of varying difficulty. As they involved photographs of permanent objects (I did made the mistake of using the recycling bins as one location, and found one afternoon they had been taken away to be emptied), it meant no more setting out orienteering cards and collecting them in again everyday, or having to go off to find cards which have been accidentally moved!

With the app checking to see if the photographs match ,rather than me or students checking for correct letters or punch stamps on an answer card, it allowed me more time to help students master grid references, which increased the success rate.

I also upgraded my app, so that I could use Staggered Hunts. This means that several groups could all choose and complete the same hunt at the same time, but they would each be given the clues in a different order, thus avoiding groups just following each other. Another option I will use in the future is the Scavenger Hunt, when the students are given all of the clues and then they have to work out the quickest way to get to all of the locations – a bit more like ‘real’ orienteering. I also plan to have the students creating courses for each other.

I will leave the final word to one of our 8 year old boys who often finds PE a bit of a challenge. He ran past me several times in the lesson shouting out that this is brilliant. At the end of the lesson he came up and gave me a big hug and thanked me for “the best lesson ever!”

Ben Wiggins is presently a PYP Physical Education teacher at the International School of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. He has previously taught PE in the UK, Tanzania, Saudi Arabia and Thailand, to students as young as 3 through to those in University, and lots in between! You can can follow Ben’s journey of trying to integrate technology into his PE classes on his blog Ben’s PE Musings and on twitter @PE8574

Monday, July 15, 2013

5 Resources to Help Students Make Healthy Food Choices

The school district neighboring mine recently announced a new health and fitness curriculum that emphasizes "lifetime" fitness. One aspect of the curriculum focuses on helping students make healthy food choices. That news prompted me to put together this list of resources that can help students discover new healthy foods and make healthy food choices.

Chew or Die is a free iOS app that encourages people to try new healthy foods. The free app contains a series of healthy food challenges. The challenges include things like removing bread and potato-based starches with rice, trying a new vegetable, removing meat from your diet for a week, and sneaking more fiber into your diet. When you try a challenge take a picture of the food that you try and upload it to Chew or Die to challenge your friends to match your healthy choice.

Sugar Stacks is a good website for understanding how much sugar is in the food and beverages that we consume. Sugar Stacks lists popular food and beverage items in ten categories. Every item is pictured with a stack of sugar cubes. Each sugar cube represents four grams of sugar. This is a great way to see just how much sugar you really consume in your favorite snack or beverage.

Food Play Productions produces and performs educational plays about healthy lifestyle habits. In addition to the plays, Food Play produces a nice selection of resources for teachers to use in their classrooms. Food Play also has resources designed for kids, teens, and parents to access on their own. The type of resource that visitors to the site will find are things like "school wellness" checklists and "snacking guides."

Healthy Heroes is a free iPad app designed to help children learn about healthy snacks and meals. In the free app students feed healthy foods to a friendly monster. Before each activity students are shown a few healthy foods and they’re told a bit about the nutrition and calories of the foods. Then in the activity students tap mystery boxes to find the snacks and drag them to the monster’s mouth. Between each activity a short, healthy eating tip is played for students to watch.

Nourish Interactive is a great resource for elementary school health and nutrition teachers. Nourish Interactive offers lesson plans, printable guides and forms, resources for parents, and games for students. In the printables section teachers will find things like fun coloring pages as well as educational pages like "name the food group" and "exercise tracking sheets." The parents' section of Nourish Interactive offers parents tips on teaching healthy eating habits at home. The parents' section also offers tips and recipes for cooking healthy food with kids. The games section of Nourish Interactive contains ten online games for elementary school students. The games are designed to reinforce the lessons learned from parents and teachers using the teaching resources on Nourish Interactive.

Saturday, July 6, 2013

A Virtual Tour of the Tour de France and an Animated Explanation

The eighth stage of the Tour de France is happening today. We may never ride in the race, but we can virtually tour this year's race route through Google Maps. Just as they did last year, Cycling the Alps has published a Google Maps tour of the race. You can zoom in on the course, see the elevation profiles of the stages, and navigate through the stages.

Check out this animated video to learn all about the tactics of the race, the logistics of the race, the physiology of riding in the race, and many other interesting facts about the world's most famous bicycle race.


H/T to The Adventure Blog and Google Maps Mania.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Get Healthy With Google

Last week the Official Google Blog ran a blog post about how many Google apps and services can be used to support and promote healthy lifestyle choices. The suggestions include using some of these Chrome apps to track what you eat, record your exercise habits, and to find healthy foods. If you don't want to use an app, you could create a Google Form for recording your eating and exercising habits. I use Forms on my Android phone quite a bit.

Applications for Education
Reading Google's post about using their services to help you get healthy prompted me to think about using Google Apps in health and physical education courses. Challenge your students to see how many miles or kilometers they can cumulatively walk as a class in one week. A shared Google Form is a great place to log that information.

Ask your students to try healthy snacks in lieu of junk food and record those changes in a Google Form. Use the Google Search tools for food data to compare the calories and carbohydrate content of the junk snacks with the healthy snacks. Then at the end of the week tally up the data in the shared Google Form to see the cumulative effects of making healthy snack choices. If you're looking for a tool that will encourage students try healthy snacks, check out Chew or Die that I reviewed last week on iPad Apps for School.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Kids Can Bowl for Free This Summer

Just as they have for the last few summers, bowling centers around the U.S. and Canada are offering students two free games every day. To bowl for free students (or their parents) need to register on Kids Bowl Free. On Kids Bowl Free you can find the bowling alley closest to you.

Applications for Education
Kids Bowl Free is awarding 80 $200 grants to teachers every month through July 2013. The grants are for classroom supplies. You can apply for a grant here