Showing posts with label QR Treasure Hunt Generator. Show all posts
Showing posts with label QR Treasure Hunt Generator. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Send Your Students on a QR Code Treasure Hunt

QR Codes are all around us today. Open a magazine, a catalog, or glance at a bulletin board and you're likely to see a QR code. QR Codes make it easy to jump to a website or download a file on your mobile device. QR codes and QR code reader apps are one of the many ways that cell phones can be used in schools for academic purposes. To that end, Russel Tarr the QR Treasure Hunt Generator.

The QR Treasure Hunt Generator provides you with all of the things you need to get started creating your own QR codes and using them in your classroom. To use the QR Treasure Hunt Generator type out a series of questions and answers, generate the QR codes using the tool Russel Tarr provides, then print and display the codes around your classroom or school. Click here to view a sample QR Treasure Hunt.

If you're looking for a QR code reader app, I use and recommend QR Droid for Android devices. For iOS devices take a look at QR Scanner or QR Code Reader.

Applications for Education
Creating QR Treasure Hunts could be a great way to get students moving and learning at the same time. With a QR Treasure Hunt a quest for information can become a physical exercise as well as an intellectual exercise.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

QRPedia - QR Codes for Wikipedia Entries

QRPedia is a neat website that was featured on Read Write Web this morning. RWW called it "the coolest QR thingy ever made." I don't think it's the coolest ever, but it is pretty neat. QRPedia is a tool for creating QR codes for any Wikipedia page in any language. When scanned the codes generated by QRPedia will automatically recognize the language of your phone and delivers the corresponding Wikipedia page in that language. Watch the video below to see how QRPedia is being used in museums.



Applications for Education
One way that you might use QRPedia in your school is to have students add QRPedia codes to collage-type assignments to enable the sharing of more information in the same amount of space as before. For example, you could have students add QRPedia codes to a Glogster collage.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Thinking About QR Codes and How to Make Them

QR Code for this blog
Today while I was driving from my old house to my new house (something I've done at least ten times this week in an attempt to get myself settled before school starts tomorrow) I got to thinking about QR codes. I wrote about QR codes last month when I shared Russel Tarr's QR Treasure Hunt Generator. At the time I was so focused on the idea of getting students up and physically active that I totally overlooked the biggest benefits of an activity like a QR Code Treasure is that when students scan a QR code and access the information they then have a highly portable record of information. That portable record can go anywhere they take their phones.

Applications for Education
I create all of my documents including study sheets for my students using Google Documents. In that past I have made those documents public and posted them on my classroom blog. This fall I'll continue to do that, but I think I will also create a QR code for those documents so that students can have quick portable access to the study guide. I'm using QR Droid to create QR codes by simply entering the URL of the page for which I want a QR code generated.

Friday, July 22, 2011

QR Code Treasure Hunt Generator

Open a magazine, a catalog, or take a look at sign in your local grocery market these days and you're likely to see a QR code. (The QR code to subscribe to Free Technology for Teachers is pictured to the left). QR codes and QR code reader apps are one of the many ways that cell phones can be used in schools for academic purposes. To that end, Russel Tarr has developed the QR Treasure Hunt Generator.

The QR Treasure Hunt Generator provides you with all of the things you need to get started creating your own QR codes and using them in your classroom. To use the QR Treasure Hunt Generator type out a series of questions and answers, generate the QR codes using the tool Russel Tarr provides, then print and display the codes around your classroom or school. Click here to view a sample QR Treasure Hunt.

The QR Treasure Hunt Generator recommends having students visit Kaywa to get QR readers for their phones. My recommendation is if your students have Android phones have them try the free QR Droid app. If your students have iPhones they can try the free NeoReader App.

Applications for Education
Creating QR Treasure Hunts could be a great way to get students moving and learning at the same time. With a QR Treasure Hunt a quest for information can become a physical exercise as well as an intellectual exercise.