Showing posts with label Screenr. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Screenr. Show all posts

Monday, April 18, 2011

Screenr No Longer Requires a Twitter Account

A few times over the years I've written about and had a guest blogger write about using screencasts to clarify instructions to students and staff. In almost all of those posts the free screencasting tool Screenr has been mentioned. I just used Screenr a few minutes ago and learned that Screenr recently made some changes that make it easier to use.

Until last month Screenr required users to sign into the service by using a Twitter account. This was a turn-off for folks who don't use Twitter. Now Screenr allows you to use your Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Windows Live, or LinkedIn account to create recordings. Keeping with the theme of not using Twitter, Screenr now allows you to comment on your videos without having to post those comments to Twitter.

If you're in the habit of creating screencasts and embedding them into your blog or website for others to see, Screenr has created a new universal player that you can embed. This universal player will automatically display the right kind of video for the device it's being viewed on. So if people view your site on their phones they will be shown a video that plays correctly on their screens.

Learn more about Screenr in the short video below.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Screencasting to collaborate or show off student work

Hi I am Michael Kaechele (concretekax on Twitter). I teach middle school technology and 6th grade math. I want to say thanks to Richard for the opportunity to share my classroom with you.

In my 8th grade technology class students create projects in various programs such as Google Sketchup and Pivot. The students enjoy these programs and the opportunity to creatively express themselves. One issue is that these programs are not easily shared on their blogs. In order to view them one must first download the programs and then receive the files by e-mail. Enter screencasting as an easy solution.

The tools I have used include Screenr, Screentoaster, Screencast-o-matic, and Jing (Screencastle and Screenjelly are two more comparable options). Richard has shared these screencasting tools in the past, so I will focus on how I use them in class rather than rating them against each other. I will only say that I find them very comparable as far as features go, but I do prefer the ones that do not require downloading (not Jing). My main basis of choice was which ones worked around our filter at school. I did have issues with Screenr and Screentoaster being blocked but they are good choices if they are accessible. Students will also need an e-mail account to sign up for them.

Students used a screen cast tool to record their Pivot animation and then the screen cast program creates an edit code that students can use to post on their blogs or I can post on the class wiki.


In Sketchup students use the "orbit" tool to zoom in and spin their 3D drawings to show it from all angles or even take us inside their homes. Students can also record themselves describing what they are showing on the screencast. The screencasts are easy to use and students need few instructions. The screencast programs give both embed codes and URL links to share them. This allows students to share their projects with anyone who may not have the programs downloaded on their computer.



In math class, we had a student teacher Skype in from Canada. He created a challenge problem for us. The students then showed their solution in Geometer's Sketchpad. One student demonstrated the solution while another student narrated in a microphone. Screencasting is a great way to work anachronistically and collaboratively with another classroom in another part of the country or world. Forget the bulletin board or school wall. Post your best student work on the web for all to see!


Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Screenpresso Looks Promising for Screen Captures

Screenpresso is a new screen capture program for Windows. Screenpresso has all of the features such as image resizing, annotation options, and format variety that you would expect from a screen capture program. Screenpresso also features like Twitter integration which are not always found in screen capture programs. The most unique option in Screenpresso is the ability to stitch together multiple screen captures. Stitching allows you to include scrolling in your screen captures. The scrolling option could be very useful for showing people how to work through a large page that doesn't fit into a typical screen capture. For example all of the front page of Free Technology for Teachers doesn't fit into a typical screen capture. Using Screenpresso you could create a screen capture of the entire front page.

Applications for Education
Screen captures, particularly annotated screen captures, can be very useful for giving directions to students and colleagues about how to use a piece of software or how to navigate a website. Using Screenpresso you can make annotated screen captures then post them to Twitter, email them, or post them on your blog or wiki.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Four Free Tools for Creating Screencasts
A Very Simple Way to Make Screen Captures
Screenr - A Simple Tool for Creating Screencasts

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Screenr - A Simple Tool for Creating Screencasts

Some readers may have seen my Tweet about this earlier this evening. Screenr is a very simple, easy-to-use tool for creating screencast videos. You do not need to register in order to use Screenr, but if you want to save your recordings you do need a Twitter account. Screenr uses your Twitter ID to save your recording and publish it to Twitter (you can opt not to publish to Twitter). The recordings you make using Screenr can also be published to YouTube or you can download your recordings.

To use Screenr simply go to the site, click the "record" link, drag a box around the area of your screen that you want to record and then press the red "record" button. Screenr will record for up to five minutes. When you're done recording, click publish and you're done. It really takes just a few minutes to create a screencast video using Screenr.

Embedded below is the sample video I made using Screenr.


Applications for Education
Making screencast videos is a good way to create a record of the instructions that you may have to frequently give to students or colleagues. Post your screencasts online and your students and colleagues can watch them when you're not available to answer their "how-to" questions. In the past I have created screencasts for my students about adding pages to wikis.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Four Free Tools for Creating Screencasts
A Very Simple Way to Make Screen Captures
Jing Leaves Beta - Use It For Free or Go Pro