Showing posts with label Story of Stuff. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Story of Stuff. Show all posts

Sunday, January 29, 2012

Economy Map - Visualizations of the US Economy's Environmental Impact

Economy Map is an interactive visualization of the environmental impact of the U.S. economy. The visualization offers a series of graphs and charts that represent the impact of economic activities in terms of global warming, ozone depletion, human toxicity, aquatic ecotoxicity, acidification, and other environmental impact measurements. Economy Map users can expand or contract the scope of the visualizations according to industry sectors and environmental impact indicators.

Economy Map can be viewed online or downloaded and run as a free-standing Java applet. Either way you do have to register to use Economy Map. The video below provides a brief introduction to Economy Map. 


Applications for Education
Those of you who have watched and or taught lessons based around the ideas presented in the Story of Stuff may find Economy Map to be a good follow-up resource.

Monday, January 31, 2011

The Story of Bottled Water

A recent post on the Environmental Graffiti blog, Where Does Drinking Water Get Its Taste? reminded me of the Story of Bottled Water video produced by Annie Leonard and her team at The Story of Stuff. The Story of Bottled Water takes a look at the environmental and economic impacts of bottled water.


Applications for Education
The Story of Stuff and The Story of Bottled Water do have critics that accuse them of being "too liberal" and or not tell the whole story and or being too critical of industry. I've had high school (18 years old) students watch the Story of Stuff and have those criticisms of the video. That said, the videos are thought-provoking and became the basis of a great classroom discussion about the role of media in shaping citizens' thoughts about economics, the environment, and politics.

Thursday, December 25, 2008

The Story of Stuff

The Story of Stuff has been around for while, in fact it's now been watched more than four million times. For those that are not familiar with it, The Story of Stuff is a twenty minute video that examines the cycle of production and consumption that exists with most consumer goods. The video is centered around questions examining how consumer goods found at discount retailers are produced at a low cost. The video is embedded below the "applications for education" section.

Since I first watched The Story of Stuff last winter there have been some additions to the website including video annotations, multiple translations, fact sheets, and a glossary of terms.

Applications for Education
The Story of Stuff is a good video to start a lesson about economics and or the environmental impact of consumerism. One way to make the story more relevant to students would be to have students identify the products within your classroom that have usable shelf-life of one year, two years, or five years.