Showing posts with label StoryMap JS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label StoryMap JS. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Five Tools for Telling Stories With Maps

One of my favorite alternatives to traditional book report assignments is having students create multimedia maps based on books they've read. Google Lit Trips first made that idea popular more than a decade ago. Of course, creating a multimedia map is also an excellent way for students to summarize and geo-locate a series of related historical events. Here are five tools that students can use to create and tell stories with maps.

Google Earth - Desktop Version
The desktop version of Google Earth provides one of the classic ways to create a map-based, multimedia story. Students can add pictures, text, and videos to the placemarkers in their Google Earth tours. And students can use the built-in recording tools to make tours that viewers can watch on their own. Here's a short overview of how to make a Google Earth tour. Check out Google Lit Trips for ideas on using Google Earth for literature lessons.



Google Earth - Web Browser Version
While it still doesn't have quite as many options as the desktop version, the browser version of Google Earth does now have tools for making your multimedia tours.


VR Tour Creator
Google's VR Tour Creator lets anyone make a virtual reality tour that can be played back in your web browser and or in the Google Expeditions app. Don't limit use of VR Tour Creator to geography lessons. You can have students use it to make virtual reality book tours. Here's an introduction to using VR Tour Creator.


ESRI Story Maps
ESRI Story Maps is a tool that you can use to create a variety of map-based stories. The basic ESRI Story Map lets you combine pictures and locations to playback as a series of slides. Here's a good example of an ESRI Story Map.

Storymap JS
Storymap JS offers a nice way for students to create stories in which slides are matched to locations on a map. Here's an overview of how it works. StoryMap JS can be used by students to tell all kinds of stories including, as demonstrated below, personal stories that are connected to locations.

Friday, November 8, 2019

Mapping Thanksgiving

Where Does Your Thanksgiving Dinner Come From? is an interactive storymap that displays where eight popular Thanksgiving foods are grown and harvested in the United States. The storymap includes a map for each ingredient. Each map shows the locations of commercial producers. Fun facts are included in the storymap too. For example, did you know that Illinois has at least twice as many acres of pumpkins as any state?



Applications for Education
When I shared it last year I suggested using it as a way to spark students' curiosity to investigate questions about the origins of traditional Thanksgiving foods. This year I'd like to suggest that students can create their own storymaps about Thanksgiving. Students could do that with tools provided by ESRI. An easy way to do it is to use StoryMap JS. In the following video I demonstrate how to create a storymap with StoryMap JS.

Monday, March 18, 2019

How to Create a Map-based Story With StoryMap JS

StoryMap JS is a free tool that comes from the same people that offer the popular multimedia timeline tool called Timeline JS. On StoryMap JS you can create map-based stories. You create the story by matching slides to locations on a map. In the following video I demonstrate how to use StoryMap JS.


Applications for Education
StoryMap JS can be used by students to tell the stories of great explorers and their explorations. Or as you saw in my video above, students can use StoryMap JS to tell personal stories that are connected to locations. While you could do similar things in Google's My Maps tool, StoryMap JS offers a better overall presentation particularly with regards to transitions between markers on the map.

Monday, November 26, 2018

800+ Persuasive Maps - And a Tool for Making Your Own

About a week ago Open Culture published an article about Cornell University's Persuasive Cartography collection. I hadn't seen that collection before so I went down a rabbit hole looking at map after map for a good 45 minutes.

Persuasive maps aren't maps that you would use to teach a classic geography lesson. That's because persuasive maps are maps that were created for the purpose of sending a message. In Cornell University's Persuasive Cartography collection you will find maps that were created to persuade and satirize. The maps in this collection date back as far as 1491 and up to 2012. Browse through the collection and you'll find maps about the Cold War, imperialism, moral issues, social causes, and plenty of maps related to various war efforts.

Applications for Education
You can browse Cornell University's Persuasive Cartography collection from the homepage of the collection. The better way to search and browse is to jump directly into collection listings here.

I found the collection of maps related to imperialism to be particularly interesting. The maps in the collection show a variety of viewpoints geographically, politically, and historically with regards to imperialism. I'd use that collection that spark discussion in my classroom about what imperialism means, who it affects, and how viewpoints change over time.

If you teach high school or middle school students, StoryMap JS is a good tool for telling stories through the use of maps, text, and multimedia.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Great Journeys and Explorations - Stories Told With Interactive Maps and Timelines

Ever since I was an elementary school student I have loved reading about great journeys and explorations like those of Lewis and Clark, James Cook, and Robert Peary. As an adult I still love those stories and recently started reading The River of Doubt for a second time. Picking up that book reminded me of one of my favorite multimedia presentation tools for use in social studies classes.

StoryMap JS lets you combine elements of timelines and maps to create mapped stories. On StoryMap JS you create slides that are matched to locations on your map. Each slide in your story can include images or videos along with text. As you scroll through your story there are simple transitions between each slide. StoryMap JS integrates with your Google Drive account. To get started with StoryMap JS you have to grant it access to your Google Drive account. StoryMap JS will create a folder in your Google Drive account where all of your storymap projects will be saved. With StoryMap JS connected to your Google Drive account you will be able to pull images from your Google Drive account to use in your StoryMap JS projects.

Applications for Education
StoryMap JS can be used by students to tell the stories of great explorers and their explorations. While you could do something similar in Google's My Maps, StoryMap JS offers a better overall presentation particularly with regards to dates.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Storymap JS - Tell Stories With Maps

The New York Times has a new feature called Harriet Tubman's Path to Freedom. The feature is a presented in scrolling map format. The map is combined with a timeline format that shows the sequence of and locations of significant moments of Tubman's work in freeing herself and helping other slaves escape. Harriet Tubman's Path to Freedom is part of a larger series of stories about the Underground Railroad.

Looking at the presentation of Harriet Tubman's Path to Freedom reminded me an excellent storytelling tool called StoryMap JS. StoryMap JS comes from the same people that offer Timeline JS. On StoryMap JS you can create mapped stories. On StoryMap JS you create slides that are matched to locations on your map. Each slide in your story can include images or videos along with text. As you scroll through your story there are simple transitions between each slide.

StoryMap JS integrates with your Google Drive account. To get started with StoryMap JS you have to grant it access to your Google Drive account. StoryMap JS will create a folder in your Google Drive account where all of your storymap projects will be saved. With StoryMap JS connected to your Google Drive account you will be able to pull images from your Google Drive account to use in your StoryMap JS projects.

Applications for Education
StoryMap JS can be a great tool for students to use to tell stories that have strong geographic connections. One of the best examples of StoryMap JS for classroom use is found in the Manifest Destiny storymap featured on the StoryMap JS homepage.

H/T to Larry Ferlazzo for the link to Harriet Tubman's Path to Freedom.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

StoryMap JS - Create a Mapped Story to Save in Google Drive

StoryMap JS is a nice tool for creating mapped stories. On StoryMap JS you create slides that are matched to locations on your map. Each slide in your story can include images or videos along with text. As you scroll through your story there are simple transitions between each slide.

StoryMap JS integrates with your Google Drive account. To get started with StoryMap JS you have to grant it access to your Google Drive account. StoryMap JS will create a folder in your Google Drive account where all of your storymap projects will be saved. With StoryMap JS connected to your Google Drive account you will be able to pull images from your Google Drive account to use in your StoryMap JS projects.

Applications for Education
One of the best examples of StoryMap JS for classroom use is found in the Manifest Destiny storymap featured on the StoryMap JS homepage. StoryMap JS could be a great way for students to create visual summaries of historical events and themes. Students could also use StoryMap JS to create short historical fiction works.