Showing posts with label TeachMeet BETT. Show all posts
Showing posts with label TeachMeet BETT. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Going to BETT? Don't Miss TeachMeet BETT

One of my favorite events of the year is the TeachMeet that happens at the BETT Show. A TeachMeet is a gathering of educators who give micro (7 minutes) and nano (2 minutes) presentations on work that they have actually done in classrooms. I enjoy this format because a lot of people get to speak and because it avoids the product pitches that sometimes sneak their way into "demo slams." There is time for connecting with other educators during a TeachMeet too.

The last handful of years the TeachMeet at BETT happened in a space within Excel London. This year it's happening at a restaurant/ bar just outside of the expo building. My guess is that space will be a bit limited compared to previous years. So if you're planning to attend TeachMeet BETT, get your ticket soon (they're free).

Take a look at this short slideshow to learn more about TeachMeet BETT including how you can submit a presentation.

Thanks to Danny Nicholson at The Whiteboard Blog for the information about this year's TeachMeet at BETT. 

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Gamifying Writing Instruction

Last night at TeachMeet BETT Simon Johnson gave a great little talk about 21 Things Every Teacher Should Try. He didn't cover all 21 things in the talk (he only had seven minutes to talk), but one of the things that he did talk about was game-based learning. The example that he gave was gamifiying writing instruction.

In Simon's example of gamifying writing instruction he shared a grid in which students were given points based on the type and complexity of the words that they used in their writing. For example, students might earn five points for correctly using an adverb. Or they could earn could earn points for correctly using words from a vocabulary list.

Generally, I tend to think about "gamification" as a kind of a gimmick. That said, I can see it being beneficial to some students in the right context. For students who have a generally negative view of school and have become accustomed to grading practices that detract points for not doing something, a gamification of writing could feel better. Rather than seeing that they didn't use "x" number of vocabulary words correctly they could see it as "I scored 500 points" for using "x" number of words correctly.