Showing posts with label TeachMeet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label TeachMeet. Show all posts

Saturday, August 8, 2020

Intro to Simple Electronics in Makerspaces

Yesterday morning I gave a short virtual presentation for the New Jersey TeachMeet. The topic of my presentation was an introduction to using simple electronics in makerspaces. The presentation focused on three main resources. Those resources are Microsoft's Hacking STEM, Exploratorium's Science Snacks, and TinkerCad. The slides from my presentation are embedded below and can also be seen here.

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Going to BETT? Don't Miss TeachMeet BETT

One of my favorite events of the year is the TeachMeet that happens at the BETT Show. A TeachMeet is a gathering of educators who give micro (7 minutes) and nano (2 minutes) presentations on work that they have actually done in classrooms. I enjoy this format because a lot of people get to speak and because it avoids the product pitches that sometimes sneak their way into "demo slams." There is time for connecting with other educators during a TeachMeet too.

The last handful of years the TeachMeet at BETT happened in a space within Excel London. This year it's happening at a restaurant/ bar just outside of the expo building. My guess is that space will be a bit limited compared to previous years. So if you're planning to attend TeachMeet BETT, get your ticket soon (they're free).

Take a look at this short slideshow to learn more about TeachMeet BETT including how you can submit a presentation.

Thanks to Danny Nicholson at The Whiteboard Blog for the information about this year's TeachMeet at BETT. 

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Gamifying Writing Instruction

Last night at TeachMeet BETT Simon Johnson gave a great little talk about 21 Things Every Teacher Should Try. He didn't cover all 21 things in the talk (he only had seven minutes to talk), but one of the things that he did talk about was game-based learning. The example that he gave was gamifiying writing instruction.

In Simon's example of gamifying writing instruction he shared a grid in which students were given points based on the type and complexity of the words that they used in their writing. For example, students might earn five points for correctly using an adverb. Or they could earn could earn points for correctly using words from a vocabulary list.

Generally, I tend to think about "gamification" as a kind of a gimmick. That said, I can see it being beneficial to some students in the right context. For students who have a generally negative view of school and have become accustomed to grading practices that detract points for not doing something, a gamification of writing could feel better. Rather than seeing that they didn't use "x" number of vocabulary words correctly they could see it as "I scored 500 points" for using "x" number of words correctly.

Saturday, January 25, 2014

The Week In Review - Lost In London

Good morning from London where I have spent the last two days at BETT and TeachMeet BETT. The TeachMeet event was the highlight of the two days. During the TeachMeet a dozen or more teachers gave mini-presentations about the interesting ways they're using technology in their classrooms. I sat in the front row and gleaned some great ideas from the presentations. I'll share a bit more of that experience in some new posts next week.

Now I'm off to see the British Museum. I got lost yesterday trying to find the right tube station, so I'm sure it will happen again today. But that's part of the fun of learning about a new place. Wherever you are this weekend, I hope that you have something fun planned too.

Here are this week's most popular posts:
1. Teachit Timer - A Slick Classroom Activity Timer
2. Wellcome Images Releases 100,000 Images Under Creative Commons Licensing
3. Read Write Think Timeline - A Timeline Tool for Almost All Devices
4. An Interactive Timeline of Music Genre Popularity 1950 to Now
5. Activities for Practicing Listening and Speaking Skills
6. How to Develop Web Search Challenges for Students
7. How to Create Contact Groups to Make Sharing Google Documents Easier

Would you like to have me visit your school this year?
Click here to learn more about my professional development offerings.

Please visit the official advertisers that help keep this blog going.
Practical Ed Tech is the brand through which I offer PD webinars.
IXL offers a huge assortment of mathematics lesson activities.
Typing Club offers free typing lessons for students.
Discovery Education & Wilkes University offer online courses for earning Master's degrees in Instructional Media.
MasteryConnect provides a network for teachers to share and discover Common Core assessments.
ABCya.com is a provider of free educational games for K-5.
The University of Maryland Baltimore County offers graduate programs for teachers.
Boise State University offers a 100% online program in educational technology.
EdTechTeacher is organizing two iPad summits this school year.
Classmint offers a nice multimedia flashcard service.
StoryBoard That is a great tool for creating comics and more.
Fresno Pacific University offers a wide variety of technology courses for teachers.

How to Subscribe to Free Technology for Teachers
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Thursday, January 23, 2014

What a Cloakroom Can Teach Students About Web Search Strategies

I’m currently in London, England for the BETT Show and TeachMeet BETT 2014. As is the case with most flights going to Europe from the east coast of the U.S. my flight left in the evening and arrived in London in the middle of the morning. This meant that I was too early to check into my hotel. I knew this ahead of time and figured that I could probably check my luggage at the ExCel Conference Center where the BETT Show is being held. I wanted to confirm this ahead of time so I spent some time searching on the BETT and ExCel websites for “coat check,” “bag check,” “coat room,” and “bag storage” in the hopes of confirming my assumption. My searches were fruitless.

Eventually I confirmed my assumption about a baggage check when I stumbled upon a map of the conference center. In browsing around the map I discovered a “cloakroom.” When I hear “cloak” I instantly think of the Count Chocula character from the cereal boxes of the 1980’s (my mother never let us eat that kind of cereal despite our pleas). I never thought to use the word “cloak” in any of my searches for information about storing my jacket and small bag for the afternoon. Cloak is just not a regular part of my American vernacular.

I have no doubt that students sometimes run into roadblocks in their searches for the same reason that I didn’t find anything in my searches; we’re stuck in our own vernacular. Had I used a thesaurus when I got stuck, I probably would have found the word cloak and confirmed my assumptions about checking my luggage for the day. The lesson here is when your search has hit a roadblock, try a thesaurus to find words that might lead you to better search results.

Saturday, January 18, 2014

The Week in Review - In the Dog House

Good morning from Woodstock, Maine where the sunshine has given way to clouds and snow is on its way. This week I gave presentation at Archbishop Williams High School in Braintree, Massachusetts. Prior to that trip I had been home for over a month and my dogs had gotten out of their kennel routines. When I went to drop them off on Thursday morning Max refused to go into his kennel. Eventually, to get him in the kennel I did the sensible thing and went into the kennel first and lured him in. It proved to be a great photo opportunity for the kennel caretakers. Next week I am going to London for BETT and TeachMeet, but my housesitter is staying with Morrison and Max so that I don't have to get into a kennel again.

Morrison, Max, and I are heading out to spend the afternoon on some new snowshoeing trails I discovered. Wherever you are this weekend, I hope you have something fun to do too.

Here are this week's most popular posts:
1. Seven Free Online Whiteboard Tools for Teachers and Students
2. Free Ebook - Digital Storytelling With Comics
3. Would You Rather - Quick and Fun Math Lessons
4. TED Introduces TED-Ed Clubs to Get Kids Talking About Big Ideas
5. Compare the Size of Countries and States With These Map Mash-ups
6. Webinar Recording - Digital Storytelling With Comics
7. Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools

Would you like to have me visit your school this year?
Click here to learn more about my professional development offerings.

Please visit the official advertisers that help keep this blog going.
Practical Ed Tech is the brand through which I offer PD webinars.
IXL offers a huge assortment of mathematics lesson activities.
Typing Club offers free typing lessons for students.
Discovery Education & Wilkes University offer online courses for earning Master's degrees in Instructional Media.
MasteryConnect provides a network for teachers to share and discover Common Core assessments.
ABCya.com is a provider of free educational games for K-5.
The University of Maryland Baltimore County offers graduate programs for teachers.
Boise State University offers a 100% online program in educational technology.
EdTechTeacher is organizing two iPad summits this school year.
Classmint offers a nice multimedia flashcard service.
StoryBoard That is a great tool for creating comics and more.
Fresno Pacific University offers a wide variety of technology courses for teachers.

How to Subscribe to Free Technology for Teachers
Subscribe via RSSSubscribe via Email.
Like Free Technology for Teachers on  Facebook.
Find me on Twitter, on Google+, or on Pinterest.