Showing posts with label Volcano. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Volcano. Show all posts

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Exploring the Volcanoes of Yellowstone

The USGS in partnership with the University of Utah produces the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory records and publishes data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. Much of the material on the site is very scientific in nature, but the Observatory website does offer some educational materials accessible to the non-scientist. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory offers three videos about the volcanoes of Yellowstone. The Observatory also offers photographic tours of Yellowstone.

Some other good resources for learning about Yellowstone National Park can be found in Google Earth. Turn on the National Geographic and Streetview layers to some excellent images from within the park.

Applications for Education
Yellowstone National Park is known for its natural wonders. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory provides some resources for high school science teachers to use in teaching about the geology of Yellowstone.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

11 Resources for Teaching and Learning About the Forces of Nature

After last weekend's visit from Hurricane Irene I have forces of nature on my brain. I guess there is something about seeing a giant tree across your neighbor's yard will do that to you. Therefore, today I assembled a list of some of my favorite resources for teaching and learning about forces of nature.

This one is a couple of years old but it is still good. USA Today has a slide presentation explaining how tornadoes are formed and what to do if you find yourself in the path of a tornado. The slide show is controlled by the viewer who moves a slider at the bottom of the screen to explore the formation of a tornado.


Forces of Nature is a film produced by National Geographic designed to educate students about volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornadoes. The Forces of Nature website provides a nice list of complete lesson plans for teachers of students in grades K through 12. Even if you can't get a copy of the movie, most of the lesson plans and activities are still very usable. Teachers of grades K through 6 may also want to check out the National Geographic Kids page titled Ten Freaky Forces of Nature.

If you can't acquire the Forces of Nature film (available on Amazon $17.99), you may want to consider a similar film from National Geographic titled Violent Earth. Violent Earth can be viewed for free on Snag Films. Using Snag Films you can also embed the Violent Earth video into your blog, wiki, or website.

The USGS in partnership with the University of Utah produces the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory records and publishes data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. Much of the material on the site is very scientific in nature, but the Observatory website does offer some educational materials accessible to the non-scientist. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory offers three videos about the volcanoes of Yellowstone. The Observatory also offers photographic tours of Yellowstone.


Shape It Up is one of many good educational games and activities on Kinetic City. Shape It Up is an activity that would be good for use in an elementary school Earth Science lesson. The activity presents students with "before" and "after" images of a piece of Earth. Students then have to select the force nature and the span of time it took to create the "after" picture. If students choose incorrectly, Shape It Up will tell the student and they can choose again.

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean.

The USGS produces a good assortment of resources for teaching and learning about earthquakes. The USGS has resources for teachers and for students on every grade level from elementary school through college. Not included in the teachers resource section, but including in the general education page, are these flash animations of earthquakes and seismic activities. For Google Earth users the USGS produces Google Earth files for viewing earthquakes. One set of Google Earth files that the USGS produces allows you to view seismic activity in near-real time (the file refreshes every five minutes).

Violent Earth, produced by National Geographic, is a film about the causes of earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes. It's an excellent documentary if you have the time to watch it. But if you're searching for a shorter video explanation of the causes of tsunamis, National Geographic has something to fit that bill too. Tsunamis 101 is a three and one-half minute video about how a tsunami is caused and why they can be so deadly. The video is embedded below.



Volcano Above the Clouds is a NOVA program that chronicles an ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro by a group of climbers and scientists. In addition to the video, Volcano Above the Clouds offers a large collection of materials and teaching guides for learning about volcanoes, glaciers, and climate change with Mount Kilimanjaro at the center of each lesson. As Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the Seven Summits of the world, NOVA provides a slideshow of the Seven Summits which puts Kilimanjaro into perspective relative to those other summits.

The BBC has a series of interactive guides that explain how natural disasters are caused. Included in this series is a twelve part animated explanation of volcanic eruptions. The series also includes explanations of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis.

















For learning about earthquakes, the BBC has an animated guide to earthquakes. National Geographic offers an in-depth lesson plan for teaching elementary school students about earthquakes and volcanoes. National Geographic also has some excellent educational films about earthquakes, but if you do not have the budget to purchase them you may want to try Snag Films where you can watch full length documentaries like Violent Earth for free.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Resources About Mount St. Helens 30 Years Later

Today marks the thirtieth anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens. I was reminded of this by Amanda Dykes who shared a link to these satellite images of Mount St. Helens the images chronicle the years 1979 through 2009. You can view the images individually or open them as a slideshow in Google Earth. All of the images are provided by NASA.

CNN has a narrated slideshow in which eyewitnesses and experts discuss the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

National Geographic has three easily accessible resources about the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Lost On Mount St. Helens is a short video about Ralph Killian who lost his son and daughter-in-law in the eruption of Mount St. Helens and spent a year looking for them. Mountain Transformed is a picture gallery chronicling Mount St. Helens from eruption to today. Rebirth of the Blast Zone is an interactive illustration of the life that exists in the 230 square mile blast zone around Mount St. Helens.

The BBC's Bitesize section has an online lesson about volcanoes that includes Mount St. Helens. The lesson is appropriate for elementary school and middle school students.

And take a trip in the time machine and watch a 1980 CBS News report about the eruption of Mount St. Helens.


For some resources and lessons about volcanoes in general see 5 Resources for Learning About Volcanoes.

Monday, April 19, 2010

5 Resources for Learning About Volcanoes

The eruption of the volcano in Iceland may present teachers with an opportunity to combine lessons in science and current events. The list below contains five resources for learning about volcanoes in general. If you're looking for links specifically about the volcano in Iceland, Larry Ferlazzo has a good list going.

Volcano Above the Clouds is a NOVA program that chronicles an ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro by a group of climbers and scientists. In addition to the video, Volcano Above the Clouds offers a large collection of materials and teaching guides for learning about volcanoes, glaciers, and climate change with Mount Kilimanjaro at the center of each lesson. As Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the Seven Summits of the world, NOVA provides a slideshow of the Seven Summits which puts Kilimanjaro into perspective relative to those other summits.

Forces of Nature is a feature of National Geographic's website. There are four sections to the Forces of Nature. The sections focus on tornadoes, hurricanes, volcanoes, and earthquakes. There are six parts to each section. In the last part of each section students can create their own natural disaster using the knowledge they've gained from the previous five parts about how a natural disaster is formed. The Forces of Nature also offers photo galleries and interactive maps about tornadoes, hurricanes, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

The BBC has a series of interactive guides that explain how natural disasters are caused. Included in this series is a twelve part animated explanation of volcanic eruptions. The series also includes explanations of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis.

















National Geographic's film Volcano: Nature's Inferno follows scientists as they explain what causes volcanoes to erupt and as the scientists try to predict when volcanoes will erupt. Watch the film for free on Snag Films.

The PBS Series Savage Earth offers animations how volcanic eruptions happen. The series also contains animations that explain earthquakes and tsunamis.

Close-up Aerial Views of Iceland's Erupting Volcano

The eruption of the volcano in Iceland has stalled travel from North America to Europe. Today's episode of CNN Student News offers close-up aerial views of the eruption. Climb aboard a helicopter with Gary Tuchman to view the plumes of steam, smoke, and ash from the eruption.



Larry Ferlazzo has a created a great list of resources for learning more about the volcanic eruption in Iceland.

Saturday, February 6, 2010

The Volcanoes of Yellowstone

The USGS in partnership with the University of Utah produces the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory records and publishes data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. Much of the material on the site is very scientific in nature, but the Observatory website does offer some educational materials accessible to the non-scientist. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory offers three videos about the volcanoes of Yellowstone. The Observatory also offers photographic tours of Yellowstone.

Some other good resources for learning about Yellowstone National Park can be found in Google Earth. Turn on the National Geographic and Streetview layers to some excellent images from within the park.

Applications for Education
Yellowstone National Park is known for its natural wonders. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory provides some resources for high school science teachers to use in teaching about the geology of Yellowstone.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Tour Mount Redoubt in Google Earth
Forces of Nature - Earth Science Resources
Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes

Monday, April 6, 2009

Tour Mount Redoubt in Google Earth

If you're a Geography teacher or in any other way use Google Earth in your classroom, the Google Earth Blog should be in your RSS reader. At least once a week I find something posted on the Google Earth Blog that can be incorporated into a classroom.

Today on the Google Earth Blog I found a link to a tour of Mount Redoubt in Alaska. As you probably know, Mount Redoubt recently erupted sending plumes of ash more than 50,000 feet above sea level. The Google Earth Tour of Mount Redoubt is narrated.

Staying with the volcano topic, I found a couple of other resources that might be handy for science teachers. Through Google Maps Mania I found a link to this Google Map of more than 1500 volcanoes. Each placemark on the map contains some basic information about the volcano.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory has extremely detailed information about all of the volcanoes in Alaska including Mount Redoubt. The Mount Redoubt page includes images, charts, and maps about the current volcanic activity.

Embedded below is a short video about Mount Redoubt's recent eruption.


Applications for Education
The Google Earth tour of Mount Redoubt along with the other resources listed above could be good for use in a science classroom. The video and tour of Mount Redoubt could be used at most grade levels while the Alaska Volcano Observatory is probably a resource best utilized by high school students.

A related resource that may be of interest to you is Forces of Nature Earth Science Resources. You may also want to check out Snag Films where you can watch National Geographic's Violent Earth for free.

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