Showing posts with label World War II. Show all posts
Showing posts with label World War II. Show all posts

Friday, September 16, 2022

The WWII Rumor Project - An Activity in Learning Through Primary Sources

A handful of years ago the Library of Congress launched a crowd sourcing project called By the People. The purpose of the project is to enlist the help of the public to transcribe thousands of primary source documents that are housed by and have been scanned by the Library of Congress. Over the years there have been collections of documents from the American Civil War, papers from the American Revolution, presidential papers, documents about suffrage, and documents about the integration of Major League Baseball. The latest By the People campaign is seeking help transcribing a collection of documents from the WWII Rumor Project carried out by the Office of War Information

Anyone can participate in the LOC's Crowd project to transcribe documents in the WWII Rumor Project collection of notes and diaries. To get started simply go to the collection and choose a document. Your chosen document will appear on the left side of the screen and a field for writing your transcription appears on the right side of the screen. After you have completed your transcription it is submitted for peer review. A demonstration of the process is included in the video below.

Applications for Education
The By the People project is a good opportunity for high school students and some middle school students to learn about the role of information control in the United States during World War II while contributing to a national project. All of the collections in By the People do have timelines and some other resources that help to provide context for the documents that are in need of transcription.

The Smithsonian has a similar crowdsourcing project called Smithsonian Digital Volunteers.


Wednesday, December 6, 2017

8 Good Resources for Learning About Pearl Harbor

Tomorrow is the 76th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Of course, that wasn't the first military action of the Japanese during WWII. It's just the event that finally got the U.S. to declare war.

The 1941 Project is an interactive map of Pearl Harbor. The map features the stories of survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Click on a person on the map to read his or her story and see accompanying photographs. You can customize the map to display the positions of ships on December 7, 1941. There is also an option to see the map as the Japanese had drawn it prior to the attack. The 1941 Project map does take a long time to load all of features. Remind your students to be patient while the map loads all available features.

Five Things You Don't Know About Pearl Harbor, produced by Military.com, offers five interesting facts about and related to the bombing of Pearl Harbor.



The National Parks Service offers lesson plans about Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona.

History Animated has a number of animations of military movements in the Pacific during WWII.

My Story: Pearl Harbor is an hour-by-hour account of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The account is told from the perspective of Dale and Johnie Gano who were stationed at Pearl Harbor.

Remembering Pearl Harbor is a CBS Sunday Morning segment that features interviews with Pearl Harbor attack survivors.


The Smithsonian Channel offers audio of the only live news report from Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Images have been added to the audio to create the following video.


One of my favorite online history teachers, Keith Hughes, offers this seven minute lesson about Pearl Harbor.



And as always, Larry Ferlazzo has a list of Pearl Harbor resources that I recommend reviewing.

A Multimedia Timeline of WWII in the Pacific

As any good student of history can tell you, the Pacific theater of World War II was just as complicated as the European theater. National Geographic has a multimedia timeline that can help students understand the sequence and significance of events in the Pacific theater.

World War II in the Pacific is a timeline that features dozens of events in text, image, and video form. Maps are included in many of the events to provide students with a better context in which to understand the events. The timeline begins in 1931 with Japan's occupation of Manchuria and moves through the bombing of Pearl Harbor and eventually to surrender in 1945.
This timeline was created by using Timeline JS. Timeline JS is one of the tools featured in my professional development course, Teaching History With Technology

Saturday, April 29, 2017

5 Good Resources for Teaching and Learning About World War II

This morning I went to the World War II museum in New Orleans. It is a fantastic museum. The museum does a masterful job of mixing artifacts and oral histories into the greater context of World War II. And for folks like me who are fascinated by aircraft the Boeing center is a great place to see vintage aircraft up close. In the Boeing center I stopped and recorded some photospheres in the Google Street View images app and in the Google Cardboard Camera app. The whole experience prompted me revisit some of my favorite online resources for teaching and learning about World War II.

The Science and Technology of WWII provides students and teachers with lesson plans, timelines, essays, images, and learning activities about the scientific and technological developments that took place during WWII. The darkroom section of the website contains thirteen categories of images of WWII scientific and technology developments. The timeline on the website allows students to explore the scientific, technological, and political steps in the development of the atomic bomb. The learning activities section of The Science and Technology of WWII gives students the opportunity to learn about and send coded messages.

The World at War is an interactive timeline about FDR's decisions during WWII. Click on any of the key decisions listed to learn more about those decisions. The decisions are interspersed amongst other key events of WWII. None of the event descriptions are terribly detailed, but the timeline does provide a nice general overview.

History Animated is a resource that I first started using with students in 2009. History Animated provides animations of battles of the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the US Civil War, and US Campaign in Europe in WWII, US Pacific Campaign in WWII. In each of the three series of animations you will see the animated movement of armies displayed on a map. Each animation is accompanied by captions describing the strategies of the armies as well as the results and consequences of each battle. The animations will make great supplements to classroom instruction. The animations are a significant improvement over drawing or pointing to places on a map.

The BBC's World Wars In-depth series contains some great audio, visual, animated, and text resources for learning about WWII from start to finish. WWII In-depth contains a timeline overview of the war. From there you can jump-off in a number of directions to explore details about WWII.

The Wikimedia Commons' Atlas of World War II contains dozens of maps related to World War II. Some of the maps are blank outline maps, but most are labeled. In the Atlas of World War II you will find maps of battle locations, shifts in control, and possession of territory. The collection of maps is arranged by region.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

An Interactive Map of Pearl Harbor Survivor Stories

Tomorrow marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Earlier this week I shared some resources for teaching and learning about Pearl Harbor. This afternoon through the Maps Mania blog I learned about another resource to add to that list.

The 1941 Project is an interactive map of Pearl Harbor. The map features the stories of survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Click on a person on the map to read his or her story and see accompanying photographs. You can customize the map to display the positions of ships on December 7, 1941. There is also an option to see the map as the Japanese had drawn it prior to the attack.

The 1941 Project map does take a long time to load all of features. Remind your students to be patient while the map loads all available features.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Five Things You Might Not Know About Pearl Harbor

Today is the 74th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor which drew the United States into World War II. I have previously shared a small collection of resources for teaching and learning about the attack on Pearl Harbor. Larry Ferlazzo also has a good collection of resources that you should consult. One resource that neither of our lists includes is Five Things You Don't Know About Pearl Harbor. The video, produced by Military.com, offers five interesting facts about and related to the bombing of Pearl Harbor.


Consider using one of these five tools to incorporate this video into a flipped lesson about Pearl Harbor.

Sunday, December 7, 2014

A Small Collection of Resources About Pearl Harbor

Today is the 73rd anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor which brought the U.S. into WWII. While this list is definitely last-minute for this year, you might bookmark a few of these resources for next year or later in the year when you get to WWII in your curriculum (I typically covered WWII in April in my curriculum).

National Geographic has a good resource students can explore to learn about the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Interactive Pearl Harbor Attack Map is a map and timeline accompanied by voice narration. Each stop along the timeline of the attack is accompanied by a short narrated passage. At each stop students can click on the map to read more information about that place and moment in the chronology of the attack.

My Story: Pearl Harbor is an hour-by-hour account of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The account is told from the perspective of Dale and Johnie Gano who were stationed at Pearl Harbor.

The National Parks Service offers lesson plans about Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona.

Here is a video clip of President Roosevelt giving his "Day of Infamy" speech.


SnagFilms hosts Pearl Harbor: Day of Infamy. This documentary includes interviews with 25 people who witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Friday, October 4, 2013

A Seven Minute Overview of WWII In Europe

Last month I shared History Animated which is one of my favorite resources for helping students understand the course of military actions during World War II. This morning through Open Culture I learned about a nice video that pairs well with History Animated.

WWII in Europe: Every Day is a seven minute video that depicts the changing front lines of the European Theater of World War II every day from the German invasion of Poland to the surrender of Germany. The video includes audio samples of the voices of Hilter, Mussolini, and Roosevelt.


Applications for Education
This video could be a good model for your students to follow to create their own timelapse videos about WWII's Pacific theater.

Friday, December 7, 2012

Resources for Learning About Pearl Harbor

Today is the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor which brought the U.S. into WWII. If you're a social studies teacher looking for resources for teaching about Pearl Harbor, check out the resources below.

National Geographic has a good resource students can explore to learn about the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Interactive Pearl Harbor Attack Map is a map and timeline accompanied by voice narration. Each stop along the timeline of the attack is accompanied by a short narrated passage. At each stop students can click on the map to read more information about that place and moment in the chronology of the attack.

The National Parks Service offers lesson plans about Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona.

History Animated has a number of animations of military movements in the Pacific during WWII.

Here is a video clip of President Roosevelt giving his "Day of Infamy" speech.


SnagFilms is currently hosting Pearl Harbor: Day of Infamy. This documentary includes interviews with 25 people who witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Friday, October 26, 2012

140 WWII Aircraft Discovered In Burmese Jungle

This isn't a technology story, but I think it will be of interest to history teachers and history geeks like me. This morning The Adventure Blog has a story about a British explorer who has discovered a cache of 140 Spitfires that were buried 40 feet underground during WWII. According to the story the planes are fully intact and stored in their original shipping containers. The story is that the planes were buried for safe keeping to be uncovered and used later in WWII. The war ended without the planes being used and they were forgotten about. Read the full story here.

Applications for Education
Here are some of the World War II resources that I've shared in the past:
Video - WWII Maps of Europe & North Africa
How War Stories Inspire Learning
Interactive Pearl Harbor Map
The Science and Technology of WWII

Saturday, February 25, 2012

How War Stories Inspire Learning

How War Stories Inspire Children to Learn is an interesting audio slideshow from the BBC. The presentation features Dr. Geoff Fox talking about three books and their influence on the way that children think about and learn about war. The three books Dr. Fox discusses are The Machine Gunners, War Horse, and Carrie's War. The slideshow includes archival images of WWI and WWII in England.

Applications for Education
How War Stories Inspire Children to Learn introduced me to a couple of books that I'm going to add to my reading list. Perhaps the slideshow will do the same for you and you'll want to add these books to your classroom.

Friday, August 19, 2011

360 View of Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb

360 Cities, a provider of high quality panoramic images, recently published 360 degree imagery of Hiroshima, Japan as it looked right after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on it. You can view the imagery as I've embedded it below or click here to see it full-screen on the 360 Cities website.


Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb (3 of 5) by Harbert F Austin Jr in Japan

H/T to Open Culture for the imagery. 


For more resources about atomic bombs and WWII, check out the following resources:
The Science and Technology of WWII
Nagasaki Archive
Capturing the Atom Bomb on Film
Measure the Impact of Atomic Bombs

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Snag Learning Film - Going Hollywood: The War Years

This week's Snag Learning film of the week is Going Hollywood: The War Years. Using clips of films made in Hollywood studios during World War II, Going Hollywood: The War Years explains the role of movies in shaping the American public's knowledge and opinions about WWII. You'll see clips endorsing the purchase of war bonds, endorsements for enlisting in the army, and clips encouraging viewers to support "our boys." Some of the actors and actresses appearing in these clips include Bob Hope, Gene Kelly, Katherine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, and Fred Astaire.
Watch more free documentaries
Applications for Education
For teachers of US History, this film could be a good resource for showing students the role of movies in shaping citizens' actions and attitudes during WWII. You can find discussion/ viewing questions for the film here.

Friday, April 23, 2010

10 Resources for Teaching & Learning About WWII

Next week my US History students will be beginning their studies of World War II. I spent some time this week going through some of the resources that I've used in the past and the resources that I've mentioned in the past on Free Technology for Teachers.

The event that brought the US into WWII was the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Here's a video containing President Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor Address also known as "a date that will live in infamy" speech.


Snag Films offers three films about the bombing of Pearl Harbor including this one hosted by Tom Brokaw.

The National Parks Service offers lesson plans about Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona.

Google Earth has a layer that features aerial imagery of 35 European cities bombed during WWII. Among these cities are Warsaw, Lyon, Naples, and Stuttgart. To view this imagery and compare it to modern imagery, locate a city in Google Earth then use the timeline slider to view the historical imagery.

The Science and Technology of WWII provides students and teachers with lesson plans, timelines, essays, images, and learning activities about the scientific and technological developments that took place during WWII. The darkroom section of the website contains thirteen categories of images of WWII scientific and technology developments. The timeline on the website allows students to explore the scientific, technological, and political steps in the development of the atomic bomb. The learning activities section of The Science and Technology of WWII gives students the opportunity to learn about and send coded messages.

Conflict History is a good example of what can be accomplished by mixing Google Maps with a timeline. Conflict History provides a timeline at the bottom of a Google Map. Select a range of dates on the timeline and placemarks representing conflicts appear on the map. For example, if you select the years 1941-1945, every conflict that happened around the world in those years appears on the map. For major conflicts such as World War II, individual campaigns and battles appear on the map.









The World at War is an interactive timeline about FDR's decisions during WWII. Click on any of the key decisions listed to learn more about those decisions. The decisions are interspersed amongst other key events of WWII. None of the events are terribly detailed, but the timeline does provide a nice general overview.

World War Two: Europe and North Africa 1939-1945 Map is a narrated overview of the main events in those areas. What I like about this video is that it provides visual, geographic context for the events discussed by the narrator. Watch the video below.


World War Two: Asia and the Pacific 1941-1945 Map
uses the same concept as the video above to illustrate the Pacific theater of WWII.


The BBC's World Wars In-depth series contains some great audio, visual, animated, and text resources for learning about WWII from start to finish. WWII In-depth contains a timeline overview of the war. From there you can jump-off in a number of directions to explore details about WWII.

Saturday, December 12, 2009

A Brief Timeline of FDR's WWII Decisions

Yesterday, while exploring Time's website I came across this timeline featuring the key decisions made by President Roosevelt during World War II. The World at War is an interactive timeline in which you can click on any of the key decisions listed to learn more about those decisions. The decisions interspersed amongst other key events of WWII. None of the events are terribly detailed, but the timeline does provide a nice general overview.

Applications for Education
The World at War could be a good introductory resource or review resource for US History teachers and their students. Teachers could have each student in a class select an item from the timeline to research and teach to their classmates.


Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
TimeRime Multimedia Timeline Builder
Great Timeline Builders
Timelines.com - Multimedia Timelines, Wiki-style