Showing posts with label blog post topics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label blog post topics. Show all posts

Friday, December 23, 2016

Twelve Posts from One Topic

One of the most frequently cited reasons for discontinuing a blog that I hear is "I don't have anything to write about." Said another way, "I've run out of ideas." Keeping your blog fresh does require coming up with a lot of blog posts topics.

A method that I regularly use to develop blog post topics is making lists on pieces of paper. I take one topic and try to write as many sub-topics as I can below it. Doing this often leads to the generation of ten or twelve blog posts related to one overarching topic.

The biggest source of topic ideas still remains to be my email inbox. Questions from colleagues, students, and parents are often great fodder for blog posts. I'll take the main idea from a question and split it into many sub-topics to turn into blog posts. Doing this just once a week can give you enough content to keep a classroom, library, or school blog fresh for month.

In Blogs & Social Media for Teachers & School Leaders I explain in more depth how to make your blog relevant to students and parents.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Three Ways to Make Your Blog Posts More Helpful

One of the central purposes of this blog and thousands of others on the web is to help others. Blogs that help people solve problems get a lot of return visitors. Apply that concept to your classroom, library, or school blog the next time you craft a blog post for it. If your post helps a student, a parent, or a colleague solve a problem, he or she is more likely to return to the blog in the future. Here are three things that you can do to make your blog more helpful to others.

1. Include a video. 
This could be a screencast video that you create or it could be an informative video that you found on the web. Screencast videos are particularly helpful when you're trying to show someone the steps to solving a problem.

2. Include hand-outs.
If you find that your blog post is going much past 600 words, consider making it available as a PDF that folks can download to read as a printed copy. Similarly, if you're including slides in your blog post, consider letting people download them to print and write notes on.

3. Include a chart.
This could be a pro-con chart, a flow chart, or a chart comparing similar iPad apps. Over the years I've found that people love having charts, especially ones they can download, to help them make decisions.

More ideas about improving your blog will be shared in my upcoming webinar, Winning Blog Strategies. I hope that you'll join me for it next Wednesday. 

Sunday, December 4, 2016

5 Blog Posts Your Students' Parents Will Appreciate

Posting useful, practical tips is one of the best ways to get your students' parents to frequently read your classroom blog. Coming up with those tips to write as blog posts can be challenging at times. Therefore, I'm offering you these five blog post topics that parents will appreciate.

Consider turning any or all of these blog posts into documents that you can print and send home to parents who don't visit your blog or those who might have missed your post the first time around.


1. How to supervise your child's web use at home.

2. Privacy settings on school-provided laptops/ Chromebooks/ iPads/ tablets. Consider adding screenshots or a screencast video illustrating those settings. Screencast-o-matic.com and Nimbus Screenshot are great tools for making screencast videos.

3. Tasty and healthy snacks to send to school with your child (Pinterest is a great source for ideas, just make sure you give proper attribution).

4. How to talk to kids about bullying. You might consider linking to some of these resources from Common Sense Media.

5. A glossary of Tween/ teen slang vocabulary. Consider posting this as a Google Doc that automatically updates as you update it throughout the school year (we all know how quickly Tween/teen slang evolves).

This topic and many more are covered in-depth in Blogs & Social Media for Teachers & School Leaders. Graduate credit is available for completing the course.