Showing posts with label custom maps. Show all posts
Showing posts with label custom maps. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

How to Create Custom Maps From Your Google Drive Account

 Earlier this fall Google renamed Maps Engine Lite to My Maps. My Maps is Google's service for creating custom maps. Today, My Maps was integrated into Google Drive. Now in you can create a custom map from your Google Drive account. To do this just open the "new" menu in your Google Drive account and select "My Maps." See the screenshot below for directions. Below the screenshot you will find three video tutorials on using My Maps to create custom maps.
Click image to view it in full size. 




Tuesday, October 7, 2014

How to Create a Custom Map on Wikia Maps

Wikia Maps is a map creation tool that enables you to create maps on pictures that you upload to the service. Wikia calls those maps custom maps. You can also use Wikia Maps to create maps in a manner similar to those that you may have previously created in Google Maps. Wikia calls those maps "real maps." In the video below I demonstrate how to create a custom map on Wikia Maps.



Applications for Education
My first thought when I saw the custom option in Wikia Maps was that it could be a good tool for students to use to create maps about fictional places they have read about in their favorite books. To do this students would draw a map of what they think a fictional town or fantasy world looks like then upload the drawing to Wikia Maps.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Wikia Maps - Create Online Maps on Almost Any Image

Wikia Maps is a new map creation tool from Wikia. Wikia Maps has two map creation options. You can use Wikia Maps to create maps in a manner similar to those that you may have previously created in Google Maps. Wikia calls those maps "real maps." The truly cool feature of Wikia Maps is the option to create maps on pictures that you upload. Wikia calls those maps "custom maps."

Custom maps are created in Wikia Maps by uploading a picture or selecting a picture from the Wikia Maps gallery. You could upload a picture of a historical map, a picture from a place that you visited (I'm thinking of my pictures taken from the top of the Empire State Building), or you could upload a picture of a drawing that you made. You can add map placemarks to the image that you upload to use as the basis of your custom Wikia Map.

Applications for Education
My first thought when I saw the custom option in Wikia Maps was that it could be a good tool for students to use to create maps about fictional places they have read about in their favorite books. To do this students would draw a map of what they think a fictional town or fantasy world looks like. After completing the drawing, students would take a picture of it and upload it to Wikia Maps where they can add multimedia placemarks to their maps of fictional places.

H/T to Google Maps Mania

Friday, April 19, 2013

Video - How to Add Political Boundaries in Google Map Maker

No one knows a town or neighborhood like the people that live there. Google knows that and has made Map Maker a crowd-sourcing project to create the most detailed public maps possible. Google suggests adding information about recreational areas in your town, cultural landmarks, schools, and businesses. Yesterday, thanks to Rich Kiker, I learned that Google Map Maker now allows you to add political boundaries to maps. Watch the video below to learn how to do this.


Applications for Education
Teachers looking to create a project with "real world" implications should consider having students research their communities and contribute to making the map better on Google Map Maker.

Learn more about Map Maker in the video below.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

ikiMap - More Than Just Custom Google Maps

ikiMap is a free service for creating custom maps online. The service allows you to build custom maps on top of Google Maps, Bing Maps, and Open Street Maps. You can also use a completely blank canvas and upload a map. The maps that you create on ikiMap can be shared publicly or privately. Your maps can be constructed collaboratively on ikiMap.

To create a custom map on ikiMap you do have to register on the site and confirm your registration in an email. Once you're registered you can start building a map. The simplest way to build a custom map on ikiMap is to choose a base layer and add custom placemarks. There is a collection of dozens of placemark icons to choose from. If you don't like the placemark icons in the gallery, you can upload your own icons. Each placemark can contain text, images, links, and embedded videos.

ikiMap provides easy-to-use tools for drawing shapes on your maps. I found the tools easier to use than the drawing tools on Google Maps. The ikiMap drawing tools provide for easy resizing, relocation, labeling, and color changes.


Advanced amateur cartographers may want to take advantage of ikiMap's upload feature to import data sets and KML files. Speaking of KML files, you can download your maps from ikiMap as KML files to use in other applications.

Applications for Education
ikiMap does require an email address which probably eliminates it from use in many elementary schools, but if your students do have email addresses and you're looking for an online alternative to Google Maps that offers a little more in terms of customization features, give ikiMap a try.

H/T to Google Maps Mania

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

21 Map Creation Tools for Students and Teachers

Yesterday, I published a review of MapFab which is a fabulous, free, and simple tool for creating maps  online. Writing that post got me thinking about all of the other free map creation tools that I've reviewed over the years. Google Maps and Google Earth are my favorite tools for creating maps, but not every school allows teachers and students to download it. And creating Google Maps does require you to have a Google account which is an obstacle to use in some schools too. In the list below you will find some map creation tools that don't require registration. And, of course, all of the tools on this list are free for teachers and students to use.

Animaps is a service that was built for the purpose of allowing users to create animated Google Maps. The basics of creating maps in Animaps is very similar the process for creating maps in Google Maps. The main benefit of using Animaps over Google Maps is that you can create a tour of your placemarks that plays through according to the timing that you specify. Another benefit is that you can build in colored shapes to expand and contract to demonstrate patterns. You can also import images to your map from Flickr, Picassa, and Facebook. Click here to watch a demonstration of Animaps in action. You do not need a Google Account to use Animaps, you can register on the site or use Facebook credentials to log-in.

Tripline is a service designed to enable anyone to record a trip they've taken or to plan a trip itinerary. What Tripline is really intended to do is to give you a platform to "present" your trips to others. To do this Tripline allows you to add details to each stop on your itinerary, add images, and add music to the presentation of your trip. When completed your map essentially becomes a slideshow tour. There are a few different ways that you can create trip on Tripline. You can use your mobile device to check-in at different locations and have Tripline plot those points for you. You can do that using Foursquare or by geolocating your Tweets. The other way that you can create trips on Tripline is to plot them directly on the Tripline site.

Build A Map is a service that allows you to build layers on top of Google Maps. This is different than creating maps in the "My Places" feature of Google Maps. In My Places you can only add placemarks, paths, and shaded shapes. Using Build A Map you can add information from data sets, add shapes, and add custom labels. The service is currently in a private beta so you do have to register your email address and wait for an invitation to try it out. In the meantime you can watch the following video overview of the service.


Scribble Maps is a fun and useful application for drawing and typing on Google Maps. Using Scribble Maps anyone can draw and type on a map. All of the zoom options and most of the search options available on Google Maps are available when using Scribble Maps. You can zoom in on an area and then type text, draw a circle or a box around an area, you can even doodle stick figures or whatever you like on your map. Maps created by using Scribble Maps can be shared via email or embedded into your website. Scribble Maps Pro (an upgrade that requires a payment) allows you to import KML files, import spreadsheets, and import SHP files. Importing KML files allows you to add free-hand drawings on top of files that you may have already created for Google Maps or Google Earth. Importing spreadsheets makes it easy to quickly add placemarks to a large number of places. SHP file importation allows you to add custom shapes to your maps.

Quikmaps is a nice map creation tool that allows you to quickly draw, type, and insert icons on a Google Map without requiring you to have a Google Account. You can register directly on the site itself. Quikmaps is similar to Scribble Maps. Placing icons on Quikmaps is a simple matter of dragging and dropping elements. Maps can be shared via email or embedded into your blog or website.

UMapper is a custom map creation tool that allows you to create maps from just about any JPG, PNG, or GIF file. Using UMapper is a simple process of uploading an image and selecting a map service (Google, Yahoo, Bing) as the basis for the map. The finished maps can be embedded into your blog or website. UMapper also offers a platform for creating your own geography game. UMapper GeoDart is a simple game in which players have to locate the places the you specify.

Historypin allows anyone with a Google account to place images within the setting of current Google Maps Streetview imagery. If you don't have images to add, you can simply explore the imagery added by others. To explore the imagery on Historypin, zoom in on a location then select a range of dates on the Historypin timeline.

Mapfaire is a free tool for quickly creating maps that contain simple placemarks. Using Mapfaire you can create a custom map that highlights places you specify. To use Mapfaire just sign in with your Google Account then name your map and start adding placemarks. To add a placemark all you need to do is enter a location then label your placemark. You can publish and edit your maps at any time.

QuizGeo is a site that hosts geography quizzes built on the Google Maps platform. On QuizGeo you can browse and play pre-made geography quizzes or create your own quizzes. All of the quizzes operate in the same fashion of presenting you with a place name and requiring you to click on that place on a map before time expires. To create your own games you need to register on QuizGeo. After registering, creating your quiz is easy to do. To create a quiz just name it, click submit, then click "add questions." To add questions just enter a place or address in the search box then outline that place using the pointer provided and click "save question." You can add as many places to your quiz as you like.

Target Map is a service that allows anyone to create mapped displays of data sets. Users of Target Map can importa and map their own data sets, use data sets from other users, use data sets found online, or manually input data onto a map. When I created my sample map, I choose to manually input data. Target Map allows you to map data for a country, a region, or for the whole world. You can customize the display to make borders appear faint or bold and alter the look of data points. Although at first glance Target Map's user interface might not appear to be terribly intuitive, it is actually quite easy to use if you follow the directions. Target Map is free to use if you agree to publish your maps to the public gallery. If you want to keep your maps private you can do so for a small fee. The first time you create a map on Target Map it is reviewed for quality before it is added to the public gallery.

World Map is a free program developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University. World Map is designed to enable creation, visualization, and exploration of geographically referenced information. In other words, you can build some great mapped data visualizations on the service. To create a map on World Map you can use the more than 1800 data sets that are stored in the service or you can upload your own data sets. The majority of the data sets in the World Map library have abstracts explaining a bit about the purpose and scope of the data. There are five default base maps that you can choose to build upon. Alternatively, you can choose to create your map completely from scratch and upload your own base layer to build upon. Maps that you create on World Map can be embedded into a website, printed, or viewed in Google Earth.

The UN Stat Planet Map allows you to create useful mapped displays of UN development indicators data. There are ten data categories from which you can choose. Within each category there are further refinements possible. You can customize the map to present sharper contrasts between the data indicators, change the indicator symbols, and alter the map legend. To visual the change in data over time, use the time slider at the bottom of the map. Your maps and the data that they represent can be downloaded as PNG and JPEG files for printing.

GeoCommons provides excellent tools for creating and sharing map-based data visualizations. Users can select a from twelve base maps to build upon. After choosing a base map users can select from more than 49,000 public data sets or upload their own data sets. Map creators can add more than one data set to their maps. To complete the visualizations users can specify colors, shades, shapes, and apply numerous filters to determine what is or is not displayed from their chosen data sets. Completed maps can be shared as KML files or embedded into blogs and websites.

Map a List turns Google Spreadsheet information into Google Maps placemarks. The finished product is a Google Map of the information you've selected from your Google Spreadsheets. To create a map from your spreadsheets you need to register for a Map a List account and give it access to your Google Docs account. Map a List then walks you through each step of selecting a spreadsheet, defining the parameters for your map, and choosing placemarks. Just like in Google Maps you can customize the placemark icons that are used in your Map a List displays. Your maps can be shared publicly or privately. Your maps can be downloaded as KML files to use in Google Earth.

Spreadsheet Mapper 3 is a Google spreadsheet script that allows you to create a map of up to 1,000 placemarks based on your spreadsheet data. And because Spreadsheet Mapper 3 is a part of Google Docs you can share your spreadsheets and maps for collaborative editing. Click here for complete directions on how to use Spreadsheet Mapper 3.

Heat Map Tool is a tool for easily creating heat maps or incident maps from a CSV file. To create a heat map all you need to do is upload a CSV file then specify your desired display attributes like scale, colors, and opacity. You can edit the display attributes of your map whenever you like. If you're wondering how to create a CSV file you can do so by exporting from a spreadsheet in Google Documents or exporting from an Excel file. Click here for directions on exporting from Excel. The free version of Heat Map Tool allows you to have up to 100 data points on your map and up to 500 hits per day on your map.

GmapGIS is a free tool for marking and drawing on maps without having to create or use a Google account. GmapGIS provides tools for drawing lines and shapes, adding markers, adding labels, and measuring distances. To get started just visit GmapGIS and select the drawing or labeling tools that you want to use. When you are finished drawing on and labeling you can share your map by sending the link that is automatically generated for your map. You can also save a KML file for your map and view it in Google Earth.

MapFab is an excellent free map creation tool built on top of Google Maps. MapFab offers a few advantages over Google Maps, but the most notable advantage is that you do not have to create an account in order to create your custom maps. To start creating custom maps on MapFab just head to the site and enter your starting location. Then select from the menu of custom placemarks and enter a description. There is a variety of font colors to choose from when you label your placemarks. That same variety of text colors can be applied to your map title too. Just like on Google Maps you can draw polygons and circles on your maps. Also like on Google Maps you can draw lines, but on MapFab you can change the colors of your lines.

Meograph is a digital storytelling tool that provides tools for creating map-based and timeline-based narrated stories. Meograph is still in a closed beta, but they appear to be very interested in the possible educational uses of the service. When you watch a Meograph story (click here to watch one about women's rights in the USA) you will notice that it is very similar to a watching a narrated Google Earth tour. That is because it is based on the Google Maps and the Google Earth browser plug-in. As the story plays you can stop it to explore additional content in the forms of videos, texts, and images.

Friday, May 4, 2012

Use Map a List for a Classroom Genealogy Project

Map a List turns Google Spreadsheet information into Google Maps placemarks. The finished product is a Google Map of the information you've selected from your Google Spreadsheets.

To create a map from your spreadsheets you need to register for a Map a List account and give it access to your Google Docs account. Map a List then walks you through each step of selecting a spreadsheet, defining the parameters for your map, and choosing placemarks. Just like in Google Maps you can customize the placemark icons that are used in your Map a List displays. Your maps can be shared publicly or privately. Your maps can be downloaded as KML files to use in Google Earth.

Applications for Education
Map a List could be a neat tool to use for a classroom genealogy project. Create a spreadsheet form into which students enter information about where their ancestors came from. Students could enter the information themselves or they could share the link to the form and ask their parents or grandparents to fill in some information Then use Map a List to show the distribution of ancestries of the students in your classroom.

Monday, April 30, 2012

UNDP Development Data Interactive Map

Over the weekend through Noel Jenkins I learned about a neat interactive map from the UNDP. The UN Stat Planet Map allows you to create useful mapped displays of UN development indicators data. There are ten data categories from which you can choose. Within each category there are further refinements possible. You can customize the map to present sharper contrasts between the data indicators, change the indicator symbols, and alter the map legend. To visual the change in data over time, use the time slider at the bottom of the map. Your maps and the data that they represent can be downloaded as PNG and JPEG files for printing.

Applications for Education
Simply looking at data spreadsheets or graphs reveal some good development data to students. But for better visual comparisons tied to locations, the UN Stat Planet Map is useful.

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Seven Tools for Creating Data Visualizations

This morning I received an email asking me for some tools for creating data visualizations. Here are seven tools that students can use to build data visualizations.

Better World Flux is a free data visualization development tool that was created for the World Bank's Apps for Development Challenge. The purpose of the challenge was to encourage app developers to create products that could be used to highlight the development data hosted by the World BankBetter World Flux allows users to create animated visualizations of development data. To use Better World Flux (no registration required) all you have to do is select a data set from the menu provided and select a country or countries from the menu provided. From there Better World Flux creates an animated data visualization for you. The visualization will change as the years on the timeline at the bottom of the visualization change. This way users can see growth and recession of a statistic over time.
Learn more about Better World Flux in the video below.


Target Map is a service that allows anyone to create mapped displays of data sets. Users of Target Map can importa and map their own data sets, use data sets from other users, use data sets found online, or manually input data onto a map. When I created my sample map, I choose to manually input data. Target Map allows you to map data for a country, a region, or for the whole world. You can customize the display to make borders appear faint or bold and alter the look of data points. Although at first glance Target Map's user interface might not appear to be terribly intuitive, it is actually quite easy to use if you follow the directions. Target Map is free to use if you agree to publish your maps to the public gallery. If you want to keep your maps private you can do so for a small fee. The first time you create a map on Target Map it is reviewed for quality before it is added to the public gallery.

Many Eyes is an online data visualization tool developed by IBM. Many Eyes provides tools for creating a wide variety of data visualizations using your data sets or data sets hosted by IBM. If you're not interested in creating visualizations but just want to explore the visualizations created by others, you can do that on Many Eyes too. The video below offers an overview of creating data visualizations with Many Eyes.



Gapminder is a great tool for creating data visualizations. Gapminder gives users the ability to create graphs of hundreds of demographic and economic indicators. I like Gapminder because it provides a good way for visual learners to see data sets in a context that is significantly different from standard data sets. Gapminder has a page for educators on which they can find thematic animations, graphs, quizzes, model lessons, and a PDF guide to using Gapminder. For teachers working in schools with slow Internet connections or very strict filtering, Gapminder has a desktop application that you can download and install for Mac or Windows computers. The video below demonstrates Gapminder desktop.


Google's Public Data Explorer draws on data sets from the World Bank, the US CDC, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, and other sources of public data. In all there are eighty data sets. The Public Data Explorer makes it possible to quickly create visual representations and visual comparisons of the data sets. Each visualization you create has a unique url that you can direct people to or you can embed the visualization in a blog or website. You can use your own data in the Public Data Explorer but to do this you need to use the Data Set Publishing Language (DSPL) developed by Google. The process of upload data in the DSPL format isn't something you'll learn in minutes, but if you're really interested in doing it Google does have a step-by-step tutorial for you to follow.


Map a List is a free tool that you can use to turn Google Spreadsheet information into Google Maps placemarks. To create a map from your spreadsheets you need to register for a Map a List account and give it access to your Google Docs account. Map a List then walks you through each step of selecting a spreadsheet, defining the parameters for your map, and choosing placemarks. Within Google Spreadsheets there are many "Gadgets" that can be used to create visualizations of data. To explore the gadgets that will work with your data, go to the "insert" drop-down menu then select "gadgets."

World Map is a free program developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University. World Map is designed to enable creation, visualization, and exploration of geographically referenced information. In other words, you can build some great mapped data visualizations on the service.

To create a map on World Map you can use the more than 1800 data sets that are stored in the service or you can upload your own data sets. The majority of the data sets in the World Map library have abstracts explaining a bit about the purpose and scope of the data. There are five default base maps that you can choose to build upon. Alternatively, you can choose to create your map completely from scratch and upload your own base layer to build upon. Maps that you create on World Map can be embedded into a website, printed, or viewed in Google Earth.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Population, Landscape, and Climate Maps

The Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center publishes data sets and maps designed to blend the studies of socioeconomics and Earth science. One of the results of that work is the creation of some interesting mapped visualizations of data sets. Some of the more interesting maps illustrate correlations between climate zone and population density. All of the maps can be downloaded and printed for free use in your classroom. The data sets behind the maps are also freely available for classroom use.

I've embedded below a zoomable (if that's a word) image of one of the maps from the collection. I used Zoom.it to make the map zoomable.



Applications for Education
Maps can be a social studies teacher's best friend. But they can also be useful for science teachers and math teachers who wish to have their students take information from data sets and transform it into something new. These maps could provide a model for a project in which your students collect local data and display it on a map.

Friday, October 28, 2011

Add Custom Maps to Your Android Phone

Here's a neat application that I stumbled upon this afternoon. Custom Maps for Android allows you to use .jpeg and .png images of any map to create a custom GPS map. To use the app add an image to your phone then specify two or more latitude and longitude points that are common to your map image and to Google Maps. The Custom Maps application will then allow you to find the distance between where you are and a point on your custom map. You can also use the your custom map without a GPS signal, but it does lose some functionality. You can find the tutorials for using Custom Maps for Android here.

Applications for Education
We have some walking trails connecting the middle school and high school in my district. These trails are used for cross country running, skiing, and snow shoeing during physical education classes. Because the trails are so wooded, they don't appear on Google Maps. It might be a neat project for the students in my district or districts like mine to create custom maps that could be used by other students, teachers, and community members utilizing the walking trails in town.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Build A Map - Create Layered Google Maps

Build A Map is a new service that allows you to build layers on top of Google Maps. This is different than creating maps in the "My Places" feature of Google Maps. In My Places you can only add placemarks, paths, and shaded shapes. Using Build A Map you can add information from data sets, add shapes, and add custom labels. The service is currently in a private beta so you do have to register your email address and wait for an invitation to try it out. In the meantime you can watch the following video overview of the service.



Applications for Education
Build A Map reminds me a bit of Scribble Maps which also enables the construction of layered Google Maps. While you can do all of the layering features of Build A Map or Scribble Maps in Google Earth, not all teachers and students have access to Google Earth for various reasons. Or if you're in a school like mine that has a 1:1 netbook program Google Earth might not run as well as it should. In those cases Build A Map or Scribble Maps is a great alternative for developing layered maps.

H/T to Google Maps Mania.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Food Environment Atlas and Food Desert Atlas

Yesterday, I wrote a post about Oxfam's Food Price Pressure Points Map. Through a comment on that post made by Amy Young-Buckler I learned about two related maps that might be of interest to you.

The USDA's Food Desert Locator is a map of food deserts in the United States. The map shows the counties in the US in which a substantial number of people in that area have low access to a large grocery store or supermarket. Click here to read the USDA's definitions of low access and low income areas. You can click on the placemarks on the Food Desert Locator to open information about that food desert.

The USDA's Food Environment Atlas is an interactive map that you can use to visualize many different data sets related to food prices, food access, health statistics, and socio-economic characteristics related to food in the United States. Select one or more data sets from the menus to create a map.

Applications for Education
Both the Food Environment Atlas and the Food Desert Locator could be used in a similar manner to the Oxfam map for creating lessons on nutrition, environment, geography, and agriculture. Have students investigate the causes of food deserts then develop and propose their own solutions to the causes.

Friday, October 1, 2010

Show World - Infographic Maps

Show World is an interactive mapping website that takes demographic, economic, environmental, and political data sets and creates maps based on those data. This can be done with Google Earth and Google Maps before, but Show World is slightly different. Each time you select a different data set, the size of each country increases or decreases in comparison to other countries. For example, if you select the data set about steel production, the size of China is huge relative to African countries. On the other hand, if you select the data set for students not in school, the African countries swell while China decreases in size.

The maps generated by Show World can be downloaded. You can also embed the animated maps into your blog. To get the embed code you do have to submit your email address.


Applications for Education
Show World is a great way for students to visually interpret data sets. Having students explore the data sets and watch the size of the countries change could be a good discussion starting activity. Exploring the data sets on Show World could also be the starting point for research about the economic and social conditions of countries around the world.

Monday, June 21, 2010

TimeMaps - A Journey Through History

TimeMaps is best described as a mash-up of encyclopedia, timeline, and map elements. TimeMaps' world map is designed as an overview of the development of the world's societies. The map's timeline begins in 3500BC and concludes in 2005AD. Click on the timeline's icons or on the map's icons to learn more about each place represented on the map. The map changes as you progress through the timeline. For example, the 3500BC map represents only five places while the 1871AD map highlights places all over the globe.










Applications for Education
The information provided by TimeMaps is typical of the information you might find in an encyclopedia for elementary or middle school students. The appeal of the TimeMaps is that students can see where the places they're reading about are in global context. For example, if students look at the map in the 1400's they might better understand why Europeans thought they were discovering a new world in 1492 and beyond.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms
Maps of War - Animated Thematic Maps
4 Ways to View the World in Panoramic

Measure the Impact of Asteroids & Atomic Bombs

Carlos Labs, a data architecture and data integration firm in Australia, has developed two Google Maps-based widgets that demonstrate the range of atomic weapons and the size of areas that could be affected by asteroid impacts.

Ground Zero shows the size of an area that would be affected by the impact of an asteroid or the detonation of an atomic bomb. Type a city name into the Ground Zero widget to see a representation of the size of the area affected by an atomic bomb or asteroid impact.

Missile Range Map Tool is a widget that shows the range of various weapons. Select a weapon from the list then Missile Range Map Tool will show the range of that weapon.

Both the Ground Zero and Missile Range Map Tool are widgets that can be embedded into your blog or website. I've embedded the Ground Zero widget below.


H/T to Instructify for the Ground Zero widget.

Applications for Education
One of the challenges history teachers face when explaining the impact of Harry Truman's WWII decision to drop atomic bombs on Japan is getting students to understand the gravity of Truman's decision. The Ground Zero widget allows teachers to move the bomb over a familiar location so that students can better visualize the impact of atomic bombs.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
10 Resources for Teaching and Learning About WWII
National Atlas Map Maker
Atlas of World War II

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Make Your Own Weather Maps with UMapper

UMapper is a neat map creation tool that I reviewed back in October. At the time of that review the service was promising, but buggy. I looked at it again today after reading about a new feature they're offering. The new feature allows you to quickly create your own custom weather maps. I gave it a try and discovered that since my last review of UMapper the usability has improved significantly. Creating my weather map with UMapper was a simple matter of choosing a map, highlighting an area of the map, and clicking publish. Real-time weather data is automatically inserted into the map when the "weather map" template is selected. The maps you create with UMapper can be embedded into your blog or website. The video below offers a quick tutorial on how to create your own weather map.


Applications for Education
One of UMapper's other templates is GeoDart. UMapper GeoDart could be a good way for your students to create a geography game for learning to locate countries, states, and capitals.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
A Visual Guide to Global Trends
MapTrot - Easily Create and Share Maps
Quikmaps - Quickly Customize a Google Map