Showing posts with label digital literacy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label digital literacy. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

See What's Behind Any Webpage With Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles

One of the topics that we talked about during the Practical Ed Tech Summer Camp was digital literacy and critical thinking. To that end, I presented Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles as a tool that can be used to create a modified version of real news story from legitimate sources. Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles lets you see the code behind any web page and change that code to display anything that you want in place of the original text and images. After you have made the changes you can publish a local copy of the web page.

Watch the following video that I created to learn how to use Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles.



Applications for Education
Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles provides a good way for students to see how the code of a webpage works.

As I mentioned in the video, you could use X-Ray Goggles to alter an article on the web to make it a satire story. Then print the page and give it to your students to try to identify the satire elements of the story.

Saturday, May 25, 2019

Three Good Resources to Help Students Become Discerning News Consumers

Earlier this week TED-Ed published a new lesson titled Can You Spot the Problem With These Headlines? The short video lesson walks students through dissecting a couple of hypothetical news headlines. By watching the video students can begin to understand how headlines are written to entice readers and how misleading headlines are created.


Here are a couple of other resources that I've previously featured for helping students learn to discern the information that they find online and in other media.

Factitious
Factitious is a game for testing your skill at identifying fake and misleading news stories. The game was developed by the American University Game Lab and the American University's School of Communication. To play Factitious simply go to the site and select quick start. You'll then see an article appear on the screen. Read through the article, click the source listed at the bottom, and then select either the green check mark or red X to indicate whether or not you think the article is a real news story. After you make your selection you'll get instant feedback and an explanation of how you can tell if the article was a real or fake news story.

Checkology
Checkology is a service that is designed to help students develop those skills. Checkology's free version offers four interactive modules for students to complete. Each of the modules is comprised of between twenty and forty-seven instructional video clips and interactive comprehension checks. The four modules are titled Info Zones, Democracy's Watchdog, Practicing Quality Journalism, and Misinformation. As you might expect, the contents of the modules gets progressively more difficult as each section is completed.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Get Creative Commons Savvy With These Activities

Yesterday, I shared the EFF's lesson plans for teaching copyright. After using those plans you may want to move your students on to understanding Creative Commons. Peer 2 Peer University hosts a four module unit called Get CC Savvy. Each module contains a short video about the topic followed by a suggested activity to complete to help students understand Creative Commons in practice.

Applications for Education
Get CC Savvy from P2PU could be an excellent resource for any high school or college student to use on his or her own to gain an understanding of what Creative Commons licensing means in practice. Don't overlook the discussions that accompany the activities as the comments there add value to the exercises suggested by Get CC Savvy.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

5 Good Lesson Plans for Teaching Copyright

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has published a set of comprehensive lesson plans about copyright simply titled Teaching Copyright. Teaching Copyright contains five lesson plans. Each lesson plan includes printable worksheets, readings, and suggested activities. For teachers looking for a little more information than is available in the lesson plans, the EFF has a good list of additional resources including videos on the topics of copyright and fair use. To stay up to date on new developments in copyright and fair use, you may want to follow the EFF blog.

Applications for Education
Copyright can be a confusing topic for adults as well as children. The EFF's Teaching Copyright lesson plans provide teachers with the materials and resources needed for teaching appropriate use of copyrighted materials.