Showing posts with label digital notes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label digital notes. Show all posts

Monday, June 11, 2018

Three Ways to Digitize Your Physical Sticky Notes

Last week Padlet added a new feature to their free iPad and iPhone apps. That feature is the ability to snap a picture of a set of physical sticky notes then have those notes appear on a Padlet wall that you can manipulate in the app and or in your web browser. If you haven't tried it yet take a look at Kathi Kersznowski's demo video. (By the way, Padlet says the Android version of this will be available in a month).


Padlet isn't the first to offer this kind of sticky note digitization capability. Post-it has offered it in their free iOS app for the last four years. The Post-it Plus app lets you snap a picture of a set of Post-it (or other sticky notes) and then manipulate those notes in the app.


While not designed specifically for digitizing sticky notes, Microsoft's Office Lens apps will convert notes written on paper into digital notes that you can edit. You can use the digitized notes in OneNote, Word, and PowerPoint. Get the Android version here and the get the iOS version here.

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Ten Types of Notes You Can Add to Padlet Walls

As I wrote yesterday, this week Padlet added a new feature to their iPad and iPhone app. The new feature is called Catscan. Catscan lets you scan a set of physical sticky notes and have those notes digitized and displayed on a Padlet wall. Catscan is one of many ways that you can add notes to a Padlet wall. In all there are now at least ten types of notes that you can add to a Padlet wall. Nine of them are featured in the following video. The tenth is the new Catscan option.


Ten types of notes that can be added to Padlet.
  • Text
  • Hyperlinks
  • File upload
  • Video recorded with webcam/ mobile phone camera.
  • Audio recorded directly on Padlet.
  • Scribble/ free hand drawing on Padlet.
  • Pictures taken with webcam/ mobile phone camera.
  • Google Search to add image, video, GIF, or link. 
  • Google Map.
  • Digitized version of physical sticky note (Catscan mode).
Bonus Items:
If you enable these options, you can comment and or vote on the notes added to a Padlet wall. 

Friday, June 8, 2018

Turn a Set of Physical Sticky Notes Into Digital Ones With Padlet's Catscan

Padlet has added a new feature called Catscan to their iPhone and iPad apps. Catscan's purpose is to let you take a picture of a set of physical sticky notes and then have those notes appear as individual notes on a Padlet wall. Once those notes are on your Padlet wall you'll be able to move them around and interact with them just like notes that you manually add to any other Padlet wall.

Catscan is a beta feature of the Padlet iOS apps so don't expect it to work perfectly right away. If you have physical stickies that are overlapping, Catscan will have trouble differentiating between them.

Applications for Education
If you lead group brainstorming sessions or gallery walks in which you have students place sticky notes on a board, Padlet's Catscan feature could provide you with a way to digitize and reuse those notes. Share the wall that the notes are added to and your students can help sort them and or add more ideas to the fall in the form of digital notes.

Watch this video for more ideas about adding notes to Padlet walls.


Friday, April 6, 2018

How to Find & Make OneNote Templates

The more that I use it, the more I think that OneNote is a fantastic all-in-one product for note-taking, bookmarking, and general organization of your digital life. Like any robust product, OneNote has some features that you might overlook unless someone points them out. In my case, templates were a feature that I didn't notice until I had been using OneNote for a while. If you've been overlooking templates too, watch my short video to see how to find and how to make your own OneNote templates.


Applications for Education
OneNote's note-taking templates could help students streamline and organize the manner in which they take notes. If you have a structure that you prefer your students to us, create a template and share it with them. What I really like about OneNote is that you could create a note-taking template that allows your students to follow a structure, use handwriting, and then have handwriting converted to text (provided the student writes legibly).

Sunday, August 26, 2012

7 Mobile Apps Students Can Use to Never Lose Handwritten Notes Again

A couple of weeks ago on my Android blog I wrote about using the Google Drive app to create digital archives of handwritten notes. That post was prompted by a conversation that I had with a young lady entering her senior year at a high school in Rockingham County, North Carolina. That young lady explained to me that she preferred the act of handwriting her notes and outlines to typing them out on a keyboard. In a lot of ways I agreed with her because when I plan my keynote talks I always use pencil and scratch paper before creating and arranging slides. Try one or all of these seven apps ff you have students that prefer to handwrite their notes or if you prefer to handwrite your notes, but you're worried about those notes getting lost.

InClass is a free iPhone and iPad app that could be a very useful tool for students carrying those devices. InClass provides students with tools for taking text, audio, and video notes. Students can also use the app to take pictures of hand-outs, slides, and other valuable information that they see in class.
SugarSync is a cloud storage service that offers apps for iOS and Android. Using the apps you can take pictures of anything including those handwritten notes and upload them to your account. SugarSync synchronizes your files across all of your devices so that you can access your files anytime you are connected to the web.

Evernote is the service that I've been to store all of my bookmarks for the last year. I also use Evernote to create notes for myself. Sometimes I type the notes, sometimes I dictate notes into Evernote, and sometimes I just snap a picture and upload it to my account. Whichever method I choose, my notes are synched across all of my devices whenever they connect to the Internet. Evernote has apps for iOS and Android.

Skitch, which was bought by Evernote late last year, is designed for creating sketches and marking-up images. Using Skitch students can snap a picture of outlines they wrote by hand then circle or highlight the most important aspects. Skitch is available for iPad and Android.

With Google Drive installed on an Android device students can take a picture of anything and instantly upload it to their Google Drive accounts. Once the image is uploaded it can be accessed from any Internet-connected device.  Students  can write and highlight in their notebooks, but can also back-up those physical notebooks and access them online when they need to.

Dropbox is a cloud storage service that I've written about a handful of times in the past because for two years I used it in conjunction with DropItToMe to collect my students' work. Dropbox for Android and iOS has an auto-upload feature that you could use to upload images of handwritten notes.


Box, like its similarly named competitor above, is an online storage service that you can use to store, sync, and share all kinds of files. The Box mobile apps are available for iOS, Android, and Windows mobile devices. The mobile apps have an image import option that you could use to upload images of hand-outs and notes. 

Friday, April 6, 2012

mySchoolNotebook - Organize Your Notes and More

mySchoolNotebook is a new service for taking, saving, and sharing notes online and offline. The basic purpose of mySchoolNotebook is to provide a place that students can take and organize notes from all of their courses. Students can create notebooks for each of their courses to which they add text and image notes.

To use mySchoolNotebook you do have to have a Facebook account. By signing into mySchoolNotebook with a Facebook account students are able to connect with and share notebooks with their friends taking the same courses that they are taking.

mySchoolNotebook is available to use on the web and as an iPhone/iPad app. Students can export their notebooks as PDFs if they need to have a paper copy of their notes.

Applications for Education
While I appreciate what mySchoolNotebook is trying to do by requiring a Facebook account to log-in, I do think that it will be a deterrent to some students and teachers. That said, the concept of mySchoolNotebook is solid and it has the potential to be a great place for students to record, organize, and share course notes.

Monday, April 2, 2012

Fetchnotes - Type, Text, and Tag Notes for Yourself

Fetchnotes is a new service for creating and keeping notes online. You can add notes to your Fetchnotes account by typing them on the web or by sending a text message to your Fetchnotes account. Organizing your notes is quite simple. When you write a note, just use a hashtag to label your note. Then whenever you want to search for a note just enter a hashtag. For example, if I was a student taking notes in a history course I might use the hashtag "#revolution" for all notes related to revolutions. Then I could go back and read all of my notes about revolution by just searching for that hashtag.

Applications for Education
Fetchnotes doesn't offer a lot of bells and whistles, but it is good for simple recording of notes. The service is still in beta. One of the features they're promising for the future is group notes which could be quite handy for classroom use. You could have all of your students contribute to a set of group notes by using the same hashtag when they write notes.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Create Study Materials from Evernote Notes

Ever since Google Bookmarks stopped supporting lists last fall, I have used Evernote almost exclusively for all of my bookmarks and notes. Recently, while exploring some the many features of Evernote, I discovered that you can create flashcards from the contents of an Evernote notebook.

StudyBlue, a flashcard service that I covered last week, allows you to pull your notes from Evernote into its service to create flashcards. You can pull in just one notebook from Evernote or pull in multiple notebooks. One you've imported your notebooks you can copy and paste from your any of your notes to create flashcards. If you have images and links you can include those in your flashcards too. Click here or here to get started importing Evernote content into StudyBlue.

Applications for Education
I've said it before and I'll say it again, flashcards are a very basic study method for very basic information. Yet flipping through flashcards remains a popular way for students to review information. By using StudyBlue students can access their review materials from any Internet-connected device. And by using Evernote to record notes, students can access those notes and create flashcards from any Internet-connected device.

Friday, November 18, 2011

Catch - Capture and Share Notes Anywhere

Catch is a service that allows you to create bookmarks, text notes, voice notes, and images anytime you're on the web. Catch offers browser extensions for Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer. You can also use Catch on Android and iOS devices to save notes. You can find the Android and iOS apps here. Notes that you save to your Catch account can be just a simple link, a link with a note, an image that you capture on your phone, or voice message.

This week Catch announced a new feature called Catch Streams. Streams are collaborative sets of links and notes. With a free account you can establish up to three Streams. In each Stream you and your team can build collections of resources, brainstorm by sharing notes, and keep track of goals you've set.

Applications for Education
I often get ideas for a lesson while not near a computer. Services like Catch allow me to capture those ideas on my phone. Later when I get to a computer I'll expand upon my idea. Students who work the same way, might find Catch to be a handy tool for capturing their ideas whenever they get them. Catch Streams will enable those same students working on group research projects to collaboratively brainstorm and build resources lists.

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Notes.io - Quickly Take and Share Notes

Notes.io is a new service that offers a simple platform for taking and sharing notes. To use Notes.io just go to the site and start typing your notes. When you want to share your notes just click "short" to have a shortened url created for sharing on Twitter, Facebook, or wherever else you like. It really couldn't be any simpler to use. And while not available yet, they do have plans for enabling file attachments and enabling a printer friendly option.

Applications for Education
Notes.io could be a nice tool for students to use to quickly record and share ideas with each other. If the file attachment option becomes a reality it could make it easy to share documents with each other too.