Showing posts with label google forms. Show all posts
Showing posts with label google forms. Show all posts

Monday, January 17, 2022

Five Uses for QR Codes in School Settings

Over the weekend I shared a neat QR code generator called QRToon that lets you create a QR code that includes a cartoon version of yourself in it. Writing that post got me thinking about how far QR codes have come since I first saw them while working for Roadway Package Systems (now called FedEx Ground) in the late 90's. As a package handler and later as a dock coordinator, I hated QR codes because the tiniest smudge and made the code nearly impossible to scan with the big, clunky scanners we had. And generating the QR code labels seemed to take forever. Fast-forward a quarter century and QR codes are easy to make and easy to scan on mobile phones. 

Five Uses for QR Codes in School Settings
Now that QR codes are easy to make and easy to scan with mobile phones and tablets, they can be helpful in accomplishing a lot things in school settings. Here's a short list of ways to consider using QR codes in your school. 
  • Share sign-in/sign-out sheets via QR code. If you're using Google Forms or Microsoft Forms to maintain sign-in/sign-out sheets, post a QR code on the wall of the room to be signed into or out of to make it easy for students or colleagues to access those forms. Here's a demonstration of using QR Code Monkey for that purpose. 

  • Share links to important and frequently updated webpages like the school lunch menu. Last year the daily lunch menu was plastered all over my school in the form of a QR code that students could scan to get the day's menu and place orders in advance. One of the easiest ways to make a QR code for that purpose is to use the QR code generator that is built into Google Chrome. Here's a demo how that works

  • Create QR codes to access voice messages. With the Mote Chrome extension installed you can simply click the Mote icon to record voice notes. When you're done speaking simply click the share button and you'll have an option to view and download a QR code. Anyone who scans your QR code will be able to listen to your voice recording. Watch this short video to learn how you can share voice notes via Mote QR codes.  

  • QR codes can be useful for distributing important contact information to parents and students. QR Code Monkey lets you not only create QR codes for URLs, but also create QR codes to distribute contact information like phone numbers and email addresses. 

  • I forget which school I that I first saw it in, but a handful of years ago I visited a school library in which there was a selection of books that had QR codes inside the dust jacket. The QR codes linked to book trailer videos that students had made about those books. 

How to Make QR Codes
I've linked to a few tutorials above. I'm also listing them below for easier access.

Create QR Codes With QR Code Monkey



Create QR Codes With QRToon



Create QR Codes With Google Chrome

Wednesday, December 29, 2021

Best of 2021 - Save Google Forms Progress

As I do every year, I'm taking this week as a break from publishing new blog posts and will be republishing some of the most popular posts of the year. Here's one from August. 

This week Google finally added a feature to Google Forms that teachers and students have requested for years. You can now save your work in progress when answering questions in Google Forms!

Google Forms will now save students' work in progress when they are completing a quiz or any other Google Form that you give to them through Google Classroom. The only thing that students have to do to have their work saved in progress is make sure that they are signed into their Google accounts. That shouldn't be too hard to remember if the students have accessed the form through Google Classroom. Students' work will be saved in progress for thirty days from the time that they first open the form. 

Teachers do not need to take any action to enable the new save-in-progress feature (officially called Autosave) of Google Forms. It will be on by default starting today for some Google Workspace domains and will be on by default for all Google Workspace domains by September 15th. Teachers can disable autosave by opening the settings menu in Google Forms then choosing "presentation" followed by "restrictions."   

Autosave in Google Forms is available now in some Google Workspace domains and will be available in all Google Workspace domains by September 15th. 

Applications for Education
Saving Google Forms responses in progress has been a feature that teachers have requested for as long as I can remember (and I've been teaching with Google Forms longer than most middle school students have been alive). Students will no longer have to start over if they get disconnected from the Internet or the bell rings to end class before they've finished answering all of the questions on a Google Form.

Here's a tutorial on how to use the save in progress feature.



There are some situations in which you may not want students to be able to come back to a Google Form to finish it after they've started. For example, a student intentionally taking a long time to answer quiz questions so that he/she can return to it later after looking up answers. In that case you can disable the autosave option on that particular form.

Google Forms Tutorials



Friday, December 10, 2021

How to Embed Google Sheets Into Websites

Earlier this week a loyal reader named Judith sent me a question about embedding Google Sheets into websites. I was happy to answer her question and made this short video to explain how to include a Google Sheet in Google Sites and in Blogger

In the video I include instructions for resizing the spreadsheet when you embed it into blog posts and websites. This is important because if you use the default embed code provided by Google Sheets, the sheet will appear very small and nearly unusable when embedded into a blog post or web page. The change to the code is to simply add width and height dimensions to the end of the code provided by Google Sheets. Watch this video to see how to embed Google Sheets into a website and adjust the size of the display of the sheet. 



Applications for Education
Embedding a Google Sheet into a website can be a good way to share collected and organized data from surveys conducted via Google Forms.

Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Google's Favorite Chrome Extensions of the Year

On The Keyword Google has announced their favorite Chrome extensions of the year. I have no idea what the criteria was to be included in the list. That said, I took a look at the list and noticed that some of Google's favorite Chrome extensions are also some of my favorite Chrome extensions. Those favorites are Mote, Loom, Kami, Wordtune, and Nimbus Screenshot. 

What these extensions do.

Wordtune
Wordtune is a Chrome extension that provides suggestions on ways to rewrite sentences in your Google Documents, in your email (Gmail and Outlook), and in some social media accounts. Once you have Wordtune installed in Chrome you can simply highlight any sentence that you have written and click the Wordtune extension to have a list of alternate wordings suggested to you. The suggested alternatives appear as a list directly below your original sentence. You can replace your original sentence with a suggested alternative by simply clicking on the suggestion that you like. Here's a demo of Wordtune.




Nimbus Screenshot
Nimbus Screenshot is a free Chrome extension that I've been using and recommending for the last half-decade. It offers tools for creating screencast videos and annotated screen capture images. Nimbus Screenshot includes a feature called Select & Scroll that proved to be very handy to me last week. Select & Scroll lets you capture not only what is currently visible on your screen but also what's visible when you scroll downward.

I use Nimbus Screenshot in Chrome, but it is also available for Firefox, and Edge. A desktop version is also available. In the following video I demonstrate how to use Nimbus Screenshot to create annotated screen capture images.



Kami
Kami is a service that enables users to annotate and comment on PDFs. You can do this directly on the Kami website or in Google Drive with Kami's Chrome extension. Kami also works with Word and Pages files.

Here's a couple of videos about how Kami works.




Loom
Loom is a Chrome extension that I find handy for quickly recording screencast videos right from my inbox. With Loom installed I can simply click the Loom icon in Gmail and start recording a video to include as part of my response to an email. I've also used Loom to create whiteboard-style videos. Both of those things are demonstrated in the videos that are embedded below (email readers, you'll have to click through to see the videos).

How to record a video in Gmail with Loom.



How to make whiteboard videos with Loom and Jamboard.



Mote
Mote is a Chrome extension that lets you add voice recordings to Google Forms, Gmail, Google Classroom, Google Slides, and Google Documents. You can also use it to record a voice note and share it via QR code.

In this video I demonstrate how to install Mote and how to activate it in your Google account. 

How to record audio in Google Docs.



How to record audio in Google Classroom.



How to use Mote in Google Forms



Watch this short video about using Mote in Gmail to learn how to record and send a voice note. The video also shows how recipients can play your voice notes even if they don't have Mote installed in their web browsers.

Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Add Voice Recordings to Google Forms Questions, Answer Choices, and Feedback

Mote is a Chrome extension that became popular this year because it made it easy for teachers and students to add voice recordings to Google Slides, Google Classroom, and Google Forms. The latest update to Mote, released today, lets you add voice recordings not only to the questions in your Google Forms but also to the answer choices and feedback section in Google Forms. 

The previous version of Mote let you add voice recordings into the question line. The updated version lets you also add voice recordings into the answer choices (for multiple choice questions) and into the feedback section of the answer key that you create for quizzes in Google Forms. All of those things are demonstrated in this short video


Applications for Education
Adding voice recordings to Google Forms has a lot of potential classroom uses. Just having the option to listen to the question and answer choices improves the accessibility of your forms. You could also use the voice recording option to have students listen to question prompts in one language then identify the answer in another language. For example, you could record a prompt in Spanish then ask students to identify what you said by choosing an answer written or recorded in English. 

Saturday, December 4, 2021

Two Options for Automatically Removing Choices from Google Forms

Earlier this week a reader of my newsletter sent me a question looking for a way to limit the number of times that an answer choice could be used on a Google Form. My first suggestion was to try the Google Forms add-on called Choice Eliminator 2

Choice Eliminator 2 is a Google Forms add-on that I've used for years to limit the number of times that an answer choice can be used on a Google Form. When the limit is reached, the answer choice stops appearing on the form. For example, if I create a multiple choice question like "what's your first choice of winter carnival activity?" and then give four answer choices, I can then use Choice Eliminator 2 to only allow answer choice "A" to be chosen three times before it disappears from the form. In fact, that's exactly what I demonstrate in the second half of this video

Choice Removal is another Google Forms add-on that will remove answer choices from a Google Form as they get used up. The difference between Choice Removal and Choice Eliminator 2 is that Choice Removal doesn't allow you to specify how many times an answer choice can be used. Instead, Choice Removal simply removes an answer choice as soon as it has been used one time. 

In this video I demonstrate how both Choice Eliminator 2 and Choice Removal work. 

Monday, November 22, 2021

How to Create Re-usable Daily Check-in Forms

Last week a reader emailed me with a question about creating a form that could be used many times over for things like daily check-in or exit ticket questions. He wanted to be able to have all responses in one place where responses could easily be sorted according to date or name. My suggestion was to create a Google Form and then sort the responses in a connected Google Sheet. 

In this short video I demonstrate the two ways that I would create a Google Form for daily check-ins and then view and sort responses in Google Sheets. 



To learn more about sorting information in Google Sheets, watch this short video.



Applications for Education
As I mentioned in the video above, repeatedly using a Google Form to collect information about how your students feel about each day's lessons could be a good way to identify patterns or trends. For example, if every Wednesday my students respond with "I don't get it," I'll want to examine what's happening on Wednesdays that's impacting my students' comprehension of the day's lessons. Perhaps every Wednesday my lesson is right before lunch whereas on other days it's right after lunch (a true quirk of my schedule last year).

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Certify'em - Send Personalized Certificates via Google Forms

Certify'em is a Google Forms add-on that I've been using for the last few years whenever I need to distribute personalized certificates. Certify'em will automatically send certificates to students when they get a minimum score on a quiz conducted with Google Forms. You set the minimum passing score that triggers the delivery of the certificate. If students achieve that score or more, a personalized certificate is sent to them via email or Google Drive. 

Certify'em has always provided some certificate templates and the option to utilize your own certificate template. Recently, Certify'em added some new certificate template options. The new options include updated designs and an easier way to utilize your own certificate templates. 

Previously, if you wanted to use your own template design in Certify'em you had to create it in Google Slides before importing it into Certify'em. Now Certify'em lets you simply click "Create My Own" from the certificate template menu to jump right into designing your own custom certificate template. 



Applications for Education
Besides using Certify'em to give students certificates for doing well on a quiz or test, I use Certify'em to send certificates to people who have completed one of my professional development courses. I've also seen Certify'em used to send certificates to students who have successfully completed lab safety and protocols assessments. 

Monday, November 1, 2021

Embed Google Forms & Microsoft Forms into Canva Designs

It seem like every week I find something new and interesting that can be done with Canva. Last Friday I discovered that you can embed working Google Forms and Microsoft Forms into your Canva designs. This works with Canva's website templates as well as presentation and infographic templates. 

In this short video I demonstrate how you can create a simple website with Canva and include a Google Form or Microsoft Form in that website. 


Applications for Education
Canva's website templates are great for making simple websites that accomplish a singular goal like attracting interest in an upcoming school event. By putting a Google Form or Microsoft Form into website you can collect RSVPs to your upcoming event. You could also include a form so that people can contact you with questions through the website. 

By the way, this video was also featured in my Practical Ed Tech Newsletter on Sunday evening. If you're not subscribed to that weekly newsletter, you can subscribe right here

Monday, October 18, 2021

An Overview of Google Forms Quiz Settings

Back in July I published a series of videos and blog posts detailing what you need to know to get started using Google Classroom, Drive, Docs, Slides, and Forms in your classroom (those are linked below). Of course, Google had to make some updates to Google Forms right at the start of the new school year and in doing so added some more functionality to Google Forms while also moving the location of some settings menus. That's why I recorded a new overview of Google Forms quiz settings. 

In my new video, An Overview of Google Forms Quiz Settings, you'll learn:

  • How to access the settings. 
  • What each setting does. 
  • Why you may or may not want to use some settings. 



More Helpful Google Forms Tutorials:

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

How to Combine Multiple Google Forms Questions in One New Form

One of my top time-savers when creating a new Google Form is to import questions from other forms that I've previously created. For example, if I'm making a quiz for my current students I will import questions from quizzes that I made the year before. I don't re-use the entire quiz from the previous. I just use some of the questions. Another example is found when I am creating a longer form like an end-of-semester review activity. When I'm doing that I'll import questions from multiple quizzes given earlier the semester into one new form. 

In this video I demonstrate how to import questions from multiple Google Forms into one new form. 



Take a look at my YouTube channel for many more Google Forms tutorials covering everything from the basics through advanced uses like adding voice notes to Google Forms.

How to Schedule Re-use of Google Forms

Earlier this week a reader sent me a question about re-using the same Google Form multiple times per week or month. The idea being that students would answer the same questions multiple times throughout the week or month and the teacher would be able to see all of the responses in the same Google Sheet. 

There are a couple of ways to schedule the re-use of the same Google Form for student responses. The first is to manually create and schedule assignments in Google Classroom. Each assignment would include the same Google Form. While that works, it could get tedious to manually schedule the assignments over and over again. Another solution is to create a recurring event in Google Calendar and attach the Form to the event. That allows you to schedule it once and have it repeat as many times as you like on your schedule. The downside to that method is that students have to go to the Google Classroom Calendar to see the event and the attached Form. 

In this short video I demonstrate both methods of scheduling a Google Form for re-use on your schedule. 



If you have a question for me, feel free to email me. Some questions will even be included in the next episode of Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions.

Monday, October 4, 2021

A Solution When Google Forms or Microsoft Forms Won't Do What You Need

Google Forms and Microsoft Forms can be used to accomplish a lot of common school tasks like creating self-grading quizzes, managing sign-out/sign-in sheets, and collecting survey data. But there are some tasks that Google Forms and Microsoft Forms can't do or can only do in a rather convoluted way. I was reminded of this when a reader sent me an email looking for help creating an online form that parents could complete to book a parent-teaching conference while simultaneously submitting information about the concerns they want to discuss during the meeting. My first suggestion was to try Google Calendar appointment slots, but that didn't offer enough structure for responses. My second suggestion was to take a look at JotForm. 

JotForm is an excellent alternative to Google Forms and Microsoft Forms because it offers capabilities that Google Forms and Microsoft Forms don't offer. For example, without the need for a third-party addon you can set limits on the number of times a response choice can be chosen. Another great feature is the ability to turn form responses into a fillable PDF. For those who manage after-school clubs or other groups that need to collect payments, JotForm offers that option. But the best aspect of JotForm is the gallery of more than 10,000 premade form templates that you can use. 

Within JotForm's gallery of templates there is a collection of more than 200 appointment form templates. You can customize the templates to fit your needs as well as integrate them with Google Calendar, Excel, Zoom, and a bunch of other helpful services. So if you're looking for an alternative to using Google Forms or Microsoft Forms to manage meeting scheduling, take a look at JotForm. I've included a couple of tutorials below to help you get started. 

How to Create an Online Form and Fillable PDF With JotForm

How to Create an Appointment Scheduler With JotForm

Friday, September 10, 2021

Save Google Forms Responses in Progress

About a month ago Google announced that they were finally adding an autosave option to Google Forms. This new features lets students leave a Google Form and then come back to it later to finish answering the questions on it. The option to save work in progress in Google Forms is rolling out to all users over the next few weeks. If you haven't seen it or tried it, take a look at my short video to see how it works. 



Applications for Education
Saving Google Forms responses in progress has been a feature that teachers have requested for as long as I can remember (and I've been teaching with Google Forms longer than most middle school students have been alive). Students will no longer have to start over if they get disconnected from the Internet or the bell rings to end class before they've finished answering all of the questions on a Google Form.

There are some situations in which you may not want students to be able to come back to a Google Form to finish it after they've started. For example, a student intentionally taking a long time to answer quiz questions so that he/she can return to it later after looking up answers. In that case you can disable the autosave option on that particular form.

More Google Forms Tutorials



Saturday, September 4, 2021

Fish, Moose, Jam, and Drawings - The Week in Review

Good morning from Maine where we're getting ready for a day of outdoor fun. My youngest daughter wants to go catch a fish and my oldest daughter wants to see a moose. Fortunately, a little time in the boat on Mooselookmeguntic Lake provides a great opportunity to make both of my daughters happy. I hope that you have a happy weekend as well.

As I do early every Saturday morning, I've compiled a list of the most popular posts of the week. Take a look and see if there's something new or interesting that you can apply to your classroom.

These were the most popular posts of the week:
1. Five Ideas for Using Google Jamboard This Fall
2. Five Google Forms Refreshers for the New School Year
3. Five Benefits of Conducting Mind Mapping Activities
4. 11 Search Tips and Tools for Teachers and Students
5. Add Your Voice to Google Forms
6. Five Ideas for Using Google Earth & Maps for More Than Social Studies Lessons
7. Five Ideas for Using Google Drawings This Fall

On-demand Professional Development
Other Places to Follow Me:
  • The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter comes out every Sunday evening/ Monday morning. It features my favorite tip of the week and the week's most popular posts from Free Technology for Teachers.
  • My YouTube channel has more than 37,000 subscribers watching my short tutorial videos on a wide array of educational technology tools. 
  • I've been Tweeting as @rmbyrne for fourteen years. 
  • The Free Technology for Teachers Facebook page features new and old posts from this blog throughout the week. 
  • If you're curious about my life outside of education, you can follow me on Instagram or Strava.
This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and WayBetterSite. Featured image captured by Richard Byrne.

Thursday, September 2, 2021

Add Your Voice to Google Forms

Yesterday I shared five Google Forms refreshers for the new school year. That post focused on settings that are built into Google Forms. You can do even more with Google Forms when you install Google Forms add-ons and or Chrome extensions. For example, you can add voice recordings to your Google Forms through the use of a Chrome extension called Mote

Mote is my favorite new Chrome extension in 2021. It can be used to add audio to Google Forms as well as audio to comments in Google Docs, Slides, and Classroom. In this short video I demonstrate how to use Mote to add audio to Google Forms.  

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Five Google Forms Refreshers for the New School Year

Answering a reader's question about Google Jamboard ideas that she should pass along to her colleagues prompted me to think about some "need to know" features of other Google Workspace tools for teachers. My mind turned to Google Forms as it is a tool that when used correctly can help be a huge time-saver for teachers. There are also features of Google Forms that can be beneficial to students. To that end, here are five Google Forms features that can help you and your students in the new school year. 

Set Default Point Values
If you've ever created a quiz in Google Forms only to discover that you forgot to assign point values, one small change to your preferences can make that a thing of the past. In your Google Forms preferences you can set a default point value for all questions that you add to your quiz. Here's a video demo of how to do that.



Create QR Codes for Google Forms
I uses a Google Form as a sign-in/sign-out sheet for my classroom. Rather than making students type a link or find a link within Google Classroom, I simply printed a QR code for the Google Form and then taped it to the wall. Then students can simply use their phones to scan the code and access the Google Form to sign-out or sign-in. Making a QR code for a Google Form is easy thanks to a feature built into Google Chrome, here's a video of how it works.


Provide Instant Feedback to Responses
I've long been a proponent of giving students practice quizzes and self-guided review activities via Google Forms. That's because I can provide students with instant feedback on their responses. Not only can I tell them if their answers were correct or not, I can also provide them with additional information about why their answers were correct or not. I'll often include links to additional information within my automated written feedback. Watch this video to see how to add answer feedback to Google Forms and see how students view that feedback.



Require Complete Sentence Responses
Google Forms has a setting called "response validation." With that setting enabled you can require that students write a minimum number of letters or words in order to submit responses to your Google Form. This video shows you how to use the response validation settings to encourage students to write complete sentences.


Combine Multiple Forms Into One
Over the course of the school year I'll make lots of Google Forms. Combining questions from those forms is an easy way to create a review activity for my students. Google Forms makes it easy to import questions from other forms into a new one. Here's a demo of how to do that.

Friday, August 6, 2021

How to Find the New Autosave Feature in Google Forms

Earlier this week Google announced the launch of a new autosave feature in Google Forms. As I wrote on Tuesday, teachers and students have been asking for this feature for years. That's why I haven't been surprised by the number of emails that I've gotten this week from teachers asking if they need to do anything to enable autosave and or when the autosave feature will be available. 

The new Google Forms autosave feature is available now in some Google accounts. One of my four accounts has the feature right now. I keep checking my other three accounts in the hopes that they'll soon have autosave as well. The way that I'm checking is by simply creating a new Google Form quiz then looking at the presentation settings for that quiz. If the account has the new autosave feature, there will be a "restrictions" menu that appears in the presentation settings for the quiz. See my screenshot and my video below for more details. 

Wednesday, August 4, 2021

A New Google Forms Feature Teachers Have Requested for Years!

This week Google finally added a feature to Google Forms that teachers and students have requested for years. You can now save your work in progress when answering questions in Google Forms!

Google Forms will now save students' work in progress when they are completing a quiz or any other Google Form that you give to them through Google Classroom. The only thing that students have to do to have their work saved in progress is make sure that they are signed into their Google accounts. That shouldn't be too hard to remember if the students have accessed the form through Google Classroom. Students' work will be saved in progress for thirty days from the time that they first open the form. 

Teachers do not need to take any action to enable the new save-in-progress feature (officially called Autosave) of Google Forms. It will be on by default starting today for some Google Workspace domains and will be on by default for all Google Workspace domains by September 15th. Teachers can disable autosave by opening the settings menu in Google Forms then choosing "presentation" followed by "restrictions."   

Autosave in Google Forms is available now in some Google Workspace domains and will be available in all Google Workspace domains by September 15th. 

Applications for Education
Saving Google Forms responses in progress has been a feature that teachers have requested for as long as I can remember (and I've been teaching with Google Forms longer than most middle school students have been alive). Students will no longer have to start over if they get disconnected from the Internet or the bell rings to end class before they've finished answering all of the questions on a Google Form.

There are some situations in which you may not want students to be able to come back to a Google Form to finish it after they've started. For example, a student intentionally taking a long time to answer quiz questions so that he/she can return to it later after looking up answers. In that case you can disable the autosave option on that particular form.

Google Forms Tutorials



Friday, July 30, 2021

My Most Popular Tutorials in July

In July my YouTube my YouTube channel passed the 37,000 subscriber mark. In July I published twenty-three new tutorials including some in-depth guides to getting started with Google Workspace for Education. On my YouTube you'll also find tutorials on a wide variety of topics including making your own Android apps, video creation tips, Microsoft Forms tutorials, podcasting tips, and many other topics suggested by readers and viewers like you. Below are the ten videos on my YouTube channel that were watched the most in July. 

How to Create a Video With Canva


The Basics of Creating a Quiz in Google Forms


How to Add a Timer to Your PowerPoint Slides


Wheel of Names - A Random Name Picker and More


How to Draw on Your Screen in Google Meet


How to Create Your Own Online Board Game


How to print a Google Form or save it as PDF


How to Find and Use the Embed Code for YouTube Videos



How to Import and Copy Questions One Google Form to Another



How to Annotate PDFs in OneNote