Showing posts with label group blogging. Show all posts
Showing posts with label group blogging. Show all posts

Saturday, February 7, 2015

Weekend Fun Thread - Share Your "Welcome to Teaching Moment"

Over the years I've written about and spoken about using Padlet as a collaborative blogging tool. To demonstrate how this could work, I've created a Padlet wall to share "welcome to teaching moments." I'm thinking about the fun, cute, or "whoa" moments that most of us had early in our careers that let us know that now were really teachers with our own classrooms. I've started the thread with my story. The wall is open now and I'll keep it open for the weekend. To post your story just double-click on the wall and start writing.




If you haven't used Padlet before, I have a video here that demonstrates how to get started with it. And for experienced Padlet users I have a video here about creating custom columns on Padlet.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Padlet Streams - A Simple Way to Create a Group Blog

Padlet (formerly known as Wallwisher) is one of my favorite tools to use to have students quickly share ideas, questions, and multimedia notes on one page. Until today all of the notes that were added to a Padlet page appeared wherever a visitor double clicked. You can still use that free form format, but now you can also use a chronological format that Padlet is calling "streams."  Streams places all notes into a chronological order based on the timestamp of when each note is written.

Applications for Education
Creating a Padlet page in the stream format could be a good way to create a simple, collaborative blog for students. You could create the page, select "stream" format, and make the page accessible for students to write short posts on. Their posts could include images and videos. If you want to, you can password protect your Padlet pages and moderate messages before they appear on your Padlet page. Please see A Teacher's Guide to Backchannels and Informal Assessment Tools to learn more about using Padlet. 

Saturday, February 16, 2013

It's Official, Posterous Is Shutting Down - Get Your Data Now

A few weeks ago when it seemed inevitable that Posterous Spaces would be shutting I wrote directions on how to deal with it. Yesterday, Posterous made its official announcement that it will be shutting down on April 30. The announcement includes some directions on how to export your data. You can also follow my annotated screenshots of the process. (click the images to view them in full size)


Step 1: Sign into your Posterous Spaces account and select "backup."

Step 2: Select the blog(s) that you want to backup.

Step 3: Enter captcha code and your email address to be notified when your backup is ready.

Step 4: Download zip file containing the contents of your blog.


One of the great things about Posterous was that students could post to a group blog via email. That option is also available in Blogger. You can learn how to set that up in Blogger in my post here.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Easy Group Blogging With Posterous Spaces

Posterous Spaces was bought by Twitter earlier this year, but it appears to still be going strong and hasn't changed at all since it was acquired by Twitter. One of the things about Posterous that I have always liked is the ease with which you can create a group blog.

In Posterous Spaces you can allow people to make contributions to your blog by simply sending an email to "yourblog'sname" @ posterous.com. For example, if I created the blog "awesomeblog.posterous.com" I could allow others to contribute to the blog by simply sending an email to "awesomeblog@posterous.com." You can choose to moderate or not moderate those contributions. From an administrative standpoint, using the email method of contributing to a group blog is much easier than having to enter permissions for each person you want contributing to your group blog.


Applications for Education
Accepting email contributions to your Posterous Spaces blog means that don't have to spend time walking students through creating log-in credentials for another service. Simply have students send an email to "yourblog'sname" @posterous.com and their posts can appear on the blog. It's the quickest way that I have found to get a classroom full of students contributing to one blog.

Sunday, October 9, 2011

How to Get Started Using Posterous Spaces

Yesterday, in preparation for a workshop I'm running this week I created a new set of slides demonstrating the basics of creating a blog on Posterous. As I mentioned last month, this semester I am using Posterous to have my students contribute to a group blog in which they summarize what they learned each week.



If you're introducing other educators to Posterous, please feel free to use these slides. All I ask for is attribution. These slides have been added to my page about creating blogs and websites.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Try Posterous Spaces for Private Classroom Blogging

Posterous, a blog service that I've written about in the past, recently made some changes to their service that educators should be aware of. First, the name of the service is now Posterous Spaces to reflect the fact that the service is designed for groups to share content with each other publicly or privately. Second, now when you create a blog or "space" with Posterous you can make that space public or private. A private space can only be viewed by those people you specify in your administration panel. Likewise, you can control who can and cannot comment on your blog's posts. You can maintain a mixture of private and public spaces within one Posterous Spaces account.

One thing that hasn't changed about Posterous is that you can still allow people to make contributions to your blog by simply sending an email to "yourblog'sname" @ posterous.com. You can choose to moderate or not moderate those contributions. From an administrative standpoint, using the email method of contributing to a group blog is much easier than having to enter permissions for each person you want contributing to your group blog.

Here are two videos explaining the new Posterous Spaces features.


Introducing Posterous Spaces from Posterous on Vimeo.


What's new and what's different about Posterous Spaces from Posterous on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
As I mentioned above, you can have people contributing to a group blog using Posterous Spaces without having to create usernames and passwords for them. Simply have them send an email to "yourblog'sname" @posterous.com and their posts can appear on the blog. It's the quickest way that I have found to get a classroom full of students contributing to one blog. In fact, this is the method that I am using in my Global Studies course this fall.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Minigroup - Create Private Groups for Blogging and Sharing Files

Minigroup is a free service for creating private groups in which you can share files, calendars, and announcements. Within your Minigroup account you can create multiple private groups so that you can have a group for sharing with friends, a group for sharing with colleagues, and a group for sharing with students. In each of your Minigroup groups you can post and invite people to events, post reminders, and share files. Minigroup postings are hid from search engines and anyone who is not invited into your group.

Watch a video overview of Minigroup below.



Applications for Education
Minigroup could be used as a private group blog for your classes. You could have students contribute to the group blog. Minigroup allows you to create multiple groups within your account so if you teach multiple sections of the same course you could oversee multiple groups with one log-in.

Saturday, September 4, 2010

How to Set Up a Group Blog in Posterous

Earlier this week I received an email from an employee of Posterous telling me that a couple of my blog posts had led to them receiving a wave of emails from teachers looking for more information about group blogging. In response to taht wave, Posterous created a how-to video that demonstrates the steps necessary to create your own group blog using Posterous. The video includes how to make your Posterous group site private.

Watch the video below.


You'll notice the video includes registering a custom domain for a fee. You can do that if you want, but it's not necessary for using Posterous.

Applications for Education
As the video above demonstrates, Posterous could be a good option for creating a private group blog. If you're looking for your students to each create their own blogs, Posterous makes it easy for them to do that too.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
How Students Can Blog Without an Email Address
Posterous - A Simple Way for Students to Blog
Free 33 Page Guide - Google for Teachers

Monday, April 12, 2010

Posterous Adds More Editing Options

Last week microblog service Posterous announced that they are not a microblog service. Posterous made that announcement as they unveiled three new blog post creation options designed to help it compete with full-fledged blogging services like Tumblr, Blogger, and WordPress. The most significant of the new features is a new option to construct blog posts containing multiple media formats. Posterous users can now arrange media elements however they wish within blog posts. Posterous also introduced the option for creating media galleries through a simple drag and drop interface.

Applications for Education
I've previously written about Posterous being a good option for quickly creating group blogs for students. In the past students could contribute their own posts to a Posterous blog, but now they can help each other edit and enhance blog posts. Using the new blog post editing options one student could contribute an image to a post and another could contribute video to that same post.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
TypePad Micro Offers an Easy Way to Start Blogging
Gaga Post - Group Blogging
Soup.io A Simple Yet Feature-Packed Blogging Platform

Monday, December 14, 2009

Simple Group Blogging Made Possible by Posterous

I don't know how I've missed this in my previous mentions of Posterous (here and here), but I just realized that Posterous offers a really simple group blogging system. Posterous is known for its dead simple posting system. To post to your Posterous blog you simply send an email to Posterous. To create a group blog simply sign into your Posterous blog and add the email addresses of those people who you would like to have contribute to your blog. See the screen capture below for more information.













Applications for Education
Posterous could be a great option for creating a classroom blog to which all of your students can contribute. In order to post to your classroom blog created with Posterous all your students need to do is send an email. They don't have to remember any usernames or passwords other than their email. Posting through email also ensures that you won't have any students accidentally deleting another student's contribution.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
TypePad Micro Offers an Easy Way to Start Blogging
Gaga Post - Group Blogging
Soup.io A Simple Yet Feature-Packed Blogging Platform