Showing posts with label hurricanes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hurricanes. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Hurricane Webinar 2018!

Thanks to a teacher at Sigsbee Charter School in Key West I learned about a free webinar for fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students. The webinar is the 2018 Hurricane Webinar hosted by Hurricanes: Science and Society team in partnership with the NOAA National Hurricane Center and the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center.

The goal of the 2018 Hurricane Webinar is to teach students about hurricane hazards, hurricane forecasting, observing hurricanes with airplanes, and hurricane preparedness.

This free webinar is scheduled for May 9, 2018 at 10:00 Central Time. Click here to learn more about the webinar and click here to register.

On a related note, Hurricanes: Engines of Destruction is a good video that explains how the Coriolis Effect influences the direction in which hurricanes rotate, the role of heat in hurricane formation, and the origin of the word hurricane. The video is embedded below, but you should also take a look at the video on YouTube to access the reference materials used in the creation of the video.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

A Good Lesson on Hurricanes

The Atlantic hurricane season season is here and It's Okay To Be Smart (produced by PBS) has a new video lesson about hurricanes. By watching Hurricanes: Engines of Destruction you can learn how the Coriolis effect influences the direction in which hurricanes rotate, the role of heat in hurricane formation, and the origin of the word hurricane. The video is embedded below, but you should also take a look at the video on YouTube to access the reference materials used in the creation of the video.


Try one of the following tools to build a flipped lesson around this video.

Vizia is a free tool for creating video-based quizzes. On Vizia you an import a video from YouTube or from Wistia and then add questions along the timeline of the video. You can ask multiple choice questions as well as short answer/ open-response questions. Adding a poll question into the video is also a possibility in Vizia. All of the responses to your questions are collected in a spreadsheet that you can download and or open in Google Sheets. When you create a Vizia video quiz you have the option to require that viewers enter their names and email addresses before they begin. Alternatively, you could make the first question in the video a prompt to enter a name.

VideoNotes is a neat tool for taking notes while watching videos. VideoNotes allows you to load any YouTube video on the left side of your screen and on the right side of the screen VideoNotes gives you a notepad to type on. VideoNotes integrates with your Google Drive account. By integrating with Google Drive VideoNotes allows you to share your notes and collaborate on your notes just as you can do with a Google Document. You can use VideoNotes to have students submit questions to you and each other while watching videos. Of course, you can insert questions into the conversation for your students to answer too.

EDPuzzle is a neat tool that allows you to add your voice and text questions to educational videos. On EDpuzzle you can search for educational videos and or upload your own videos to use as the basis of your lesson. EDpuzzle has an online classroom component that you can use to assign videos to students and track their progress through your video lessons. Within EDPuzzle's editor you can select portions of videos for students to watch. EDPuzzle offers the option to share your videos to Google Classroom.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Two Flipped Lessons on Aspects of Meteorology

This afternoon I found myself in one of those YouTube vortexes in which I couldn't stop jumping from video to video. I started out looking for a video about hurricanes (I never did find it) and ended up finding two other meteorology lessons that I thought were worth sharing.

First, NOVA offers a good video about The Coriolis Effect. The three minute animated video explains why storms spin in different directions depending on their location. The video is clear and concise which makes it ideal for a flipped classroom lesson. Click here for information about Blubbr, TeachEm, and VideoNotes which are good tools for building flipped lessons.


The second video I stumbled upon this afternoon was The History of the Barometer. This TED-Ed lesson covers the history, development, and use of barometers in forecasting the weather.



Image credit: "1890s Barometer" by André Lage Freitas - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1890s_Barometer.JPG#mediaviewer/File:1890s_Barometer.JPG

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Video - Hurricane Hunters in Action

It's hurricane season and your students can track hurricanes in Google Earth. But they might wonder, like I once did, how meteorologists get hurricane data. One of the ways they get the data is from planes flown into hurricanes. NOAA's Hurricane Hunters is a short video about the pilots, the scientists, and the planes that fly into hurricanes to gather storm data. You can watch the video online or download it here.  


Monday, June 25, 2012

Track 2012 Hurricanes in Google Earth

The Atlantic hurricane season started this month. In past years Google added a hurricane tracking layer to Google Earth. That doesn't seem to be the case this year. Fortunately, you can still track hurricanes in Google Earth if you follow the directions shared by Seattle meteorologist Morgan Palmer. The directions are straight-forward, but you will need to be able to download files to your computer  and have the latest version of Google Earth installed in order to track hurricanes in Google Earth.

Applications for Education
Using Google Earth to look at the path of hurricanes and other storms is one way to bring current news into the science classroom. Tracking hurricanes in Google Earth is a good way to teach students how to use Google Earth while teaching lessons about hurricanes and tropical storms. 


H/T to the Google Earth Blog. 

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

11 Resources for Teaching and Learning About the Forces of Nature

After last weekend's visit from Hurricane Irene I have forces of nature on my brain. I guess there is something about seeing a giant tree across your neighbor's yard will do that to you. Therefore, today I assembled a list of some of my favorite resources for teaching and learning about forces of nature.

This one is a couple of years old but it is still good. USA Today has a slide presentation explaining how tornadoes are formed and what to do if you find yourself in the path of a tornado. The slide show is controlled by the viewer who moves a slider at the bottom of the screen to explore the formation of a tornado.


Forces of Nature is a film produced by National Geographic designed to educate students about volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornadoes. The Forces of Nature website provides a nice list of complete lesson plans for teachers of students in grades K through 12. Even if you can't get a copy of the movie, most of the lesson plans and activities are still very usable. Teachers of grades K through 6 may also want to check out the National Geographic Kids page titled Ten Freaky Forces of Nature.

If you can't acquire the Forces of Nature film (available on Amazon $17.99), you may want to consider a similar film from National Geographic titled Violent Earth. Violent Earth can be viewed for free on Snag Films. Using Snag Films you can also embed the Violent Earth video into your blog, wiki, or website.

The USGS in partnership with the University of Utah produces the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory records and publishes data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. Much of the material on the site is very scientific in nature, but the Observatory website does offer some educational materials accessible to the non-scientist. The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory offers three videos about the volcanoes of Yellowstone. The Observatory also offers photographic tours of Yellowstone.


Shape It Up is one of many good educational games and activities on Kinetic City. Shape It Up is an activity that would be good for use in an elementary school Earth Science lesson. The activity presents students with "before" and "after" images of a piece of Earth. Students then have to select the force nature and the span of time it took to create the "after" picture. If students choose incorrectly, Shape It Up will tell the student and they can choose again.

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean.

The USGS produces a good assortment of resources for teaching and learning about earthquakes. The USGS has resources for teachers and for students on every grade level from elementary school through college. Not included in the teachers resource section, but including in the general education page, are these flash animations of earthquakes and seismic activities. For Google Earth users the USGS produces Google Earth files for viewing earthquakes. One set of Google Earth files that the USGS produces allows you to view seismic activity in near-real time (the file refreshes every five minutes).

Violent Earth, produced by National Geographic, is a film about the causes of earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes. It's an excellent documentary if you have the time to watch it. But if you're searching for a shorter video explanation of the causes of tsunamis, National Geographic has something to fit that bill too. Tsunamis 101 is a three and one-half minute video about how a tsunami is caused and why they can be so deadly. The video is embedded below.



Volcano Above the Clouds is a NOVA program that chronicles an ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro by a group of climbers and scientists. In addition to the video, Volcano Above the Clouds offers a large collection of materials and teaching guides for learning about volcanoes, glaciers, and climate change with Mount Kilimanjaro at the center of each lesson. As Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the Seven Summits of the world, NOVA provides a slideshow of the Seven Summits which puts Kilimanjaro into perspective relative to those other summits.

The BBC has a series of interactive guides that explain how natural disasters are caused. Included in this series is a twelve part animated explanation of volcanic eruptions. The series also includes explanations of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis.

















For learning about earthquakes, the BBC has an animated guide to earthquakes. National Geographic offers an in-depth lesson plan for teaching elementary school students about earthquakes and volcanoes. National Geographic also has some excellent educational films about earthquakes, but if you do not have the budget to purchase them you may want to try Snag Films where you can watch full length documentaries like Violent Earth for free.

Hurricane Irene Before and After in Google Earth

Although not as strong as predicted, Hurricane Irene came and went leaving a path of destruction in its wake (some of my colleagues are still without power as I write this on Wednesday morning). To show the effects of Hurricane Irene on the topography of the east coast of the U.S. a reader of the Google Earth Blog developed a KMZ file with image overlays to show the before and after of Hurricane Irene. The KMZ file was developed using imagery from NOAA's Hurricane Irene Image Index.

Applications for Education
The imagery in this before and after KMZ file could be good for showing students how wind and rain shape coastlines. If you live in one of the areas that felt the effects of Hurricane Irene this KMZ file might start a discussion about any changes your students observed after the storm.

H/T to the Google Earth Blog, of course.

Monday, August 29, 2011

Katrina's Children - The Hurricane Through Children's Eyes

This week's Snag Learning Film of the Week is Katrina's Children. Six years ago Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans and the Gulf Coast region. Katrina's Children is an eighty minute documentary of the experience through children's stories. A preview of the film is embedded below. You can watch the whole documentary and find corresponding discussion questions here.

Watch more free documentaries

You can find four other documentaries about Hurricane Katrina in this list on Snag Learning.

Friday, August 26, 2011

Hurricane Irene and Hurricanes Past

Hurricane Irene is heading up the east coast of the US with more force than we've seen in quite a while. Today's episode of CNN Student News covers the track of Irene. The segment also compares Irene to past hurricanes that have hit the coast of the US. The episode is embedded below.

For more resources about Hurricane Irene I recommend checking out the list of mapping resources that Google Maps Mania and the Google Earth Blog have assembled.

And of course, I wish safety and good thoughts to all of my friends and readers in the areas affected by Hurricane Irene.

Monday, August 30, 2010

Katrina - Then and Now

Today's episode of CNN Student News begins with segment about the effects of Hurricane Katrina still felt in New Orleans. The segment includes images taken in the days right after Hurricane Katrina hit compared with images of those same places today. The video is embedded below.

Visit Larry Ferlazzo's list for more resources for teaching about the five year anniversary of Hurrican Katrina.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:

Monday, August 23, 2010

Five Resources for Lessons About Hurricanes

Hurricane season officially started back in June, but those of us in New England tend to associate late summer and early fall with hurricanes. Or maybe it's just me that makes that association because I was in the first grade when I first learned first-hand about hurricanes through Hurricane Gloria. If you're planning to teach lessons about hurricanes this fall, here are some resources that could help you out.

Forces of Nature is a film produced by National Geographic designed to educate students about volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornadoes. The Forces of Nature website provides a nice list of complete lesson plans for teachers of students in grades K through 12. Even if you can't get a copy of the movie, most of the lesson plans and activities are still very usable. Teachers of grades K through 6 may also want to check out the National Geographic Kids page titled Ten Freaky Forces of Nature. If you can't acquire the Forces of Nature film (available on Amazon $17.99), you may want to consider a similar film from National Geographic titled Violent Earth. Violent Earth can be viewed for free on Snag Films.

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean. For teachers Stop Disasters provides fact sheets to distribute to students about each type of natural disaster. Stop Disasters also provides teachers with teaching guides, lesson plan ideas, and links to additional reference materials.

Google Earth is a good tool that teachers and students can use to track the movement of a hurricane. Below is a short video about using Google Earth to track storms. The video was created by Frank Taylor from the Google Earth Blog.

On a related note, the video below shows you how to put weather radar maps on your desktop using Google Earth.

NOAA has a free nineteen page booklet that explains how hurricanes are formed, the structure of hurricanes, and how hurricanes are observed. The booklet also contains information about naming hurricanes. Click here to open and download the PDF.

Snag Films, mentioned above, is currently hosting a documentary titled Katrina's Children. The documentary explores the impact of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans through the viewpoints of children from New Orleans. Watch a preview of the film below.

Watch more free documentaries

Saturday, June 27, 2009

Hurricane Season - Hurricane Tracking in GE

It's officially Hurricane Season again in the United States. Just as they did last year, Google LatLong has announced the creation of a hurricane layer for Google Earth. You can access the layer under "weather" in Google Earth. As a part of that announcement from Google was a link to NOAA's National Hurricane Center. On the National Hurricane Center website you can find information about currently developing storms as well as archived records of past storms.

Applications for Education
Using Google Earth to look at the path of hurricanes and other storms is one way to bring current news into the science classroom. The start of school coincides with hurricane season which presents teachers with a great opportunity to introduce students to the workings of Google Earth while teaching lessons about hurricanes and tropical storms.

Here are a couple of related resources that may be of interest to you:
Stop Disasters - Disaster Simulation Game
Hurricane Tracking Resources
Two Ways to Watch National Geographic Online

Sunday, April 19, 2009

Stop Disasters - Disaster Simulation Game

Stop Disasters is a game designed for students to learn about natural disasters, disaster prevention, and city design. There are five game scenarios that students can play. Students can plan to prepare for hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, and tsunamis. The scenarios are set in geographically accurate contexts of Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean.

For teachers Stop Disasters provides fact sheets to distribute to students about each type of natural disaster. Stop Disasters also provides teachers with teaching guides, lesson plan ideas, and links to additional reference materials.

Applications for Education
Stop Disasters could be a great game for geography teachers and Earth science teachers to use in their classrooms. In order to be successful in this game students have to have knowledge of geography concepts and Earth science concepts.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
My Mini City
Five Resources for Teaching About Earthquakes

Forces of Nature - Earth Science Resources
Hurricane Tracking Resources

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