Showing posts with label leadership. Show all posts
Showing posts with label leadership. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Chromebook Rollout Through Teacher Leadership

This week I am hosting some guest bloggers. This is a guest post from Todd Samuelson.

As the administrator responsible for technology in my school I had the opportunity to facilitate a Chromebook pilot project. Every grade seven student was loaned a Chromebook (CB) for the school year. The goal of the pilot was to determine the effectiveness of utilizing one-to-one devices to enhance learning in the classroom and to improve technology capacity among teachers as we move towards an eventual B.Y.O.D. school.

In early October nearly 200 Chromebooks were deployed and the journey began. Eight months later and the project can only be described as a success. One of the first steps in the process was to get CBs into the hands of teachers. We had an evening of professional development for teachers to receive support, but because CBs are so intuitive it did not take long for the majority of the teachers to become somewhat proficient. We created a google classroom that we used to communicate information, thoughts, concerns and tips. We sent a letter home to parents explaining the project and hosted an information night with presentations and an opportunity for questions.

For the students, in the beginning, a great deal of time was spent on building capacity regarding how to care for their device. Students were given formal lessons on proper care and respect for the device being loaned to them. This paid off tremendously as students took ownership for their CB and we were fortunate to have very little damage or issues related to misuse. Knowing that a goal would be to allow students to transport a device home, our teacher-librarian, Lisa, collected resources and created an extensive “Chromebook license.” The license required that students reach certain benchmarks regarding general care, responsible use and cleaning before being allowed to take a Chromebook home.

The teachers and students were amazing as they learned side by side. As much support as was requested was provided from our central office who were actively involved in the initiative. The Chromebook pilot team provided support throughout the year and organized PD time embedded into the school day. Teachers took ownership for their own learning and developed and shared lessons, strategies, struggles and challenges.

As I reflect on the project I feel the biggest influence of its success has come from the lead team that was formed. This team was composed of two “lead teachers,” Jen and Michelle, the school’s teacher-librarian, Lisa, and myself. These three guided, reflected and made decisions in every school-based aspect of the initiative ensuring a process that was ultimately best for students and most effective for teachers. They spent countless hours organizing, supporting, learning, taking risks and creating. The team shared a common belief, vision and passion for integrating technology into the classroom in a meaningful way to enhance learning.

By surrounding myself with people with skills and knowledge superior to mine in many areas and by encouraging and supporting these teachers to lead, it made for an extremely rewarding, transformative and powerful project.

I live and work in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada as a school administrator in a grade seven to 12 school of just over 1200 students and approximately 65 teachers. I am a supporter of challenging the status quo, innovative thinking, creativity, positivity, taking risks, technology in the classroom and wellness.
Twitter @todd_samuelson
Blog http://toddsamuelson.blogspot.ca/

Saturday, June 30, 2012

Connecting as a New Principal

This week I am away on an offline vacation. Rather than let the blog be dormant or rerunning old posts I decided to give some other people a chance to share their experiences and ideas with you. I hope you enjoy the posts.


Having just completed my first year as building principal, I continue to hear the words of a former Science instructor at every turn, “The only thing constant is change.” As someone new to the world of Educational Administration, this phrase helps describe my first year as an Elementary Principal.  I use these words as guidance and continue to reflect upon them throughout the process. This past year I found many "changes" in store for me and no doubt for my staff as the principal of @HickoryHillElem, a K-6 building in Nebraska.

THE IMPORTANCE OF A PERSONAL LEARNING NETWORK

As a new principal, there are many "firsts" to experience throughout the course of a school year. Some take much time, consideration and thought, while some just happen and you must respond. No matter the situation, I have come to rely on several things while experiencing many of these these firsts. Never underestimate the power of your PLN (Personal Learning Network). My PLN serves many purposes; it is my support system, my personal trainer, my magic mirror, my coach/referee, and my charging station. As a new administrator I quickly realized the benefits of connecting with other educators and began expanding my PLN as a part of this process. While my network includes those within my own district team (13 Elementary Principals, Central Office and Building-Level Staff), I also began seeing the benefits of extending my connections beyond the walls of my own district.

It was at this point that I began making @Twitter work for me. Up until this point in my career I had a Twitter account and little understanding of the benefits it could provide. My network consisted of a few close friends and a few other "big name" leaders in the world of education. I would classify myself as a lurker and someone who was passively using the platform. I had little to no idea of where to begin and was only receiving information through those I followed. It was during the end of my first quarter as a principal and I was beginning to feel my ability to keep up on educational issues slipping and my energy for staying current with the most recent literature waning. This was not me and it was not who I wanted to be and I knew a change must take place.


Not fully knowing what I was about to get into, I sought out a local district resource Josh Allen, who was kind enough to put up with all of my questions; I began actively participating via Twitter and growing my PLN. I have found the following hashtags #satchat, #edchat, #edadmin, and #cpchat to fit my needs quite well. I have particularly connected with my Tweeps who participate in #satchat (meets Saturday morning 6:30am CST).

IMPACTS ON THOSE AROUND YOU

As an educator, it's o.k. to grow slowly, but it’s mandatory that you grow. Your PLN is a great support in this process. One great benefit I've reaped from a more active approach within my PLN has been my incorporation of and now reliance on @evernote. I have found Evernote to be a very effective tool when it comes to providing frequent, timely, and specific feedback to teachers & staff. While conducting formal walkthroughs and visiting classrooms Evernote allows me to meet these three requirements for effective feedback, allows me to record conversations with students and to take pictures of the classroom environment or student work. I am then able to instantly email this information back to the classroom teacher or staff and engage them in reflective conversation regarding the observation. It also allows me to create "notebooks" for each grade-level and organize my notes through the use of common "tags". This application allows me to foster collaboration throughout the school building by sharing the great things that are occurring within our classrooms on a daily basis. This promotes teacher connectedness, the development of internal capacity and a system that relies on the sharing of ideas and risk taking. I will continue to look for ways to maximize and enhance my use of Evernote as I move into the 2012-2013 school year.

I will leave you with a recommended reading that came to me via Twitter http://t.co/2ebC3wlB (7 Habits of Highly Effective Tech-leading Principals) by Jennifer Demski. The three interviewed educators in this article (@L_Hilt, @bhsprincipal & @NMHS_Principal) would make a great addition to your PLN and are definitely worth a "follow". Moving forward, I continue to read and reflect upon this article, the 7 Habits that are outlined and where I am in this process. Where are you in this process? Is Social Media and Tech integration a passing fad or here to stay? Remember, "the only thing constant is change."

About the Author
Josh Snyder is an Elementary Principal at @HickoryHillElem (K-6). He has a wonderfully supportive wife and two beautiful daughters. He is currently working in the EdD Ed Administration program through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln @Huskers. Josh also enjoys spending time with his family, reading, technology, fishing and golfing. He feels “Life is full of multiple learning opportunities.”

Twitter - @JoshLSnyder


Jennifer Demski (6/7/12) 7 Habits of Highly Effective Tech-leading Principals (the JOURNAL; Transforming Education Through Technology)

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/plugusin/7339375376/in/photostream/
bit.ly/temperedradical
Original Image Credit: Baseball by Paco Mexico
www.flickr.com/photos/pacomexico/3292574548/sizes/l/in/ph...
Licensed Creative Commons Attribution on May 22, 2012
Concept from The Method Method
www.amazon.com/The-Method-Obsessions-Start-up-Industry/dp...
Slide by Bill Ferriter
The Tempered Radical

Monday, July 27, 2009

Why Aren't You Having a Bigger Impact?

"Why Aren't You Having a Bigger Impact" was the opening slide of a breakfast presentation given by Scott McLeod at NECC 2009. I attended the session because I enjoy reading Scott's blog and because, as someone who would like to help my school's students and teachers become effective users of technology, the topic interested me.
If you were not able to attend the presentation, you can now watch it on Learning.com. You can also access the slides from the presentation here.

If you serve your school in any type of leadership role, but particularly if you serve in a technology role, the presentation is worth your time.