Showing posts with label lunar eclipse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lunar eclipse. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Three Good Videos About Solar Eclipses

On August 21st a solar eclipse will cover a large portion of the United States. If you're in an area that the eclipse will cover, you may want to have your students build solar eclipse viewing boxes. But before doing that, you may want to have your students review how eclipses happen. The following three videos are good for that purpose.

Of the three videos in this post, this one from Vox is the most detailed and is well suited to use in a flipped lesson tool like EDpuzzle.


If you need a short refresher to post in a classroom blog, the following video from the Washington Post is a good choice.


Finally, for elementary school classrooms, SciShow Kids offers the following lesson about solar eclipses. The shortcoming of this video is that it is based on the solar eclipse that covered parts of Europe in 2015. That might be a little confusing for some students.

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Video - Winter Solstice Lunar Eclipse

Depending on where you live last night or early this morning you could have observed a lunar eclipse. If you stayed in bed instead of watching it, you can see what it looked like through any number of videos of it posted on the web. One of the better ones I've seen, embedded below, is a time lapse video shot and produced by William Castleman. The video was captured in Gainseville, Florida.

Winter Solstice Lunar Eclipse from William Castleman on Vimeo.

A neat resource for teaching about the lunar eclipse is this simulation from Hey What's That? that uses the Google Earth browser plugin.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Solar Eclipse Simulation in Google Earth
NASA eClips - Educational Videos for K-12 Students
Explore Google Sky

Sunday, December 19, 2010

Hey What's That? - It's a Lunar Eclipse!

In a couple of days (December 21) there will be a lunar eclipse. Chances are you won't be with your students during the eclipse, but you can still work the event into your classroom through Hey What's That? Hey What's That? uses the Google Earth Plugin to create a simulation of the lunar eclipse. Using the simulation's timeline slider you can see how the sky should look at different times during the lunar eclipse.

H/T to Google Maps Mania.

Applications for Education
The simulation available on Hey What's That? could be a nice visual aid to help students understand how a lunar eclipse occurs. The simulation allows students to flip and spin the globe which could help them see why not all people on the Earth will see the eclipse.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Solar Eclipse Simulation in Google Earth
NASA eClips - Educational Videos for K-12 Students
Explore Google Sky