Showing posts with label multimedia presentation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label multimedia presentation. Show all posts

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Try Book Creator In Chrome to Create Multimedia Books

Book Creator is a one of the most popular iPad apps in schools. It's a fantastic app for creating multimedia stories. Now that platform is available in a web version too.

The Book Creator web version is currently in beta and open for teachers to use. Book Creator's web version supports creating multimedia books containing videos, images, drawings, and text. To create a book on Book Creator's web app just sign and choose a layout for your book. There are comic book layouts as well as traditional book layouts. After you have selected a layout for your book's pages you can add pictures and videos by either uploading them or by using your webcam. You can add text and drawings by using the drawing and typing tools built into Book Creator. Your completed book can be saved as a ePub or published online with a private Book Creator link.

Learn more about Book Creator's web app in the video below.



Applications for Education
Students can use Book Creator to create multimedia fiction stories, to publish non-fiction stories, or to create digital portfolios of their best work.

Friday, January 8, 2016

Three Neat Features of Buncee - Create Multimedia Stories

Buncee is a great tool for creating multimedia stories. Earlier this week two of Buncee's team members gave me a tour of all of the features available to teachers and students within the Buncee platform. Three features stood out to me during that tour. Those features are animations, integrated image search and citation, and hyperlinked writing.

What is a Buncee?
At its core a Buncee is essentially an online slideshow. But you can save your Buncee offline as an interactive PDF which makes it a great way for students to build ebooks. A Buncee can also be used as an online invitation to an event. When you have completed the creation of your Buncee you can select "RSVP" when you share it and recipients will have an option to register their interest in attending your event.

Three Neat Features of Buncee
Within Buncee there is an integrated image search which pulls images from Bing. The search is filtered for Creative Commons licensed images. Any image that a student chooses to use in his or her Buncee is automatically added to a list of citations.

Buncee has a huge catalog of stock images and animations that students can add to their slides. During the demonstration that I saw, a running dog animation was added to a slide. That animation played on a continuous loop until the slides were advanced.

All images and text added to a Buncee slide can be hyperlinked. Those links can be to webpage or, as I saw earlier this week, they could be to videos and or sound effects.

Check out the Buncee slides embedded below for a complete overview of all of the features available in Buncee.


Disclosure: Buncee is a client of MindRocket Media Group. I am a partner in MindRocket Media Group.

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Create Multimedia History Presentations With Digital Artifacts

The National Archives Experience Digital Vaults is one of the resources that I almost always share in my workshop on teaching history with technology primary sources. The Digital Vaults offers three good tools that students and teachers can use to create content using images and documents from the National Archives.

The National Archives Digital Vault poster and video creation tools allow students to drag and drop digital artifacts into a poster or video. The National Archives provides images, documents, and audio in an easy to use editor. When making a poster students can combine multiple images, change background colors, and create captions to make collages of digital artifacts. See the screen capture below for a demonstration of poster editing.

Creating a video is just as easy as creating a poster in the Digital Vaults. To create a video simply drag your selected images on to the editing templates, type image captions, select the duration of display for each image, and select audio tracks. See the screen capture below for a look at the video editor.

Applications for Education
The Pathways tool in the Digital Vaults can be used to create small quizzes that ask students to identify the connections between two or more images or documents. To start, drag one image to you Pathways menu then select a related item to add to your Pathway. Type in a clue for students to use to help them make the connection. When you share your Pathway with others, they will see only your first image and your connection clue, they have to find the image that connects. Take a look at a sample Pathways challenge here.

Please note that the Digital Vaults website loads a lot of media when you visit it for the first time. Give it ten seconds or so to load everything before you start to create and investigate. It also helps to be using an updated browser (Chrome or Firefox are best). 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Metta - Create Multimedia Presentations and Quizzes Online

Metta (formerly known as Soo Meta) is a new digital presentation tool that allows you to combine videos from YouTube, pictures from the web or from your desktop, text, and voice recordings to create a presentation. You can also pull-in content from Pinterest and Twitter to use in your final presentation. Metta also allows you to insert a quiz into your projects. This means that people viewing your Metta projects can watch a short video clip then answer questions about it before moving onto the next part of the presentation.


The Metta editor is fairly easy to use. Create a free account to get started then open your browser to Metta.io/create/ and title your first project. After giving your project a title, add a background image from your computer or from the web. Next pull in a video from YouTube. The video can be yours or any other publicly shared video. You can trim the start and the end time of the video in the Metta editor. To add text just click the text box in the editor and type. Finally, to narrate a frame (Metta calls them chapters) in your project click the microphone icon in the editor and make your recording. Completed Metta projects can be embedded into your blog or website.

Applications for Education
You could have students create Metta projects in which they create book trailers using video clips, images, and their voices. Students could use Metta to create a digital collage of media around a current events topic that they're studying. Metta might also be used by students to create a showcase of their best digital works of the semester.

Disclosure: Metta is an advertiser on Free Technology for Teachers. 

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Create 100 Frame Animations on ABCya Animate

ABCya Animate is a fun new tool from ABCya (disclosure, an advertiser here). ABCya Animate allows students to create animated GIFs containing up to 100 frames. On ABCya Animate students build their animation creations by drawing, typing, and inserting images. Students can change the background of each frame, include new pictures in each frame, and change the text in each frame of their animations.

The feature that I like best about ABCya Animate is that students can see the previous frames of their animations while working on a current frame. This helps students know where to position items in each frame in order to make their animations as smooth as possible. Students do not need to register on ABCya Animate in order to use the tool or to save their animations. When students click "save" on ABCya Animate their creations are downloaded as GIFs.

Applications for Education
ABCya Animate could be a great tool for elementary school and middle school students to use to create animations to use to tell a short story. For example, the animation that I started in the picture above could be the beginning of a short story about flying to visit grandparents. To complete the story I would add some drawings to represent my family and perhaps some text for clarification. Your students might also use short animations as part of larger multimedia project.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Best of 2013 So Far... Soo Meta

We're half-way through 2013. Like I've done in years past, this week I'll be featuring some of the best new tech tools of 2013 as well as some of the most popular posts of the year.

Soo Meta is a digital presentation tool from the same people that developed the YouTube remixing tool Dragon Tape. Soo Meta allows you to combine videos from YouTube, pictures from the web or from your desktop, text, and voice recordings to create a presentation. You can also pull content in from Pinterest and Twitter to use in your final product.

The Soo Meta editor is fairly easy to use. Create a free account to get started then open your browser to SooMeta.com/create/ and title your first project. After titling your project add a background image from your computer or from the web. Next pull in a video from YouTube. The video can be yours or any other publicly shared video. You can trim the start and the end time of the video in the Soo Meta editor. To add text just click the text box in the editor and type. Finally, to narrate a frame (Soo Meta calls them chapters) in your project click the microphone icon in the editor and make your recording. Completed Soo Meta projects can be embedded into your blog or website. I created a one chapter story about my dogs and embedded it below (press the green play button in the lower right corner).


Applications for Education
There are quite a few possible uses of Soo Meta in the classroom. You could have students create projects about in which they create book trailers using video clips, images, and their voices. Students could use Soo Meta to create a digital collage of media around a current events topic that they're studying. Soo Meta might also be used by students to create a showcase of their best digital works of the semester.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Insert Quizzes Into Videos With Soo Meta

Back in March I reviewed a neat multimedia presentation tool called Soo Meta. Soo Meta allows you to combine videos from YouTube, pictures from the web or from your desktop, text, and voice recordings to create a presentation. Yesterday, I learned that Soo Meta now allows you to insert a quiz into your projects. This means that people viewing your Soo Meta projects can watch a short video clip then answer questions about it before moving onto the next part of the presentation. Watch the sample below.


Applications for Education
Soo Meta could be a good tool for creating short flipped lessons for your students.

You could have students create projects in which they create book trailers using video clips, images, and their voices. Students could use Soo Meta to create a digital collage of media around a current events topic that they're studying. Soo Meta might also be used by students to create a showcase of their best digital works of the semester.

Monday, March 18, 2013

Soo Meta - A Nice, New Way to Create Multimedia Presentations

Soo Meta is a new digital presentation tool from the same people that developed the YouTube remixing tool Dragon Tape. Soo Meta allows you to combine videos from YouTube, pictures from the web or from your desktop, text, and voice recordings to create a presentation. You can also pull content in from Pinterest and Twitter to use in your final product.

The Soo Meta editor is fairly easy to use. Create a free account to get started then open your browser to SooMeta.com/create/ and title your first project. After titling your project add a background image from your computer or from the web. Next pull in a video from YouTube. The video can be yours or any other publicly shared video. You can trim the start and the end time of the video in the Soo Meta editor. To add text just click the text box in the editor and type. Finally, to narrate a frame (Soo Meta calls them chapters) in your project click the microphone icon in the editor and make your recording. Completed Soo Meta projects can be embedded into your blog or website. I created a one chapter story about my dogs and embedded it below (press the green play button in the lower right corner).


Applications for Education
There are quite a few possible uses of Soo Meta in the classroom. You could have students create projects about in which they create book trailers using video clips, images, and their voices. Students could use Soo Meta to create a digital collage of media around a current events topic that they're studying. Soo Meta might also be used by students to create a showcase of their best digital works of the semester.

Monday, February 11, 2013

Create an Audio Slideshow With Narrable

Narrable is a neat service for creating short narrated slideshows. Wes Fryer wrote a glowing review of Narrable and when Wes gives a service high marks I know that I have to try it out. My initial impression of Narrable is that it is kind of like VoiceThread mashed with Animoto.

To create an audio slideshow on Narrable start by uploading some pictures that you either want to talk about or have music played behind. After the pictures are uploaded you can record a narration for each picture through your computer's microphone or by calling into your Narrable's access phone number. You can also upload an audio recording that is stored on your computer. Narrable projects can be shared via email, Facebook, or by embedding them into a blog.


Applications for Education
Narrable could be a good way to get students to tell a short story by adding narration to pictures that they have taken or found online. Have students search for some Creative Commons licensed images arranged around topics that they're studying then record a short slideshow about them. 

Narrable allows you to have five projects for free. After that you can "earn" more free projects by sharing your projects on Facebook.

BrainyBox - Present Slides and More in a Cubed Format

BrainyBox is a new offering from Russel Tarr. Russel shared it with me last week and I finally had some time to try it this evening. I think that it might be a neat way for students to build and share multimedia slides on their tablets (including iPads) and computers.

BrainyBox provides six blank screens in which students can build slides that include text, videos (via embed codes), images, and hyperlinks. I also discovered that I could embed SoundCloud recordings and Google Maps into my screens. The finished product displays my slides as a cube that can embedded into a blog post or shared by directing people to the unique URL assigned to my project. All projects can be edited by their owners at any time.

Applications for Education
There are a couple of things that I like about BrainyBox for student use. First, students are limited to six slides so they have to be concise in telling their stories. Second, BrainyBox supports a lot of media formats so students have a variety of ways that they can tell their stories in those six slides.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Initial Impressions of Qwiki Creator

Last month I learned that Qwiki was launching a creation tool that allows users to create their own multimedia Qwikis. A Qwiki is a short narrated story that includes images, videos, and text. This morning I received my invitation to try out the new Qwiki Creator, these are my initial impressions.

Creating the basics of a Qwiki is very easy. There are three steps to the process; uploading content (or linking to hosted content like a Flickr image), recording narration, and captioning content. One of the things that I learned in my first attempt at creating a Qwiki is that the order in which you upload content is the order in which it will appear in your Qwiki. Perhaps I overlooked it, but I couldn't find a way to reorder my uploads. Voice recordings are limited to 20 seconds. You can also record with your webcam and have a video of yourself appear in your Qwiki. Captioning your content is very straight forward. After uploading content and making your recordings you're presented with a grid of all of your content to caption. Just fill in the blanks in the caption fields. The caption screen is where you can   insert links.

The Qwiki Creator browser bookmarklet, titled Qwik It!, is a handy little product that will help some students clip and organize content for their Qwiki projects. With Qwik It! installed students can clip sections of webpages and send them directly to their Qwiki Creator accounts. From there they can use the clipped content to build a Qwiki.

Applications for Education
I was hoping for a bit more from the Qwiki Creator, but despite some of its editing limitations it could be a good tool for students to use to create short multimedia stories. Students could create personal narratives using Qwiki Creator. Or you might have students create short introductory narratives about topics that they're studying in your classes.

If you want to see my first attempt at creating a Qwiki, you can watch it below.


Want to create your own Qwiki? Do it »

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Create Multimedia Reference Stories with Qwiki Creator

Last week in North Carolina I gave my popular Best of the Web presentation. In that presentation I included the multimedia reference site Qwiki. In case you haven't seen it before, Qwiki publishes narrated, illustrated, interactive reference entries. To use Qwiki, enter a topic in the search box or select a topic from the featured topics on the homepage. Then watch, listen, and read the Qwiki entry for that topic. Below your chosen Qwiki you will see a selection of related Qwiki entries. You can also find related materials by clicking the "Q" symbol that appears at the end of the Qwiki play bar.

Yesterday, through Steve Dembo I learned that Qwiki is now offering Qwiki Creator. Qwiki Creator (still only available by invitation) will allow users to create their own multimedia reference stories. Using Qwiki Creator you will be able to develop your story using videos, images, maps, and text. To lend your personality to the presentation, you can narrate the story. And like the already existing Qwiki entries, you will be able to make the story interactive. Qwiki Creator is also promising to be optimized for iPads.

A sample Qwiki is embedded below.

View Gaza Strip and over 3,000,000 other topics on Qwiki.

Applications for Education
Qwiki Creator has the potential to be a great way for students to organize and share information that they create on their own or information that they discover through research. I would love to see Qwiki Creator used as an alternative to the traditional book report assignment. Students could narrate a summary of the book and also add visuals that they think illustrate key points or characters in the stories that they read.

Friday, October 21, 2011

Picfull - Free and Easy Online Image Editing

Picfull is a free online photo editing service that I just learned about last night. To use the service just upload a picture and select an effect to add to it.  Picfull offers eighteen basic sets of effects. After you select an effect you can customize it to your liking. When you're finished altering your photo you can download or share it via Twitter, Facebook, or email.

Applications for Education
Picfull could be useful for students who have taken their own pictures to alter them to match the theme or purpose of a multimedia presentation that they create.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Playing With Media is a Great Blog and eBook About Remixing Media

Playing with Media is an ebook that Wesley Fryer is developing. To complement the development of that ebook, Wesley is maintaining a blog related to the topics to be included in the book. Most recently, Wesley posted a blog entry about How to Talk to Your Students About Copyright. In the blog you will find sections about working with text media, videos, audio media, and how to handle Copyright-related issues.

Applications for Education
Wesley Fryer's blog was one of the very first I ever added to my RSS Reader and now I'm going to add Playing With Media to my subscriptions too. Playing with Media is already an excellent resource for educators and is sure to get better as Wesley adds more to it. If you have questions about creating multimedia projects for your classroom, check out Playing with Media.

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

VoiceThread Mobile App Coming Soon

As I Tweeted this morning, the popular multimedia conversation tool VoiceThread has announced plans to launch a mobile app for iOS devices in the near future. Their blog post doesn't specify a date for its release, but hopefully it will be in time to use this fall. Watch, and comment if you like, on the VoiceThread about the mobile app embedded below.

Friday, June 17, 2011

Best of 2011 So Far - Qwiki

Now that my school year is over I'm taking a short fly fishing vacation. The posts for the rest of the week highlight my favorite resources of 2011 so far.

Qwiki is a multimedia encyclopedia containing more than three million entries. Qwiki publishes narrated, illustrated, interactive reference entries. To use Qwiki, enter a topic in the search box or select a topic from the featured topics on the homepage. Then watch, listen, and read the Qwiki entry for that topic. Below your chosen Qwiki you will see a selection of related Qwiki entries. You can also find related materials by clicking the "Q" symbol that appears at the end of the Qwiki play bar.

Qwikis can be embedded into your blog or website. Below I've embedded a Qwiki about archery.


And as the "wiki" in Qwiki implies, registered users can suggest videos and images to improve the reference entries. In the future registered users will be able to create their own Qwiki entries.

Applications for Education
Qwiki could be a fantastic way for students to all kinds of information. For a lot of "standard" curriculum topics, Qwiki's entries provide a more engaging format for learning about those topics than that offered by textbooks. What I'm really looking forward to though is the day when Qwiki lets users create their own entries to display on blogs and websites.

Monday, May 9, 2011

Web Doc - Multimedia Conversations Made Easy

Web Doc is a new service that is best described as a blog platform that offers rich multimedia commenting. If you've ever tried Tumblr, Web Doc will initial look familiar to you. Web Doc makes it easy to create a new post full of multiple media formats. Web Doc provides templates for  changing the visual background of each post, widgets for all kinds of purposes (calendar, games, etc), and of course lots of options for video and image display.

What makes Web Doc unique is that people who visit your Web Doc can reply with Web Docs of their own. In other words, the comments written in reply to your Web Doc can contain all of the rich multimedia elements that a Web Doc started from scratch can contain. This takes commenting to a new level compared to "traditional" blog platforms that only allow hyperlinks to be inserted into a comment.

Watch the video below to learn more and see Web Doc in action.

webdoc in action from webdoc on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
One way that I can envision Web Doc being used in the classroom is as a collaborative blog about current news events. One student could start a Web Doc by posting a news video he or she found online and writing a reflection on the video. The other students could then build the conversation by adding their own text, image, or video comments.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Aviary Offers 30 Days of Roc - New Sounds to Mix

Early last summer Aviary introduced a free tool called Roc for creating and remixing your own music loops. Everyday this month Aviary is adding new sounds to the Roc sound gallery. These sounds can be used to create new music using the online Roc music creator. So far four new sound packs have been added to the gallery. These new sounds include "human beat box," "body sounds," "kitchen sounds," and "around the house."

Roc, which is similar to Aviary's Myna audio editor, is a cloud-based tool for mixing sounds. Completed Roc projects can be downloaded for use in podcasts, videos, and other multimedia projects. Roc can also be integrated into your Google Apps account through the Google Apps Marketplace. Watch an overview of how Roc works in the video below.

Roc 101: Introduction from Mizagorn on Vimeo.

Applications for Education
When having students create multimedia projects, the best way to avoid any concerns associated with Copyrighted music is to have students use their own creations. Roc is a good free tool that students can use to create their own music for their multimedia presentations. And because Roc operates entirely online students can work on their music creations from their home computers, school computers, or public library computers.

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Wow! Qwiki is Engaging

In the last 48 hours since they opened up to the world, I've had numerous people tell me that I had to check out Qwiki. I finally did check it out this afternoon and all I can say is "wow!"

Qwiki is a multimedia encyclopedia containing more than three million entries. Qwiki publishes narrated, illustrated, interactive reference entries. To use Qwiki, enter a topic in the search box or select a topic from the featured topics on the homepage. Then watch, listen, and read the Qwiki entry for that topic. Below your chosen Qwiki you will see a selection of related Qwiki entries. You can also find related materials by clicking the "Q" symbol that appears at the end of the Qwiki play bar.

Qwikis can be embedded into your blog or website. Below I've embedded a Qwiki about archery.


And as the "wiki" in Qwiki implies, registered users can suggest videos and images to improve the reference entries. In the future registered users will be able to create their own Qwiki entries.

Applications for Education
Qwiki could be a fantastic way for students to all kinds of information. For a lot of "standard" curriculum topics, Qwiki's entries provide a more engaging format for learning about those topics than that offered by textbooks. What I'm really looking forward to though is the day when Qwiki lets users create their own entries to display on blogs and websites.

Friday, December 24, 2010

UJAM - Record Your Own Music Online

UJAM is a new service that aims to make everyone a singing sensation. Okay, so it might not make you a singing sensation, but it could help you create music tracks that you can share with friends and use in multimedia productions.

Here's how UJAM works; you sing or play an instrument while recording to UJAM. When you're done recording, use UJAM to alter the sound quality of your voice, turn your voice into other sounds, adjust the tempo of your song, and or remix a song to include your recording. UJAM is essentially an online, light weight version, of Garage Band. Watch the video below to learn more and see UJAM in action.


Applications for Education
UJAM could be useful for students to use to create music tracks to include in multimedia productions like documentaries, short story videos, or as background on a Glogster project.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Three Ways to Cut, Mix, and Mash YouTube Videos
12 Ways to Create Videos Without a Camera or Software
Free Guide - Making Videos on the Web