Showing posts with label music theory. Show all posts
Showing posts with label music theory. Show all posts

Monday, January 25, 2021

Citizen DJ - A Free Tool for Remixing Music and Spoken Audio

Citizen DJ is a free tool for remixing and creating new songs from audio files that are in the public domain. The tool was developed by Brian Foo who is an Innovator in Residence at the Library of Congress

On the Citizen DJ website you will find large collections of audio files that are in the public domain. Pick one of the collections to start remixing a song or spoken audio track with drum tracks. Citizen DJ lets you select and isolate notes and rhythms from an audio recording to then mix with drum tracks that you can also remix. You can mix and match as much or as little as you like. When you've developed a remix that you like you can record it and save it as an audio file on your computer. Watch the video below that was created by Brian Foo to learn more about how Citizen DJ works (those viewing this in RSS or email may need to click through to see the video). 


Applications for Education
My first thought when I tried Citizen DJ was that it could be a good tool for music teachers to have students use to experiment with rhythms and sounds. 

Another way to use it would be to have students create remixes to use as sound tracks in video or podcast projects. All of the music and spoken audio files available through Citizen DJ are free to use and remix which means the new works that students create will also be free of copyright restrictions. 

Thursday, August 10, 2017

25,000 78 RPM Records for Your Listening Pleasure

A few years ago I spent time preparing my grandparents' home to be sold. In the process my uncles and I came across many artifacts of a bygone era in American culture. Included in those artifacts were some 78RPM records. Unfortunately, lacking a record player we weren't able to play the records. But today there is a good chance that the music on those records can be heard through the Internet Archive.

Today, through Open Culture, I learned that the Internet Archive hosts a collection of digitized recordings from more than 25,000 78 RPM records. You can search, browse, and listen to everything in the collection made possible through The Great 78 Project. The recordings can be downloaded, streamed, and embedded into blog posts as I have done below.


Applications for Education
This collection could be a great resource for music teachers who are looking for samples to use in music appreciation lessons or courses like the History of Jazz course that I enjoyed as an undergrad.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Free Online Music Theory Lessons

MusicTheory.net offers free online music theory lessons covering everything from basic note recognition to difficult chord inversions. Each activity on the site provides instant feedback. The exercises can be customized to test users on the notes and concepts they need to practice the most. Scroll to the bottom of the exercises page to find the customization options. MusicTheory.net also offers calculators and tools handy for composing music. And if you just need some staff paper, MusicTheory.net offers sheet music that you can print.

Applications for Education
MusicTheory.net's lessons and practice activities offer a range of difficulty wide enough for the site to be used by brand new music students and older music students alike.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Free Ebook - Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People

Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People is a free ebook created by Toby Rush at the University of Dayton. The ebook covers everything from the basics of reading key signatures to advanced topics in composition.

Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People can be downloaded in parts or in whole. It is released under a Creative Commons license that allows you to use it for instruction.

H/T to Lifehacker.

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Create Live Music on the Web With Your Friends

Jam With Chrome is a fun new Google web tool. On Jam With Chrome (only works if you use the Chrome browser) you can play nineteen virtual instruments. Jams can have four musicians playing together in real-time over the web. It's an application that I had a bit of fun playing with this evening. Unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be a native recording application built into Jam With Chrome. You could use a screencasting tool like Jing or Screenr to record your jam session.


Applications for Education
Jam With Chrome could be a fun app for students to use to practice improvising jams in a music appreciation course.

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Print Your Own Blank Sheet Music

Blank Sheet Music.net allows you to create your own blank sheet music. Before printing you can select the key signature, time signature, number of staves per set, sets per sheet, and the cleff.

Applications for Education
Blank Sheet Music could be a handy resource for music teachers, particularly music theory and music composition teachers. I remember my high school band teacher (Mr. Berry) complaining about the inflated cost of sheet music. Blank Sheet Music could be a cost saving resource for music educators. 

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Interactive Music Theory Lessons

I wrote about Ricci Adams' MusicTheory.net a couple of years ago, but since then some new things have been added to it that are worth noting. MusicTheory.net still offers music theory lessons covering everything from basic note recognition to difficult chord inversions. The lessons can now be customized to test users on the notes and concepts they need to practice the most. MusicTheory.net also offers calculators and tools handy for composing music. And if you just need some staff paper, MusicTheory.net offers sheets that you can print.
Applications for Education
MusicTheory.net's lessons and practice activities offer a range of difficulty wide enough for the site to be used by brand new music students and older music students alike.