Showing posts with label panoramic images. Show all posts
Showing posts with label panoramic images. Show all posts

Friday, February 7, 2014

AirPano - Gorgeous 360 Degree Virtual Tours of the World

AirPano is a fantastic site for viewing gorgeous 360 degree imagery of dozens of famous landmarks and cities all over the world. I initially reviewed the site a couple of years ago. Recently, I noticed that AirPano has added some new features to go along with an expansion of their galleries.

Much of the AirPano imagery now includes interactive pinmarks that you can click to learn more about the places you're seeing in the AirPano imagery. For example, if you visit the AirPano imagery of Petra you can click the pinmarks to learn about the construction of Petra and the significance of various carvings seen throughout the virtual tour.

AirPano now offers videos along with 360 degree imagery. The videos aren't interactive like the pictures are, but they do provide a great visual overview of cities and landscapes.

Applications for Education
Using AirPano imagery for virtual tours could be a good way for students to explore the places they're reading about in a social studies lesson or places they've read about during a literature lesson. AirPano imagery is available in a variety of resolutions to accommodate visitors using slower Internet connections and visitors using the site on iPads or Android tablets.

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

View Mars Panoramas and More

Last week I posted a short history of Mars exploration. This evening I explored a couple of more resources about Mars.

On 360 Cities you can view a panorama created from some images captured by Curiosity. On your laptop or desktop you can zoom in, zoom out, and pan around in 360 degrees. As I learned from this CNET article, on your iPad you can do the same by simply moving your iPad around.

The Mars Science Laboratory has many images of Mars captured by Curiosity as well as videos related to the rover's exploration of the Red Planet. I like this animated demonstration of how NASA communicates with Curiosity.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Panoramas on Mars

Google Earth isn't limited to just views of the Earth. You can also view Mars and the Moon in Google Earth. You can take tours of Mars and view panoramic imagery of Mars in Google Earth. But if you don't have Google Earth installed on your computer you're not excluded from viewing the panoramas. Recently, through Google Maps Mania, I learned about a site that is publishing panoramic imagery of Mars.

TripGeo hosts some panoramic imagery that can be viewed online without having Google Earth installed on your computer. The imagery comes from various NASA missions to Mars. The coding was done by Keir Clarke (the blogger at Google Maps Mania) and Rob McMahon.




Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Glacier Works - Before and After Glacier Images

Glacier Works is a non-profit organization studying the shrinking glaciers of the Himalaya and the impact of glacier melt on the people of the region. One of the neat features of the Glacier Works website is the panoramic before and after images. The panoramas show images of the glaciers from the 1920's side-by-side with recent images. You can quickly compare the two views by sliding your cursor across the panoramas.

Applications for Education
If you're teaching lessons on climate change and geography the Glacier Works panoramas could be a nice way to show students how climate change effects a region.

Monday, March 5, 2012

11 Ways to Find and View Panoramic Images

Thanks to developments in camera and web technology it has become quite easy to capture panoramic imagery. Panoramic imagery provides viewers of a better sense of the view one experiences when standing in a location. For example, a panorama of the Grand Canyon is more informative than a standard image view. Here are some great places where you can find panoramic imagery online.

AirPano offers dozens of spectacular 360 panoramas of famous landmarks and cities around the world. The AirPano panoramas can be set to auto-play with a music accompaniment or you can navigate the panoramas manually. To find a panorama on AirPano you can browse the listings, search by keyword, or view a Google Map of all of the places AirPano has capturedAirPano panoramas can be viewed in high or low resolution according to the speed of your Internet connection. The panoramas can be viewed on an iPad. You can also view the AirPano files in Google Earth.

Panoguide is a site on which users can browse through galleries geolocated on a Google Map. For students and teachers who would like to contribute panoramic images of their own to the gallery, Panoguide provides detailed directions on how to get started. Panoguide also provides user discussion forums through which you can learn even more about creating good panoramic images.

Patrimonium-mundi.org is undertaking an ambitious project to capture and share 360 degree panoramas of all of the UNESCO World Heritage sites. Currently, Patrimonium-mundi.org is up to 277 panoramic images of World Heritage sites. Visitors can rotate all of the images and some of the images allow you to zoom in and zoom out to look at the details of World Heritage sites. You can locate panoramas by browsing the world map or by searching for a site in the search box.

Tours from Above hosts panoramic aerial imagery of cities and landmarks around the world. In all there are 49 panoramic aerial views of places and landmarks including the Eifel Tower, Victoria Falls, and various sites throughout New York. You can locate imagery by choosing from a drop-down menu or by selecting placemarks on the Tours from Above Google Map.

Vista Zoo is a Google Map featuring 3D panoramic tours of more than 1400 locations around the globe. The Vista name comes from the 3DVista products used to construct the 3D panoramic images shown on the map. Click on any placemark on the map to be taken to a collection of 3D panoramic images of that location. In some cases there is sound to accompany the panoramas.

Arounder is a free site that offers 3D views of famous places in European cities, North American locations, and the Moon. The imagery is very clear and detailed. Visitors can explore 360 degrees of each image using the simple navigation tools that appear at the bottom of every image. When you're on the Arounder homepage click on a city to see a map of that city. Then click on the red(ish) placemark icons to explore the imagery.

360 Cities provides extremely clear panoramic imagery of places around the world. The bulk of the images are of places in Europe, but there is also some great imagery from North America, South America, Africa, and Asia. The panoramic imagery of 360 Cities is so clear and transitions so smoothly that I almost made myself dizzy while playing around with imagery of Atlanta, Georgia. Images on 360 Cities can be explored online using the Google Map provided on the 360 Cities website or you can view the imagery in the 360 Cities Google Earth layer. 360 Cities imagery can also be embedded into your blog or website.

View At provides panoramic views of dozens of notable places from around the world. The panoramic views can be viewed on the View At website or viewed in Google Earth. Although they offer different views, in many ways View At is similar to 360 Cities.
Panoramas.dk hosts dozens of interactive panoramas from around the world. The panorama that must have been the most difficult to capture is this view from the peak of Mount Everest. The list of interactive panoramas includes views of cultural festivals and tourist attractions. The database of US panoramic views includes the Grand Canyon, the Jefferson Memorial, and two dozen other panoramas.

Bing Maps Streetside Views for desktop browsers contains street level panoramic images. The Streetside Views offer panoramic views of city streets and landmarks. In Streetside Views you can slide through the panoramas to virtually tour streets in major U.S. cities. The Streetside View includes an overlay of business names and street names when available. Here's a landmark in Streetside View for all of my fellow Red Sox fans.

History Buff is a neat website that teachers of US History should spend some time exploring. One of the best features of History Buff is a set of fifteen narrated panoramic tours of interesting and significant historic sites. Some of the panoramas you will find in the collection include Davy Crockett's childhood home, Appomattox Courthouse, Thomas Edison's birthplace, and Valley Forge.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Spectacular 360 Degree Panoramas of Famous Places

AirPano is a great website that I learned about through a Facebook post by James Hollis. AirPano offers dozens of spectacular 360 panoramas of famous landmarks and cities around the world. The AirPano panoramas can be set to auto-play with a music accompaniment or you can navigate the panoramas manually. To find a panorama on AirPano you can browse the listings, search by keyword, or view a Google Map of all of the places AirPano has captured.

AirPano panoramas can be viewed in high or low resolution according to the speed of your Internet connection. The panoramas can be viewed on an iPad. You can also view the AirPano files in Google Earth.

Applications for Education
Having students open the AirPano files in Google Earth could be a good way for them to explore cities and landmarks in their correct geographic settings. AirPano's panoramas are well-suited to viewing and navigating on a touch screen computers and interactive whiteboards.

Saturday, August 13, 2011

CleVR - Create Your Own Panoramic Image Tours

CleVR is an Adobe Air application that allows you to take a set of images and stitch them together to create a panoramic image. The panoramic image you create can be rotated side to side, up and down, and zoomed in and out. To use the image editor you can drag and drop images onto your CleVR clipboard or upload to your clipboard. You select the sequence of the images and CleVR stitches them together to make your panorama. Your finished product can be posted on the CleVR website or embedded into your own website or blog.

When I tried CleVR I learned through trial and error, that you do have to have to play around with the sequence of images in order to get a quality product. As with most applications of this type, the larger the image size and higher the quality of the images, the slower your images are processed. CleVR would probably be frustrating to try to use with elementary school students. Most middle school and high school students should be able to create nice panoramic images with CleVR.

Applications for EducationCleVR could be a clever way to have students add panoramic images to virtual tours they build in Google Maps. Students can link to the images or insert the images into placemarks on Google Maps.