Showing posts with label panoramic views. Show all posts
Showing posts with label panoramic views. Show all posts

Monday, March 5, 2012

11 Ways to Find and View Panoramic Images

Thanks to developments in camera and web technology it has become quite easy to capture panoramic imagery. Panoramic imagery provides viewers of a better sense of the view one experiences when standing in a location. For example, a panorama of the Grand Canyon is more informative than a standard image view. Here are some great places where you can find panoramic imagery online.

AirPano offers dozens of spectacular 360 panoramas of famous landmarks and cities around the world. The AirPano panoramas can be set to auto-play with a music accompaniment or you can navigate the panoramas manually. To find a panorama on AirPano you can browse the listings, search by keyword, or view a Google Map of all of the places AirPano has capturedAirPano panoramas can be viewed in high or low resolution according to the speed of your Internet connection. The panoramas can be viewed on an iPad. You can also view the AirPano files in Google Earth.

Panoguide is a site on which users can browse through galleries geolocated on a Google Map. For students and teachers who would like to contribute panoramic images of their own to the gallery, Panoguide provides detailed directions on how to get started. Panoguide also provides user discussion forums through which you can learn even more about creating good panoramic images.

Patrimonium-mundi.org is undertaking an ambitious project to capture and share 360 degree panoramas of all of the UNESCO World Heritage sites. Currently, Patrimonium-mundi.org is up to 277 panoramic images of World Heritage sites. Visitors can rotate all of the images and some of the images allow you to zoom in and zoom out to look at the details of World Heritage sites. You can locate panoramas by browsing the world map or by searching for a site in the search box.

Tours from Above hosts panoramic aerial imagery of cities and landmarks around the world. In all there are 49 panoramic aerial views of places and landmarks including the Eifel Tower, Victoria Falls, and various sites throughout New York. You can locate imagery by choosing from a drop-down menu or by selecting placemarks on the Tours from Above Google Map.

Vista Zoo is a Google Map featuring 3D panoramic tours of more than 1400 locations around the globe. The Vista name comes from the 3DVista products used to construct the 3D panoramic images shown on the map. Click on any placemark on the map to be taken to a collection of 3D panoramic images of that location. In some cases there is sound to accompany the panoramas.

Arounder is a free site that offers 3D views of famous places in European cities, North American locations, and the Moon. The imagery is very clear and detailed. Visitors can explore 360 degrees of each image using the simple navigation tools that appear at the bottom of every image. When you're on the Arounder homepage click on a city to see a map of that city. Then click on the red(ish) placemark icons to explore the imagery.

360 Cities provides extremely clear panoramic imagery of places around the world. The bulk of the images are of places in Europe, but there is also some great imagery from North America, South America, Africa, and Asia. The panoramic imagery of 360 Cities is so clear and transitions so smoothly that I almost made myself dizzy while playing around with imagery of Atlanta, Georgia. Images on 360 Cities can be explored online using the Google Map provided on the 360 Cities website or you can view the imagery in the 360 Cities Google Earth layer. 360 Cities imagery can also be embedded into your blog or website.

View At provides panoramic views of dozens of notable places from around the world. The panoramic views can be viewed on the View At website or viewed in Google Earth. Although they offer different views, in many ways View At is similar to 360 Cities.
Panoramas.dk hosts dozens of interactive panoramas from around the world. The panorama that must have been the most difficult to capture is this view from the peak of Mount Everest. The list of interactive panoramas includes views of cultural festivals and tourist attractions. The database of US panoramic views includes the Grand Canyon, the Jefferson Memorial, and two dozen other panoramas.

Bing Maps Streetside Views for desktop browsers contains street level panoramic images. The Streetside Views offer panoramic views of city streets and landmarks. In Streetside Views you can slide through the panoramas to virtually tour streets in major U.S. cities. The Streetside View includes an overlay of business names and street names when available. Here's a landmark in Streetside View for all of my fellow Red Sox fans.

History Buff is a neat website that teachers of US History should spend some time exploring. One of the best features of History Buff is a set of fifteen narrated panoramic tours of interesting and significant historic sites. Some of the panoramas you will find in the collection include Davy Crockett's childhood home, Appomattox Courthouse, Thomas Edison's birthplace, and Valley Forge.

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Panoguide -View Panoramas and Learn How to Create Them

I've previously written about some good sites for viewing panoramic images here, here, and here. I like panoramic images that can be zoomed and scrolled through because compared to standard images they provide students with a better sense of what a place really looks like.

Panoguide is another site on which users can browse through galleries geolocated on a Google Map. For students and teachers who would like to contribute panoramic images of their own to the gallery, Panoguide provides detailed directions on how to get started. Panoguide also provides user discussion forums through which you can learn even more about creating good panoramic images.

Applications for Education
Creating panoramic images of sites in their communities could be a good activity for both photography students and geography students. Specifically, I'm thinking that students at my school could create panoramic images of some of the lakes and mountain tops in our community. Panoguide could provide the direction needed to get some students and teachers on their way to doing just that.

Friday, April 22, 2011

360 Degree Panoramas of 275 World Heritage Sites

Patrimonium-mundi.org is undertaking an ambitious project to capture and share 360 degree panoramas of all of the UNESCO World Heritage sites. Currently, Patrimonium-mundi.org is up to 275 panoramic images of World Heritage sites. Visitors can rotate all of the images and some of the images allow you to zoom in and zoom out to look at the details of World Heritage sites. You can locate panoramas by browsing the world map or by searching for a site in the search box.

Applications for Education
Patrimonium-mundi.org could be a excellent supplement to your geography lessons. Students could explore the images on their own or you could use the images as conversation starters in your lessons.

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Tours from Above - Aerial Views of Cities

Tours from Above hosts panoramic aerial imagery of cities and landmarks around the world. In all there are 49 panoramic aerial views of places and landmarks including the Eifel Tower, Victoria Falls, and various sites throughout New York. You can locate imagery by choosing from a drop-down menu or by selecting placemarks on the Tours from Above Google Map.

Image from Seattle, Washington USA

Applications for Education
One of the avantages of tools like Google Maps, Google Earth, and Tours from Above over standard textbook maps is that students can visually explore places in more detail than is available on a printed map.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
4 Ways to View the World in Panoramic
Vista Zoo - Panoramic Tours in Google Maps

Monday, November 15, 2010

View New Panoramic Photos in Google Earth

For quite a while Google Earth has had a layer called 360 Cities that features spherical imagery of many interesting and historic sites around the world. On Friday, Google announced that they've added even more an better panoramic imagery to their standard Google Earth layers.

The new panoramic imagery is a part of the standard "photos layer" in the "primary database." Standard Panoramio images still display as they always did as little blue/white outlined boxes. Now when you turn on the photos layer you will also see red outlined squares. Those red outlined squares indicate panoramic images.

Accessing panoramic views for Acadia National Park.














Part of the panoramic view from the top of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park.












Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Google Earth Across the Curriculum
Trip Line - Create Travel Maps
Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Vista Zoo - Panoramic Tours on Google Maps

Vista Zoo is a Google Map featuring 3D panoramic tours of more than 1400 locations around the globe. The Vista name comes from the 3DVista products used to construct the 3D panoramic images shown on the map. Click on any placemark on the map to be taken to a collection of 3D panoramic images of that location. In some cases there is sound to accompany the panoramas.

Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the link.

Applications for Education
Much like Google Street View or 360 Cities, Vista Zoo offers students a way to explore places far away from their homes. Exploring the panoramas is far better than simply looking at static images in a textbook.

Here are some related items that may be of interest to you:
Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms
Maps of War - Animated Thematic Maps
4 Ways to View the World in Panoramic

Thursday, June 10, 2010

4 Ways to View the World in Panoramic

Google Maps Streetview provides a great way for students to explore cities and interesting places around the world. As good as Streetview is, it isn't available for all places (like the peak of Mount Everest) and sometimes even where it is available it leaves something to be desired. Here are four sites and services featuring high-quality panoramic and interactive imagery of famous and interesting places around the world.

Arounder is a free site that offers 3D views of famous places in European cities, North American locations, and the Moon. The imagery is very clear and detailed. Visitors can explore 360 degrees of each image using the simple navigation tools that appear at the bottom of every image. When you're on the Arounder homepage click on a city to see a map of that city. Then click on the red(ish) placemark icons to explore the imagery.

360 Cities provides extremely clear panoramic imagery of places around the world. The bulk of the images are of places in Europe, but there is also some great imagery from North America, South America, Africa, and Asia. The panoramic imagery of 360 Cities is so clear and transitions so smoothly that I almost made myself dizzy while playing around with imagery of Atlanta, Georgia. Images on 360 Cities can be explored online using the Google Map provided on the 360 Cities website or you can view the imagery in the 360 Cities Google Earth layer. 360 Cities imagery can also be embedded into your blog or website.

View At provides panoramic views of dozens of notable places from around the world. The panoramic views can be viewed on the View At website or viewed in Google Earth. Although they offer different views, in many ways View At is similar to 360 Cities.

Panoramas.dk hosts dozens of interactive panoramas from around the world. The panorama that must have been the most difficult to capture is this view from the peak of Mount Everest. The list of interactive panoramas includes views of cultural festivals and tourist attractions. The database of US panoramic views includes the Grand Canyon, the Jefferson Memorial, and two dozen other panoramas.

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Vuvox - Create Multimedia Panoramic Slideshows

Vuvox is a multifaceted multimedia collage and slideshow creation tool. There are so many great tools including in Vuvox that it is tough to choose a feature with to start this review. The basic idea of Vuvox is to allow anyone to create a multimedia panoramic collage. At its most basic level you can use Vuvox to stitch together your photographs into a panorama. Vuvox offers great tools that you can use to edit your images so that they match up perfectly. You can also use the Vuvox editing tools to crop out sections of an image for re-use later in your collage or for use in a separate collage. You can upload images from your computer to Vuvox or import images from your Flickr, SmugMug, or Picasa account.

The multimedia aspect of Vuvox allows you to include video in your collage. You can insert the video into any place on your Vuvox collage. In the sample I created and embedded below you will find a video inserted toward the end of the slideshow. Arranging image and video elements in a Vuvox slideshow is a simple matter of drag and dropping them into the sequence you desire.

There are three free versions of Vuvox. Vuvox Express offers the fastest way to create, but has the fewest options. Vuvox Studio is the most advanced option offering broadest selection of editing tools. Vuvox Collage is the middle ground between Express and Studio.



Applications for Education
Vuvox could be an excellent tool for students to use to create multimedia presentations. Students could use Vuvox to create a documentary-style slideshow that includes images and video. I'm planning to do some more work with Vuvox and will probably have my US History students using it this fall.

Here are some related resources that may be of interest to you:
Remix America - Make Your Own US History Documentaries
Remix the News on Link TV
How-to Week, Day 5 - Using Animoto and VoiceThread

Friday, July 10, 2009

View At - The World in Panoramic

Virtual tours and panoramic views can be a great way to move geography lessons beyond simple "studying a map" exercises. View At provides panoramic views of dozens of notable places from around the world. The panoramic views can be viewed on the View At website or viewed in Google Earth. Although they offer different views, in many ways View At is similar to the 360 Cities panoramic views.

Applications for Education
View At, like 360 Cities, could be a good tool for supplementing geography, history, and culture lessons. Students can individually explore the images in a way that is not possible with textbook photographs.

Here is a related resource that may be of interest to you:
360 Degree View from the Peak of Mt. Everest