Showing posts with label practical ed tech newsletter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label practical ed tech newsletter. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 24, 2023

The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter

Between social media and email it can be hard to keep up with everything going on in the world of ed tech throughout the week. That's why nine years ago I started the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. Every Sunday evening/ Monday morning I send out my favorite tip of the week and summary of my most popular posts of the previous week. 

Weekly Newsletter

In my Practical Ed Tech Newsletter I also usually include a personal note like the fun I had in my 171 year old attic or I make fun pop culture reference like "were Ross and Rachel really on a break?" The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week newsletter is also where I usually publish handouts like my guide to finding classroom-friendly media before I publish it anywhere else. 

Click here to subscribe to the Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week

Sunday, November 27, 2022

Three YouTube Features Every Teacher Should Know How to Use

In last week's Practical Ed Tech Newsletter I detailed a few features of YouTube Studio that every teacher who uploads videos to YouTube should know how to use. The video included in that newsletter can be seen here. Chances are that even if you don't upload videos to YouTube, you probably use YouTube to find and show videos in your classroom from time to time. If that's the case for you, there are some features of YouTube that you should know how to use. 

In this new video I highlight the features of YouTube that you should know how to use before showing a video in your classroom. Those features include adjusting the size and color scheme of subtitles, accessing and saving a transcript of videos, and clipping sections of YouTube videos.  

Three YouTube Features Every Teacher Should Know How to Use

Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Free Email Etiquette Posters

In this week's Practical Ed Tech Newsletter I shared a bunch of resources for teaching about digital citizenship. In that newsletter I included a link to two posters about email etiquette that I created last fall. I also mentioned that Canva is running a free poster printing promotion later this month. 

You can get PDFs of my email etiquette posters for free right here. Once you've downloaded the PDFs you can then import them into your Canva for Education account. Then on August 26th you can request professional printing of the posters from your Canva for Education account. Watch my short video below to learn how to download my email etiquette posters and import them into your Canva account. 



Disclaimer: I do not have any current affiliation with Canva. Read all of the fine print on Canva's offer to find out if you meet the eligibility requirements for their free poster printing offer.

Friday, October 15, 2021

Fifteen Exit Ticket Questions for Almost Any Classroom

This is an excerpt from this week's Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. The newsletter is sent every Sunday evening (Eastern Time) and it includes my tip of the week and summary of the week's most popular posts from Free Technology for Teachers. You can sign up for the newsletter right here. 

Whether an exit ticket is conducted with digital tools or on scraps of paper (a strategy I abandoned years ago because I always seemed to misplaced a paper or two), strategy is the same. I try to ask questions that aren't "yes/ no" but can still be answered by all students in just a minute or two. To that end, here's a list of general purpose exit ticket questions that I developed and have used at various times in my career.

1. What’s a new-to-you word or term you heard today?

2. What’s one thing you’d change about today’s lesson?

3. How did today’s lesson make you feel?
 
4. How well do you think you’d do if we had a quiz next week?
 
5. How would you describe today’s lesson to a classmate who was absent?

6. What was your favorite part of today’s lesson?

7. What surprised you about today’s class?
 
8. What’s something you wish was different in class?
 
9. What’s one question you’d put on a quiz about today’s lesson?
 
10. How would you help a classmate who didn’t understand today’s lesson?
 
11. What’s one thing you’d like to learn more about?
 
12. What was the easiest part of today’s class?
 
13. How did today’s lesson fit with the one before it?
 
14. What do you think the next lesson will be about?
 
15. What was the hardest part of today’s class?

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

My Top Five Productivity Tips

This is an excerpt from my weekly Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week Newsletter. The newsletter is sent out every Sunday evening (Eastern Time). In my newsletter you'll find my favorite tip of the week as well as a list of my most popular posts of the week. You can register for the newsletter right here

Can Your Comments
I find that I answer the same questions fairly often in my email. Likewise, when giving students feedback on assignments I can often use the same comment from assignment to assignment and from student to student. Therefore, I have message templates stored in my inbox and have re-usable comments stored in Google Classroom.

If you’re an Outlook user, you can also create canned responses to use to answer frequently asked questions in your email. 

(My newsletter contained directions for creating canned comments in Gmail and Outlook). 

Ignore Email…
This is one of many productivity tips that I picked up while reading Cal Newport’s Deep Work. Don’t ignore your email completely. Just ignore it until you actually have time to read it and respond to it. (My newsletter contained more information on this habit).

Use Filters
When it is time to tackle my inbox, I have some filters in place that help me prioritize messages landing in my inbox. (My newsletter contain more details and directions on this).

Automate Everything
When planning your week, use email scheduling and assignment scheduling so that you don’t have to manually send messages every day. Every popular LMS (learning management system) contains a scheduling tool that you can use to write up a list of assignments and have them distributed on a schedule over the course of a week or month. Gmail users, you can schedule messages to be sent in the future. (My newsletter contained more information including tutorials on automation).

A Big Things List
My to-do list doesn’t include little things like “take kids to school” because that’s something that has to be done and can’t be put off for “later.” My to-do list has things that could be put off, but that I’d feel unproductive if I did put them off. For example, right now I’m trying with all my might to finish a big writing project. So on my to-do list I put “write 1,000 words.” It doesn’t have to get done that day, but I feel a lot more productive when I do get it done.

Monday, September 13, 2021

A Simple Trick to Make Audio Editing Easier

In this week's Practical Ed Tech Newsletter I featured five podcasting tips for students and teachers. One of those tips was to "clap and pause." That tip is demonstrated in the short video that is embedded below. 

Editing an audio recording is much easier if you make a loud clap before a brief pause and then begin speaking. The same is true if you need to pause while recording. That clap will be easy to hear and will be easy to see in audio editing tools. In audio editing tools like Audacity and GarageBand that clap and pause will be identified by a big visual spike followed by a steep drop. You won’t need to listen through the whole recording to find the places you need to edit because you’ll see them in the audio editor.

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

20,000 Teachers Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

About seven years ago I noticed that "too many updates" was the most common reason for people unsubscribing from the emails from this blog. To remedy that I created the Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week Newsletter. What started out small now has more than 20,000 weekly subscribers. 

The Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week newsletter features my favorite tip of the week along with a summary of the most popular blog posts from my blogs FreeTech4Teachers.com, PracticalEdTech.com, and EdTechFitness.com. The newsletter is emailed on Sunday evening/ Monday morning (depending on your time zone). Some of the newsletters include Google Docs and PDFs that aren't published elsewhere. 

Those of you who read FreeTech4Teachers.com via email will be pleased to know that the Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week email is published manually which means that unlike the FreeTech4Teachers.com daily emails, you can read the entire article in your inbox.

Sign up for the Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week newsletter right here.

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

More Than 18,000 Teachers Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Five years ago I started the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter as an alternative to the daily email digest that is automatically generated from Free Technology for Teachers. The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter is not automatically generated. It's something that I write every weekend and send on Sunday evenings. In the newsletter I share my tip of the week and a list of the most popular posts of the week from Free Technology for Teachers. As of this morning 18,019 people are subscribed to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. You can join them by signing up here.

If you are currently receiving the daily emails from Free Technology for Teachers and you register for the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter, you won't be unsubscribed from the daily email list unless you click the unsubscribe link that is in the footer of the daily email.

Monday, April 22, 2019

More Than 17,000 Teachers Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Over the last ten years the most common reason that people give me for unsubscribing to the blog is "too many updates." That is why five years ago I started the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. This is a newsletter that I send out once a week on Sunday evenings. In the newsletter I share my tip of the week and a list of the most popular posts of the week from Free Technology for Teachers. As of this evening 17,129 people are subscribed to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. You can join them by signing up here.

If you are currently receiving the daily emails from Free Technology for Teachers and you register for the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter, you won't be unsubscribed from the daily email list unless you click the unsubscribe link that is in the footer of the daily email.

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Important Changes for Those Who Follow in RSS and Email

Those of you who follow this in an RSS reader like Feedly or Flipboard may have recently noticed a change in the way that the articles are displayed. Likewise, those who subscribe to the daily emails may have noticed a change in the content display this morning. The change is that from beginning yesterday afternoon my RSS feed will only display the first 150 characters in an article before you will be directed to click a link to read the full article or watch the full video here on FreeTech4Teachers.com.


The change is a direct result of rampant plagiarism!
The plagiarism and unauthorized republication of my work has gotten out of hand in the last couple of months. While I know how to DMCA notices it is a time-consuming process that takes away from writing new content on this blog and takes time away from helping my clients. When I was only dealing with one or two cases of plagiarism per month, I could handle it even though it was terribly annoying. In the last two months I've hand to file more than twenty DMCA takedown notices including twelve this weekend!

Scraping or republishing full RSS feeds is the easiest way to load up a website with lots of content and very little work. Despite knowing that, I've always published my full RSS feed for readers to consume in their RSS readers of choice. Doing that makes it easier to read your favorite blog without having to open multiple tabs. Unfortunately, too many people have taken advantage of me publishing my full RSS feed. From here on, you will only be able to see 150 characters of an article in RSS or email before being directed to click through to FreeTech4Teachers.com. I didn't want to make this change, but it's the only choice I have left. I can't continue to spend the time and energy to fight all the copyright infringements. (BTW, I can't wait to see this blog post pop-up on some spammy blog).

Get a Weekly Summary Sent to You
Five years ago I started the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. More than 16,500 people now subscribe to it. It's an email that I send on Sunday evenings. The newsletter contains my tip of the week and a summary of the most popular posts of the week on Free Technology for Teachers. Subscribe here.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Join 16,000+ Who Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Every Sunday evening I send out the Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week. I started doing that four years ago as a way to provide people who want to get their ed tech tips in weekly format instead of a daily format. In the weekly mailing I include my tip of the week (usually with a video tutorial or two) and a list of the previous week's most popular posts on Free Technology for Teachers.

As of this week more than 16,000 people have subscribed to my Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week. You can subscribe here or through the form embedded below.

Join the newsletter

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Tuesday, December 19, 2017

The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter

Over the years I have had the good fortune of having tens of thousands of educators like you subscribe to the Free Technology for Teachers daily email newsletter. Many people forward it to their colleagues on a regular basis too. But for some people a daily email leads to information overload. That's why I created the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter.

For many years people asked if there was a way to get an email just once a week instead of daily so I created the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. The newsletter is sent on Sunday evening (or Monday depending upon your timezone). In it you will find my favorite educational technology tip of the week along with links to the seven most popular posts of the week from Free Technology for Teachers. Nearly 15,000 people read the newsletter every week.

Click here to subscribe to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter today and you’ll be on the list to receive the next issue this weekend.

Monday, August 21, 2017

10 Good Options for Creating Digital Portfolios

Yesterday's Practical Ed Tech weekly newsletter featured ten tools that your students can use this year to create digital portfolios. A copy of the handout that was included in the newsletter is embedded below.

Friday, March 10, 2017

More Than 13,000 People Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

A few years ago I realized that while many people like to get ed tech news and tips every day, there are just as many people who would prefer to get to get that information at a slower pace. That's why I created the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. Once per week I share via email my favorite tip of the week and a short list of links to the week's most popular posts from FreeTech4Teachers.com.

More than 13,000 people are now subscribed to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. Subscribe to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter today and you'll receive the first tip this coming Sunday evening or Monday morning (depending upon your timezone).

There is also a Practical Ed Tech Facebook page that you can follow for slightly more frequent updates including posts from other authors.

Friday, October 28, 2016

Nearly 19,000 People Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

The reason that I read more often than any other for people unsubscribing from Free Technology for Teachers is "too many updates." That's why over the last two years I've offered two other ways to find my ed tech tips and news in a less frequently updated fashion. Those options are the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter and my YouTube channel.

The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter is sent out once a week on Sunday evening (Monday morning in some parts of the world). The newsletter includes my favorite tip of the week and a list of the week's most popular posts from Free Technology for Teachers. Nearly 12,000 people are subscribed to the newsletter, you can subscribe to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter here.

On my YouTube channel I post a couple of new tutorial videos every week. My YouTube channel has more than 400 video tutorials on everything from G Suite for Education apps to video creation tools to fun and free formative assessment tools. Nearly 7,000 people are subscribed to my YouTube channel and you can subscribe here.

Monday, October 3, 2016

7 Highlights of the Practical Ed Tech Handbook - Get Your Free Copy

Last week I published an updated version of The Practical Ed Tech Handbook. It has been downloaded more than 1,500 times in the last four days. Combined with the previous version The Practical Ed Tech Handbook has been downloaded more than 30,000 times. I hope that many of you who have downloaded it have also printed it and shared it with your colleagues.

In case you haven't looked at it or downloaded it yet, a preview of each section of The Practical Ed Tech Handbook is outlined below.

1. Communication with students and parents.
ClassDojo is a popular tool for creating records of students' behaviors like staying on task, being prepared for class, and general attendance in class. You can also add custom behavior categories to track in your ClassDojo account. Students can sign into their own accounts to see the points they have earned in class. Parents can sign into ClassDojo to see how their children are doing in your classroom.

ClassDojo also provides a free messenger service. ClassDojo Messenger can be used to send messages to parents on an individual basis and on a whole group basis. ClassDojo uses the term "Direct Messaging" to refer to sending messages to individuals and the term "Broadcast Messaging" to refer to sending messages to all parents in a group. ClassDojo Messenger hides the personal contact information of the teacher and the of the parents. Parents have to opt-in to receive messages from the teacher.

2. Web search strategies.
Remind students that not every question needs to be Googled. One of the bad habits that I see many students fall into when it comes to research is simply entering into Google the first thing that comes to mind. While this strategy can work, it often leads to a lot of time wasted on searches for information that students already have. Before embarking on a research project ask students to make a list of the things they already know about the topic they plan to research. Have them look in their notes to see if they already have information on the topic.

3. Digital citizenship.
PBS Kids offers the Webonauts Academy in which elementary school students can learn about safe online behaviors. When students have completed all of the Webonauts missions they will graduate from the Webonauts Academy. The educators tips page offers some practical suggestions for using Webonauts in the classroom or in a school library.

Own Your Space is a free ebook designed to educate tweens and teens about protecting themselves and their stuff online. This ebook isn't a fluffy, general overview book. Each chapter goes into great detail explaining the technical threats that students' computers face online as well as the personal threats to data that students can face online. For example, in the first chapter students learn about different types of malware and the importance of installing security patches to prevent malware infections. The fourteenth chapter explains the differences between secured and unsecured wireless networks, the potential dangers of an unsecured network, and how to lock-down a network.

4. Video creation.
Tellagami is an iPad app that is a lot of fun to use to create narrated animations. Tellagami allows you to create customized animated scenes in a matter of minutes. To create a narrated, animated scene simply open Tellagami and tap “create.” After opening the create menu you will see a default character and background scene. The characters can be altered by selecting from a big menu of customization options. The background scenes can be changed by selecting from a menu or by inserting a picture from your iPad's camera roll. To add your voice to your animations simply tap “record” and start talking. Completed animations are stored on the camera roll of your iPad. Tellagami does not require students to create accounts or have an email address.

5. Audio recording and publishing.
TwistedWave is an audio recording tool through which you can create and edit spoken audio recordings from scratch. Your completed tracks can be exported to Google Drive and SoundCloud. If you have existing audio tracks in your SoundCloud or Google Drive account you can also import it into TwistedWave to edit those audio tracks. TwistedWave's audio editing tools include options for fade-in, fade-out, looping, sound normalization, and pitch adjustments. The editor also includes the typical track clipping tools that you would expect to see in an audio editing tool. Watch a demonstration of TwistedWave at http://bitly.com/twistedwave

6. Backchannels & informal assessment.
Formative provides you with a place to create online classrooms. Your students join your classroom by entering the assigned class code after registering on the Formative website. Once your classroom is established you can begin distributing assignments to students. Assignments can be as simple as one question exit tickets like "what did you learn today?" to complex quizzes that use a combination of multiple choice, short answer, and true/false questions. You can assign point values to questions or leave them as ungraded questions. You can also enable or disable instant feedback for students. When you give an assignment to students through Formative you can watch their responses in realtime. The best feature of Formative is the option to create "show your work" questions. "Show your work" questions enables students to draw responses and or upload pictures as responses to your questions. When you use this question type students will see a blank canvas directly below the question. On that canvas they can draw and or type responses.

7. Digital portfolios.
Google Sites is a good platform on which students and teachers that have Google Apps for Education accounts can build digital portfolios. Page-level permissions in Google Sites allows the creator of a site to share and give editing access to specific pages within a site rather than giving access to edit the entire site. To use page-level permissions open your Google Site editor then click "enable page-level permissions." With page-level permissions activated you can share and allow editing for each page individually. A video tutorial on using page-level permissions can be found here.

Download your free copy of The Practical Ed Tech Handbook
(Note: if Box.com is blocked in your school, you will have to download the handbook at home). 

Friday, August 5, 2016

More Than 11,000 People Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Keeping up with changes in the educational technology landscape can feel like a daunting task. Heck, even keeping up with the blog posts that I publish on Free Technology for Teachers can feel like a lot to do. That's why in January of 2014 I launched the Practical Ed Tech weekly newsletter.

The Practical Ed Tech newsletter is sent out just once per week on Sunday evening (depending on your timezone). The newsletter features one of my favorite ed tech tips and also includes a list of the most popular posts of the week from Free Technology for Teachers. It provides a quick and easy way to get informed about the latest cool tools and tips in the ed tech world.

You can sign up here to join more than 11,000 educators who get their ed tech news through the Practical Ed Tech newsletter.

Saturday, March 19, 2016

9,500 Teachers Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Every month I hear nice compliments from readers of FreeTech4Teachers.com and the FreeTech4Teachers Facebook page followed by, "I don't always have time keep up with it." To solve that problem I started the PracticalEdTech.com newsletter. More than 9,500 people now receive that newsletter in their inboxes on Sunday evening or Monday morning depending on where they live.

The PracticalEdTech.com newsletter includes my tip of the week and the links to that week's most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com. The newsletter is sent out only once per week on Sunday evening (Eastern Standard Time). Click here to subscribe to the PracticalEdTech.com newsletter. And if you don't need another email in your inbox, you can simply visit PracticalEdTech.com to see the same information.

As a bonus for subscribers to the newsletter I give a discount on the popular online courses that I teach through PracticalEdTech.com. Subscribers can also get a discount on the Practical Ed Tech Summer Camps. Email me at richardbyrne (at) freetech4teachers.com for more information on the discounts. 

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Resources from #TCEA16

Over the last two days I had the privilege to give six presentations at the TCEA conference in Austin, Texas. As I always do, I put the slides and other resources from my presentations online at Practical Ed Tech. The six presentations that I gave were:

  • Classroom Uses for Google Books
  • Ten Common Challenges Facing Educators
  • Mind mapping, timelines, and collaborative brainstorming 
  • Discovery, Discussion, Demonstration 
  • 24/7 Learning
  • Leading Students In a Hyper-connected World.
When you land on my TCEA resources page you may be greeted by a pop-up offering the opportunity to subscribe to the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter. That is a free newsletter that I send out every Sunday evening and only on Sunday evening. In the Practical Ed Tech Newsletter I share my favorite tip of the week along with a list of the most popular posts of the week from Free Technology for Teachers

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

More Than 8,000 Teachers Get Their Ed Tech Tips This Way

Every month I hear nice compliments from readers of FreeTech4Teachers.com and the FreeTech4Teachers Facebook page followed by, "I don't always keep up with it." To solve that problem, last year I started the PracticalEdTech.com newsletter. More than 8,000 people are now receiving that newsletter in their inboxes on Sunday evening or Monday morning (depending on where they live).

The PracticalEdTech.com newsletter includes my tip of the week and the links to that week's most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com. The newsletter is sent out only once per week on Sunday evening (Eastern Standard Time). Click here to subscribe to the PracticalEdTech.com newsletter. And if you don't need another email in your inbox, you can simply visit PracticalEdTech.com to see the same information.

As a bonus for subscribers to the PracticalEdTech.com newsletter I give a discount on the popular online courses that I teach through PracticalEdTech.com.