Showing posts with label samsung. Show all posts
Showing posts with label samsung. Show all posts

Monday, October 30, 2017

How to Enter Samsung's Solve for Tomorrow Contest

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post.

Last week I shared some information about Samsung's Solve for Tomorrow contest. he contest is designed to get students in grades six through twelve interested in STEAM projects that can have an immediate impact on local and global communities. As I wrote last week, initial entry into the contest is free and only requires answering a few short questions. In the video below I demonstrate how to complete the initial entry form. Entries are due by November 9th. Take a few minutes to enter and you could be on your way to winning $25,000 worth of Samsung products for your school.


All state finalists (255 in all) will receive a Samsung tablet (valued at $499.99). From those state finalists’ plans, state winners will be chosen. State winners will receive $25,000 in Samsung technology for their schools. State winners will be invited to submit a video about their projects. Those videos will be used in selecting ten national finalists who will receive $50,000 in school technology and a trip to the national pitch event where three national winners will be chosen. National winners will receive $150,000 in Samsung technology for their schools.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Solve for Tomorrow and Win for Your School

Disclosure: this is a sponsored blog post. 

Samsung’s Solve for Tomorrow competition is currently underway and there is still time to for you to enter. The contest is designed to get students in grades six through twelve interested in STEAM projects that can have an immediate impact on local and global communities. Some past contest finalists have designed projects that utilize drones to reduce the use of pesticides on crops, created projects to feed hungry students, and developed emergency shelter solutions to help those affected by natural disasters.

One of the benefits of creating a Solve for Tomorrow entry is that it can help your students identify and propose solutions to problems that affect their local communities. But, as you can see from past contest finalists, the problems and solutions that students identify often have global applications. Furthermore, creating Solve for Tomorrow projects can help your students see the importance of integrating skills from science, technology, engineering, arts, and math into meaningful solutions to real world problems.

This contest is unique in its format. Initial entry takes just a few minutes of your time. The key part of the initial entry form is three short responses to the following questions:
  • What is the most difficult problem faced by your school’s community?
  • How can STEAM be applied to address this issue?
  • What is the biggest hurdle your students face in the classroom that hinders their academic achievement?
After the initial entries are submitted (deadline is November 9th), state finalists will be selected to submit an activity plan. All state finalists (255 in all) will receive a Samsung tablet (valued at $499.99). From those state finalists’ plans, state winners will be chosen. State winners will receive $25,000 in Samsung technology for their schools. State winners will be invited to submit a video about their projects. Those videos will be used in selecting ten national finalists who will receive $50,000 in school technology and a trip to the national pitch event where three national winners will be chosen. National winners will receive $150,000 in Samsung technology for their schools.

Get some inspiration for your STEAM project by watching a few of the videos from last year’s Solve for Tomorrow contest finalists.

Remember, initial entries are due by November 9th. Take a few minutes to enter today!

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

5 Takeaways from Redefining Professional Development

On Monday afternoon at the ISTE conference I was one of four people on a panel discussion titled Redefining Professional Development for the Curriculum of the Future. Unfortunately, I didn't get as much time to speak as I had hoped for. Throughout the discussion I was taking notes on what the other panelists were saying. These are my big takeaways from those panelists along with two points that I tried to make.

1. Nobody wants more for kids than parents. - Rob Burggraaf was talking about organizing parent night to show parents the benefits of their children using technology.

2. Saying no to technology is saying no to advancing student learning. - Linda Cole talking about getting teachers on board with technology integration programs.

3. Technology centers (in a classroom) aren't just for Kindergarten classrooms. - Ashley Hays talking about using technology throughout the school day.

4. Plan your technology goals to be a positive influence in students' lives beyond the time they are in your school. - Me talking about designing technology integration programs.

5. Celebrate the technology innovators in your school. Encourage them to their good work to with other teachers. - Me talking about getting teachers excited about using technology.